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Thread: North East England - Steam Days Screenshots - Large Screenshots Possible

  1. #991
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    Thanks for that
    JackDownUnder

  2. #992
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    Default 1908 - McDonnel 59 Class and a Stopping Passenger

    The previous screenshot has an alternative to the C1 Class, a McDonnell 59 Class 0-6-0 (later J22).




    McDonnell's arrival as N.E.R. Engineer following Fletcher's retirement was meant to bring in an era of more powerful engines and standardisation. His efforts did not meet expectations and he resigned quite quickly. One of his products was the 59 Class 0-6-0, which neither surpassed Fletcher's 398 Class nor was standardised! The first 32 were built at Darlington in four batches of 8 between September 1883 and September 1888. They had scalloped running boards over the leading and driving axles and predominantly provided with 5ft 1in wheels. Bizarrely, Darlington turned out two with 5ft 7 1/2 in wheels, which was hardly standardisation. Matters did not improve in that regard with the dozen engines built by contractor R, Stephenson & Co. between October 1884 and March 1885. This batch had longer frames, straight running plate. Wilson Worsdell reboilered the class between 1896 and 1904, though the boiler pitch differed between Darlington and Stephenson engines.

    All forty-four of the class reached the grouping, though the L.N.E.R. quite quickly began withdrawing them. However, being fitted with westinghouse brake and steam heating connection they were in demand for passenger trains at peak times, such as summer Saturdays. Starbeck shed had one on allocation, No.491, a Darlington built engine and I have it standing in for a failed C1 Class 0-6-0 on the rostered working which began at 10.22 am with the passenger train from Harrogate to West Hartlepool.

    Last edited by borderreiver; August 1st, 2021 at 07:27 AM.

  3. #993
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    Default 1905 - An O Class and a Newcastle Link C Set

    Taking an O Class 0-4-4T out for a run with a Newcastle Link C set made up of 52ft clerestory roof carriages.




    The new addition is the second carriage in the rake, a Diagram 74 Lav Compo with 5 First and 2 Third Class compartments.
    Thirty-three were built in 1903-4.
    In 1906 the company added a further 52ft Lav Compo (5-2), an elliptical roof Diagram 121, following up with another in 1907.
    Three years then elapsed before a final tranche of four Diagram 121s appeared in 1910.
    Under the LNER both diagrams were under the code XCL(5-2).



  4. #994
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    Default 1906 NER 52ft Lav Compo Diagram 122

    Another in an occasional posting of N.E.R. carriages in the style of vintage postcards of the early 2oth century. This time it is an elliptical roof 52ft Lav Compo to Diagram 122 with four First Class and three Third Class compartments.




    The main example of the type within the company was the clerestory roof Diagram 5 carriage, of which 138 were built between 1896 and 1905. However come 1906 the new Diagram 122 was introduced with an elliptical roof. Five examples built that year. Four years were to elapse until in 1910 the company required three more. The CL(4-3) type (LNER Code XCL(4-3)) was the type assigned to the main line consists, which were not the company's premier express passenger trains but the sets plying local passenger services predomnantly along the East Coast Main Line between York and Edinburgh, though they could be seen off the ECML at Alnwick and Consett. They were also found in consists based at Leeds and Hull.

    Like their other pre-grouping siblings BR had dispensed with them from scheduled passenger trains by 1953, with one or two seen in departmental use during the 1960s as storage or as yard accomodation for staff.


  5. #995

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    I am very late to this thread which I could have found long ago. Although I am very familiar with the locomotive types that operated on the BR North Eastern (lived in York in the 1940s and 50s — within the streaks whistle range!) I am not familiar with the carriage types used (though I do remember being in non-corridor coaches on the York to Whitby route, likely in the late 40s). Since 2015 I have been slowly making a layout I'm calling the Whitby, Pickering & Scarborough Railway, based in BR steam days, and it was whilst looking for new assets that I came across hiskey and that has led me here. I was in the process of saying that I don't know how to post an image, but I think now I have found out how and will when I get organized. In the meantime thanks for all the beautiful images of NE locos and coaches.

  6. #996

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    WP&SR: Overview from south of Whitby looking down the Esk Valley.

    https://imgur.com/9lclrcT

    OK, so that didn't work!

    Obviously I need help!

    Edited attempt:

    Last edited by dwoodcock; September 16th, 2021 at 11:13 PM.

  7. #997
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    Welcome David. Your route looks great, it will take a little to understand the forums. Most of the locos and coaches you see are made by me, an Englishman living in the USA. I have been modelling in Trainz since 2005 in all the versions so can usually equip fellow Trainzers with the goods to make their routes more realistic, be it locos, coaches, wagons or scenery. Have a look on the download station (DLS) for some of my signal boxes for your area, NE England.

    This thread was created by borderreiver (Frank) from your neck of the woods and contributed by JackDownUnder (Jack) in Australia, who are both working on their NE England routes and big users of my items (they commissioned them). Kotanagirl is from New Zealand and is also building routes. Often these will end up on the DLS so all can enjoy.
    Last edited by barn700; September 16th, 2021 at 07:09 AM.
    http://www.paulztrainz.com

    Paul of Paulz Trainz (est 2004)

  8. #998
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    Hello David

    Thanks for swinging by. As Paul already explained, he has built a great deal of content for me over the past ten years. As with most lines, the Pickering to Whitby route via Grosmont changed significantly between 1900 and 1950. If you rode in a non-corridor carriage after 1952 then the odds are it was either a Thomspon era carriage (which Paul has built several examples for me) or a Gresley era carriage (which so far I have not got round to have Paul build for me).

