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Thread: North East England - Steam Days Screenshots - Large Screenshots Possible

  1. #691
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    Really liking your lineside pictures Frank.
    Narcolepsy is not napping.



  2. #692
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    Default 1920s ECML Northumberland

    Thanks Annie,

    Some cab shots from the L.N.E.R. A1 Class Gresley Pacific on the Up express for London Kings Cross.




    The view from the cab approaching Acklington from the north.




    Having passed through Acklington station the line south towards Amble junction.




    Amble junction's Up distant signal.

  3. #693
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    Nice summery shots borderreiver. Indicative of a summer we all hope to see!

    Rob.

  4. #694
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    Default 1920s ECML Rural Northumberland

    Hi Robd - I certainly hope that we see it (and not from indoors) though it looks like spring will be mainly seen from inside our homes or within our gardens (the lucky ones who have a garden that is).

    Below, while waiting at Widdrington station, the cab view from the D49 of a former N.E.R. Worsdell J27 0-6-0 of Percy Main shed bringing a coal train off the Stobswood Colliery branch, bound for staithes on the north side of the River Tyne at Northumberland Dock. it will mean a reversal at Morpeth for the J27 to gain the Blyth & Tyne route. This will need to be done smartly, since Morpeth sits astride the ECML and the District Controller will want the humble coal train out of the way of any express passenger trains. The desire to keep the main line clear for express passenger trains contributes to time standing idle for the footplate crews of mineral engines. Around half their shift of eight hours will be spent waiting, either at the colliery, in a loop or in a siding.






  5. #695
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    More excellent cab screenshots Frank. I suppose with the lockdowns Trainz folk will have to what I do all the time and escape into their own created worlds.
    Narcolepsy is not napping.



  6. #696
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    Default 1920s ECML in Rural Northumberland

    Hi Annie, thanks for that. Yes, here the digital permanent way gangs have been out laying track. Perhaps on the Chevington route the gangs will reach Broomhill on the Amble branch, which will then mean connecting track to another colliery.

    Today it is hard to imagine the port of Amble as a port where coal was shipped out in quantity. A marina was built on the site of the small shipyard and there is virtually no trace of the staithes where coal was tipped in to the colliers. It is an indicator of just how busy the ports of the Wear, Tyne and Blyth were that a place the size of Amble (or its ancient name "Warkworth harbour") was able to prosper as a coal shipping location. In the mix of Amble's growth was the costs of rail haulage to staithes at Blyth or on the Tyne versus the cost of hauling it to Amble for collection by coastal shipping. However, smaller colliers of the size which could dock at Amble were more expensive per ton than the larger ones docking at Blyth, but the staithes at Blyth were busy with tipping coal from the collieries around Blyth and Ashington. (some in steel bodied 40 Ton N.E.R. bogie hoppers) There may have been anxiety on the part of the colliery owners about incurring demurrage charges if they delayed a collier at Blyth or on the Tyne because it could not get a timely spot at the staithes or when there could not be loaded promptly because of inability of their trainload to access the staithes. No staithesmaster would have been happy about an idle collier taking up one of his berths.

    The L.N.E.R. Gresley A1 pacific approaches Amble Junction from the north.




    Approaching Chevington.



  7. #697
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    Default The Amble Branch Water tank

    Northeast England during the steam era. On the Amble branch, at 3/4 of a mile from the zero point at Amble Junction there was a water tank and water crane. It is mentioned in Bartle Rippon's book on the Amble branch and its location is clear on both the 25 inch to the mile map as well as the N.E.R. line diagram for the branch. What is not clear is why it was sited on plain single track some distance away from the junction, intermediate station or even the level crossing some distance away to the east. I cannot say whether passenger trains stopped to water there, given the existence of a tank and water crane at the Amble terminus, but if they did it certainly would have extended the journey time by a significant factor, probably to the great frustration of passengers. Most branch trains terminated at Chevington, necessitating a change of train. There were only a couple of railway cottages at Chevington, so it was definitely not a destination in its own right. It is surprising that it survived the closure of the Amble branch passenger service.


    Last edited by borderreiver; March 31st, 2020 at 03:59 PM.

  8. #698

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    Great shots Frank, thanks for sharing. Always cool to find out more about a real route.

  9. #699
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    Default The Amble Branch

    Thanks for that Ardaeshir. One of the things about photographs of real routes is that it helps generate an almost limitless list of "things I wish were on the DLC"!! In the case of the actual water tank it was a brick structure with iron/steel plate riveted plates for the tank. The brickwork was around twelve feet high with what looks to be a concrete/stone lintel course above that on which the tank sat. There was a door and a window in the tank base on the side facing the track.

    My tracklaying has reached Broomhill, which means that I need to find a reasonable wooden building to stand in for the station building which was located there between 1879 and 1930. It was, in overall terms, the same outline as that on the Up platform at Chevington, which means that it was not of the impressive manorial stone style seen at Acklington, Warkworth and Belford. Chevington seems to have had brick ends compared to Broomhill's total timber construction, just to make it interesting. The Amble terminus was something different again. A brick built station building with access from the street at ground floor level but platforms on the first floor level some eight to ten feet above that. That makes it more like Waterhouses station on the Waterhouses branch.

    Regards
    Frank

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    The ever present problem of trying to find buildings that are a close enough match, - or else a good enough base for retexturing. I'm presently having to look at retexturing a bunch of Victorian shops modelled for the modern era to make them proper Victorian era shops again.

    That lonely water tank makes for a great screenshot and looks very like the sort of thing that would be found on a goods or minerals traffic only line. From your description though Frank it does seem to be a mystery as to its original purpose on the Amble branch.
    Narcolepsy is not napping.



  11. #701
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    Default The Amble Branch Water Tank

    Hi Annie,

    The Amble branch was originally built in 1849 by the York, Newcastle and Berwick Railway as a mineral line for the export of coal through "Warkworth Harbour". A harbour had been built there in 1826, though at that time Amble was a small village to the west comprising of several cottages built along the bank of the River Coquet. The main forms of employment during the 1841 census were farming and fishing. The principal customer for the YN&BR was to be Broomhill Colliery, sunk some 76 years earlier during 1773 to extract high quality steam coal. Broomhill already had its own wagonway reaching "Warkworth Harbour" from the south by way of its sister colliery at Radcliffe, sunk in 1836. In contrast, the Y.N.&B.R. would approach from the southwest. Traffic grew throughout the 1850s, 60s and 70s and in 1879 the North Eastern Railway commenced running a passenger service, which would become an early casualty under the L.N.E.R. running the last branch passenger train on July 3rd 1930.

    The water tank was brick built and appears to me to be a contemporary of the passenger service commencement, just as the station and water crane at Amble were. I cannot find out what locomotive watering arrangements existed on the branch under the Y.N.&B.R. and N.E.R. between 1849 and 1879. Both the N.E.R.A. line diagram for the branch and the OS 25 inch map refer to "cisterns" sited beside the line between the junction and the water tank. There are no details as to what their capacities were but I believe that it is possible that a degree of watering could have been accomplished by them. Alternatively, it is possible that a water tank existed at the harbour end of the branch from 1849, though its construction materials are a mystery. Colliery locomotives would have taken coal and water at their colliery shed at Broomhill.

    I am going to put my neck out and say that the tank is likely to have been for watering mineral engines. Perhaps the tank at Amble was "reserved" for the branch passenger engine and, despite its remote location, the water tank at this end was the closest location found in 1879 at which to secure water in sufficient quantity for watering mineral locomotives.

  12. #702
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    I have uploaded a cab view video to youtube of the D49 running between Widdrington and Acklington stations.






  13. #703
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    And a lovely landscape it is too Frank.
    Narcolepsy is not napping.



  14. #704
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    Many thanks Annie. Still a long way to go with it though!

  15. #705
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    Excellent video, superb looking route.

    Rob.

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