.
Page 2 of 7 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 101

Thread: The How to Design a 1950s North American themed Trainz layout thread

  1. #16

    Default

    Also worth looking at is Octl2 PRR Chautauqua thread.
    Its pretty inspirational for me, along with Dricketts.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    United States of America, MO, Kansas City
    Posts
    3,211
     

    Default

    Can anyone identify or have any clues about where the houses and mailboxes came from in the 1st post and pic of this thread?

    http://forums.auran.com/trainz/showt...ght=Kree8tiviT

    I'm always looking for more houses that are typical of the Midwest in the 1950's and those look perfect.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    United States of America, Arkansas, Harrison
    Posts
    3,205
     

    Default

    -----------Deleted----------------
    Last edited by MSGSapper; August 20th, 2015 at 11:04 AM.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Riverbank, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,313
    Blog Entries
    1
     

    Default

    All of the suggestions so far are great, but there is one thing you have to bear in mind. In the 1950s and early 60s the ONLY way to get goods from your factory to a consignee was from your loading dock or team track to the consignee's loading dock or team track. Very different from today when trucks transfer containers from factory to container yard, by rail to the next nearest container yard, and on to the recipient. I'm modelling the SPs Coast line from San Francisco to Oxnard, CA, and I can tell you I have over 1000 industrial pickup and delivery points along the way, and these are only the ones I could verify through reliable authorities. Every town during this period had trackage snaking down streets and alleys to every factory and warehouse along the way. It was the age of the single car loading and I love it. Find a source for Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps for your area, many public libraries have digitized versions, and old USGS maps. They are amazing.

    Bernie

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    United States of America
    Posts
    2,228
     

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SD45T-2 View Post

    50' is used on TOFC cars,...
    Except that in the 1950's, TOFC was still very much in the experimental stage, and was not commonly seen.


    Brick and Mortar, Concrete, and wood rather than steel for buildings.
    In the 1950's, the steel Quonset hut <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quonset_hut> was commonly seen.

    Open autoracks.
    Few, if any, autoracks would have been seen on most railroads in the 1950's. Pullman (and others) were developing these in the very late 1950's, and most railroads would probably did not have handled these during the early to mid 1950's. Automobiles during that period, if they were handled by rail, were shipped in 50 foot automobile box cars.

    Quote Originally Posted by jukeboxblues
    The problem is finding 1950's era buildings. Do you have a resource for these?
    Remember that well built structures tend to last a long time. Drive through small towns in the US, and one finds many buildings from as early as 1890 still standing and in use. And in fact, on a 1950's era route, I'd suggest that 85-90 percent of the structures should be older. !950s era buildings would be needed much more on a 1960's era route, than a 1950's era one.

    ns
    M.U.T.O.T.T.

    I've found the key to world peace a dozen times. Unfortunately, they keep changing the lock.

  6. #21

    Default

    TOFC wasnt sooo rare back then. Got the impression that roads which specialized on fast freight had more of them anyway.
    (NKP comes to mind, but on the N&WHS website, Ive found photo of a X39 flatcar amidst a train hauled by a Y6!)

    The statement about the open racks is correct, they are more 60s. There were also special rack-equipped 40ft boxcars for automobiles.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Greater Chicagoland
    Posts
    1,550
     

    Default

    My current project is set between 1952 and 1962, so this thread piqued my interest.

    Some things I've noticed, at least from a midwestern perspective...

    - Don't forget yellow stop signs (As Dricketts has pointed out) or black-striped crossing gates (Maybe even throw in a wig-wag). There were also more unprotected crossings than there are now.

    - Abandoned (or active) traction lines are a nice touch, as are suburban subdivisions/highways under construction.

    - If modeling the midwest, be sure to include lots of open farmland and forest. Working on my current project, I was surprised to see how much of my area wasn't built up until the mid-to-late 1960s.

    - Small airfields - Commercial airliners didn't show up until 1958 or so. Highways existed, but they weren't as big or complex.

    - Cities should be much more industrial. Rural areas should have shacks and outhouses.

