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Thread: So you think you know about Trains? - Pt 2

  1. #31
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    Yes - no knowledge of railways or trains needed only how to search with google.

    Dave
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  2. #32
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    OTOH, for an online trivia, what is more important? Being the first to answer a question, or learning something new about railways?

    We do attempt to make some of the trivia questions difficult, however at the same time we also look for questions that may allow people to learn a little about railways, railway history, etc
    Zec Murphy

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  3. #33
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    the atlantic highlands express?
    Will Champion

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zec Murphy View Post
    OTOH,

    We do attempt to make some of the trivia questions difficult, however at the same time we also look for questions that may allow people to learn a little about railways, railway history, etc
    Quite true as you usually end up knowing not only the answer but quite a few other facts as well while searching & reading looking for the right reply to the question.

    Dave
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  5. #35
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    I thought the same thing as Ed when this started.....however, I didn't know the answer to any of the questions on my own, but now I do...

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by last week's question
    There was a sister train to the Central Railroad of New Jersey's Blue Comet that ran from New York City to Wilkes-Barre. What was its name, and color scheme? (Thank you to Jadebullet for this weeks trivia question)
    The sister train to the Blue Comet was ‘The Bullet’, which was painted dark green.








    This weeks question:
    What is double double heading, and why is this done? (Thank you to UP8328 for this weeks trivia question)
    Zec Murphy

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  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by last week's question
    There was a sister train to the Central Railroad of New Jersey's Blue Comet that ran from New York City to Wilkes-Barre. What was its name, and color scheme? (Thank you to Jadebullet for this weeks trivia question)
    Double Heading (as well as Triple Heading, and so on) is the use of more than one locomotive on the head or point of a train when one of the locomotives in not equipped for M/U operation, with each locomotive having it’s own crew. This is done to provide extra power when hauling a heavy train, and was relatively common in the steam era, and early diesel era. Most trains today have ‘multiple-unit’ cabilities, which allow them to run with only one crew controlling many locomotives in the one consist.
















    This weeks question:
    What is the purpose of a ‘scotch block’ in a railway yard?
    Zec Murphy

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  8. #38
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    What is the purpose of a ‘scotch block’ in a railway yard

    To chock or wedge the wheels to stop train cars from moving
    Similar to those used on aircraft & cars

    Dave
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  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by ZecMurphy View Post

    This weeks question:
    What is the purpose of a ‘scotch block’ in a railway yard?
    A scotch block is used to lock a set of points in one particular direction. This is usually to avoid rollingstock straying on to a main line.

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    Bill69
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  10. #40
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    Sounds like what we here in the US call a 'derail' . It tends to be a piece of, I assume metal, that is in the shape of a wedge that slopes toward the middle of the tracks, preventing a moving car from ending up on the mainline. It literally derails the car by derailing it to end up with one wheel in between the rails and the other outside the rails. It'll cost a lot of money to 'rerail' the car, which tends to require lifting the car by a crane or something else, but it gets the job done.

  11. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by jordon412 View Post
    Sounds like what we here in the US call a 'derail' . It tends to be a piece of, I assume metal, that is in the shape of a wedge that slopes toward the middle of the tracks, preventing a moving car from ending up on the mainline. It literally derails the car by derailing it to end up with one wheel in between the rails and the other outside the rails. It'll cost a lot of money to 'rerail' the car, which tends to require lifting the car by a crane or something else, but it gets the job done.
    It depends on how badly the car is derailed, but over the years I've watched railroad crews rerailing a variety of cars and equipment, including loaded 100-ton coal cars and steam locomotive tenders using a "rerailer", with no assistance from a crane required. Pic below:



    Rerailers were commonly carried in the toolboxes of most caboose cars and underneath the tenders on many steam locomotives.

    You can see the rerailer mounted above the rear truck in the pic of the Rio Grande tender on this page.
    Last edited by wva-usa; December 8th, 2012 at 05:58 PM.

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  12. #42
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    There are actually diferent types of Scotch Block, some will derail runaway rollingstock and some just lock a set of points as I stated above.

    Cheers,
    Bill
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  13. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by last week's question
    What is the purpose of a ‘scotch block’ in a railway yard?
    The ‘scotch block’ in a railway yard is also known as a ‘derail’, and is used to derail a train or wagon within the yard, before it reaches the mainline tracks. This prevents a train that has not been permitted to leave the yard (e.g. a runaway wagon) from colliding with a train on the mainline, or derailing on the mainline and blocking the track.
































    This weeks question:
    What is the purpose of a ‘scotch block’ in a railway yard?
    Zec Murphy

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  14. #44
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    Other answers depending where you look & depending on location as stated above

    Scotch block: a wedge or block placed against a wheel to prevent movement.


    SpragsOn severe inclines, it is not sufficient to depend on the parking brakes of coaches or wagons to keep them stabled or parked. Sprags are metal (steel) bars that are inserted between the spokes of a wagon's wheels to prevent it from rolling away; scotch blocks or stop blocks are wooden or metal wedges that are placed on the rail under a wheel for the same purpose. Also called scotch blocks / stop blocks

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  15. #45
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    The purpose of the booster was to increase starting tractive effort for a steam locomotive. Steam locomotives generated their highest horsepower and tractive at speed. They need the booster to start the train and once the train was moving the booster was normally cut off

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