    Around 1899 the NER built a range of 45ft bogie carriages with clerestory roof specifically for the Pickering to Whitby and the locomotives permitted on the line were restricted to only a few types "due to the curvature of the line". After 1904 some 49ft arc roof carriages began to appear after being cascaded from their previous stamping ground of North Tyneside. This was due to electrification. The restrictions relating to locomotives remained in force. Around 1910 through carriages from London Kings Cross began to appear, with one set being provided by the NER and one set provided by the GNR. Again, the restrictions on the classes of locomotives on the line remained.

    It was down to the LNER to ease restrictions on the locos, driven by the scrapping of elderly former NER locos. It has never been determined what, if any, measures were taken to "ease the curvature" which were allegedly the reason for the NER era restrictions.

  9. #999

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    WP&SR. A view of Grosmont station and the two tunnels, the left-hand one being the original tunnel for the Whitby & Pickering coach service and which likely led to the community initially being called Tunnel. This tunnel remained open aas a pedestrian route to cottages and the signal box at Deviation Junction, and it's current use is as a passageway to the NYMR shed (50H!).

    Thanks to both borderriever and barn700 for information. However, I seem to lack the skill to install a photograph into the thread page itself. Help in this would be appreciated. I am using the 'insert image' which leads to nothing being inserted!

    Well, this seems to have worked!


    Last edited by dwoodcock; September 16th, 2021 at 05:52 PM.

  10. #1000
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    Hi Dave - log in to your imgur.com account and click on images, click on one of your images and a dialgue box should open. The bottom entry has the link for message boards and forums. Copy it.
    Paste it in to your forum post.

  11. #1001
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    Default 1911 - Shildon and a Fletcher 124 Class 0-6-0T

    North East England during the steam era. A Fletcher 124 Class 0-6-0T Goods Engine at Shildon.




    The 124 Class was small, with only 12 examples and was originally in the style of Fletcher's BTP 0-4-4T. However, during Wilson Worsdell's tenure, they gained both steel Worsdell boilers and side tanks to increase water capacity. One of the twelve did not receive side tanks but instead received a saddle tank. However, this was changed out for side tanks some time prior to grouping. Around 1903 eight of the twelve received Westinghouse brakes in order that they could haul fitted rolling stock and some went on to receive steam heating by 1910, probably for empty stock movements rather than hauling passenger trains. One exception was No.124, which was a long-term resident of Ferryhill shed and was called on to work the branch passenger train to Coxhoe. It would seem that prior to 1910 either the stock (6-wheelers?) lacked steam heating equipment or were carriages which had steam heating but were just run unheated. That cannot have been popular with passengers, though perhaps the porters at Ferryhill could provide heating earthenware bottles, as was th enorm prior to carriages receiving steam heating equipment.

    .

  12. #1002
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    Very nice Frank, I must say that I have a soft spot for Fletcher's engines.
    Narcolepsy is not napping.



  13. #1003
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    Default 1911 - Shildon and a Fletcher 124 Class

    Thanks Annie. Fletcher's usual laissez-faire attitude remained present in the 124 Class. Only twelve engines built at a single works across 1881 and 1882 yet some had axle springing above the running plate while others had it beneath the running plate. Some had 4ft 6in diameter wheels while others had 4ft 9in diameter wheels. A further difference was that some had the large brass numberplate on the bunker and others had it on the cab. Worsdell did nothing regarding any of those differences when reboilering them, though he used the same boiler as for the BTP on some and a shortened boiler from the 1001 Class on others. Worsdell also extended their range by adding the saddle tank for one and side tanks for the remainder. He also added the rear sandboxes for the rear axles, presumably to assist starting when running bunker first. The N.E.R. certainly believed in getting its value for money out of its assets, even from small classes such as this.
    Last edited by borderreiver; October 1st, 2021 at 05:56 AM.

  14. #1004
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    Hello Frank, Very interesting the detail differences in the Fletcher 124 Class & amazing in 12 engines as well. I wonder if any were around into LNER days & then classified in J? maybe into 71.
    Also the heated bottles for unheated carriages was new to me also. I do recollect the coaches to London had travel rugs to wrap round legs late 1940'era but long before .Nat Express when the large bus operators ran them. It is obvious railways were recycling long before modern trends. They could have been at the pioneering end of recycling. Nice one loco was allocated Coxhoe branch duty.

  15. #1005
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    Hello Tailight98, The class was the J76 in LNER days but the last one in LNER service was scrapped in 1929. Five of them moved to former H&BR lines at Hull in 1925, with Alexandra Dock being their usual haunt. One was sold out to industry, becoming AJAX at the Milford Dock Company, lasting until 1940. I am digging deeper and it seems that the passenger service on the former Clarence Railway to Coxhoe ended in 1902. The RCTS says that No.124 received Westinghouse "by 1903" and that No.124 was hauling the Coxhoe branch passenger train twice a day "in the early years of the 20th century". So, presumably the Westinghouse pump and automatic train brake was applied prior to 1902, perhaps as early as 1900 if the locomotive hauled passenger coaches for a couple of years. They would have lacked heating (No.124 gaining steam heating in 1910) so the passengers would have had to rely on the old hot water bottles. I think that I saw one at York National Rail Museum. Around 12 to 18 inches long, flat base, arched shape along with the filling neck and stopper. Supposedly, they were usually under passengers' feet when hot and then shoved under the seats when they cooled, which may have been quite quickly on a winter's night. Luckily for Coxhoe passengers the trip was only a few minutes, so the hardier rmembers of the public may have done without.
    Last edited by borderreiver; October 1st, 2021 at 12:03 PM.

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