    - Also be sure to include automobiles from the 1930s and 1940s.

    - If you're modeling the post-dieselization era, there were still some abandoned coaling and watering stations around. Also, include a few abandoned wyes (steam engines needed them to turn around).
    Last edited by Blutorse4792; January 25th, 2013 at 01:11 PM.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    United States of America, West Virginia, Podunk
    Posts
    902
    Blog Entries
    1
     

    Default

    This 1954 video gets a bit corny at times, but it does provide insight into the size and type of railroad cars used, and the variety of goods shipped, during the 1950s. And there are a good many other 1950s railroad videos at YouTube worth watching! For example, this N&W produced video below provides a visual record of the types/sizes of RR cars used, and goods transported, but also provides glimpses of steam locomotives still in use during the era...

    Last edited by wva-usa; January 24th, 2013 at 04:16 PM.

    Visit my website: SteamSoundz.com, my blog: WV Railroads @ Blogger, and my YouTube channel

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    United States of America, Washington, Seattle
    Posts
    3,397
     

    Default

    I also did a number of yellow stop signs a while back: KUID2:124060:60037:1; KUID2:124060:60038:1; KUID2:124060:60039:1; KUID2:124060:60040:1; KUID2:124060:60041:1; and KUID2:124060:60042:1 (and a couple of white ones, which I suspect would be all but gone by that time..)

    Also a 48-star flag (reskin of one of Zato's flags): KUID:124060:60033

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    United States of America, Washington, Seattle
    Posts
    147
     

    Default

    Bob,

    Thanks for the information about the Indiana Western route and it's conversion to TS12.

    The 50's are my period of interest.

    I downloaded your Indiana Western route into TS12 and everything but the track showed-up.

    Can you point me to where I can find the track you used.

    Thanks,

    Wes

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Newcastle NSW Australia
    Posts
    7,071
     

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MSGSapper View Post
    There are plenty of building and structures on the DLS that look "50ish". Structure and vehicle content developers on the DLS that I tend to use, besides some of my own stuff (msgsapper) are:

    hobbyman350
    Dinorius_Redundicus
    dmdrake
    bendorsey
    euphod
    davesnow

    Just do a search on the DSL using the user names above for the "Building/Structures" category.

    Note: While these kind and creative folks are not the only ones I necessarily use for everything, they are developers from my own personal "preferred short list" of building/structure content developers for my various layouts and I get the bulk of my needed structures content from them for whatever era I am working.
    Bob

    Still working on that 1935 Dodge Airflow tanker for you. As you said, these were used during the 1950's.
    Progress so far shown below...and apologies for the slowness. These things have complex curvy bits and not so easy to make.

    ~ Deane


    Last edited by Dinorius_Redundicus; January 25th, 2013 at 12:17 AM.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    5,481
     

    Default

    That looks awesome deane!

    Jamie



  13. #28
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    United States of America, Arkansas, Harrison
    Posts
    3,205
     

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wklang View Post
    Bob,Thanks for the information about the Indiana Western route and it's conversion to TS12.The 50's are my period of interest.I downloaded your Indiana Western route into TS12 and everything but the track showed-up.Can you point me to where I can find the track you used.Thanks,Wes
    The track is on the DLS and has been downloaded over 52,000 times so far but here is the link:

    Track Wood SG with light brown ballast-TRS2010:

    http://www.auran.com/TRS2004/DLS_vie...AssetID=205948

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    United States of America, Arkansas, Harrison
    Posts
    3,205
     

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dinorius_Redundicus View Post
    Bob

    Still working on that 1935 Dodge Airflow tanker for you. As you said, these were used during the 1950's. Progress so far shown below...and apologies for the slowness. These things have complex curvy bits and not so easy to make.~ Deane
    I understand. Afterall you can't rush art! It takes whatever time it takes. Wonderful screenshot and a first class job!!

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    United States of America, Colorado, Colorado Springs
    Posts
    92
     

    Default

    "Track Wood SG with light brown ballast-TRS2010:" isn't this European track? US track has spikes and fish plates. This track is screwed down.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •