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Thread: CAB Mode Driving Tip - Diesel Locomotives

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Falcus View Post
    saw this and had to ask. As I recall, the Ammeter is also used as a guide to avoiding what I'll call for the time being, unnecessary or dangerous power usage? IE, if you're pushing you're locomotive too hard in some manner particularly going up grades or starting, you're likely to end up with any number of unwanted scenarios, from wheel slippage, to broken couplers, to blow turbos/cooked circuits (Not that these can't happen anyway, but probably not because you're pushing your engine too hard).... The ammeter is as close as you get in a diesel to a real time "Status Report" on the your Power's progress in pulling or starting whatever load you're hauling, and would replace what steam engineers basically had to do by sound and touch (Hearing how hard the cylinders are working, or feeling them vibrate through the frame).

    Of course, thats just my understanding, hence the question, and feel free to correct me if I'm wrong...
    Falcus
    IIRC, you are dealing with a system which maintains a level voltage, so AMPS becomes directly proportional to power, especially given a constant impedance (windings + Resistance). Since frequency is controlled by the MG (Motor-Generator) RPMs, the 8 throttle notches of the Deisel Electric have--for each throttle setting-- an equation which is constant to the changed impedance from the previous frequency. In essence, the Amps indicate efficiency at that throttle setting, and are indicative, meaning directly proportional to the power being used.

    Consider a triain going over a hump. When all is on one side rolling resistance and gravity oppose the motion, so both are deceleration forces. The power draw will grow as the train struggles up the grade. When half the train is descending whilst the tail is climbing, the Amperage/Power should begin dropping for gravity is now opposing and aiding acceleration forces from the Loco. When the caboose reaches the summit, the power needs go to a minimum as gravity is fully in charge.

    What is actually probably being measured is not the output current, but the field current, which responds to the reverse EMF of the load reflected back through the stator winding... which is feeding the output. If the motor requires more current to maintain a constant speed (the governor of that throttle notch) the Ammeter indicates the draw. The feedback is electro-magnetic, the reverse EMF, a frictionlike effect opposing change in speed. Dynamic brakes use the THAT to slow the train, when coupled the other way about. // F


    Quote Originally Posted by JCitron View Post
    This makes sense as the ammeter measures current draw on the motors.

    Here's the complete Ohm's Law, which I haven't dealt with in close to 35 years as a technician, and mostly while taking circuit analysis classes in college!

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ohm%27s_law

    Current, as measured in amperes using an ammeter, is directly proportional to the amount of voltage and resistance in a circuit. So if the voltage goes up, in relation to the resistance which stays the same, then the current will increase. Increasing the resistance, also in relation to the same voltage level, will lower the current, however, decreasing it will increase the amount of current.

    John
    Extra points John, if you can show the derivation from E=IR to P=I^2 /R! // Frank

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fabartus View Post
    Extra points John, if you can show the derivation from E=IR to P=I^2 /R! // Frank
    This, for you a missing the point, was a joke. P= I^2 * R, and deriving the relation would be like bench pressing a loco! // Frank

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fabartus View Post
    What is actually probably being measured is not the output current, but the field current, which responds to the reverse EMF of the load reflected back through the stator winding... which is feeding the output. If the motor requires more current to maintain a constant speed (the governor of that throttle notch) the Ammeter indicates the draw. The feedback is electro-magnetic, the reverse EMF, a frictionlike effect opposing change in speed. Dynamic brakes use the THAT to slow the train, when coupled the other way about.
    Typically the load current indicator is connected to indicate the field current through one of the traction motors. To calculate the output current you would have to multiply depending on what transition circuit the locomotive is in.

    dont forget - results may vary, every loco is different :P

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by norfolksouthern37 View Post
    Typically the load current indicator is connected to indicate the field current through one of the traction motors. To calculate the output current you would have to multiply depending on what transition circuit the locomotive is in.

    dont forget - results may vary, every loco is different :P
    AFAIK, that's three times in two days you've agreed with me... lighting's gonna strike one of us! Not sure why anyone would want to bother when driving in assessing the actual load current, but agree about the calculations needed. Perhaps they have to log it from time to time like a military (sailor's standing watch do a lot of that!) watchstander--I always thought the whole purpose was to make sure you were making your rounds. Recording the potable water levels in the tanks when tied up to the pier hooked up to shore services was a bit pointless... yet a part of two years of my life! Go Figure! // Frank

  5. #20
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    P = I * E
    E = I * R
    Substitute I * R for E gives the equation...........P = I * I * R....
    P = I>2 R
    Too bad Frank's not around any more,.........................I'd just love getting goody points from him!

    Apologize for waking up this old thread, but I was feeling mathematical this eve...................
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    You may, but are not obligated to, ignore this post!

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by steamboateng View Post
    P = I * E
    E = I * R
    Substitute I * R for E gives the equation...........P = I * I * R....
    P = I>2 R
    Too bad Frank's not around any more,.........................I'd just love getting goody points from him!

    Apologize for waking up this old thread, but I was feeling mathematical this eve...................
    I feel like I'm back in engineering classes again!
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  7. #22
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    If anyone can help? I'm having trouble with my traction motors, I go for maybe 1 hour then all my units say "Traction motor short-time shutdown" then all stop and I can't move. My train is over powered I think 3 on the head, 2 mid, and 2 on the rear. I've not had this problem before and I'm at a loss. I'd love any advise.

  8. #23
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    Question how to enable cab sounds

    Hi
    I want to enable cab sounds i.e throttle lever sound,reverser lever sound etc plzz tell m how i can enable these sounds.

    I have ge ac6000 cab
    I opened it for edit in explorer
    Then there is sound file which includes all sounds in .wav format. Still sounds are not enable in cab. Plzzz tell me how i can enable it????

  9. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by cag569 View Post
    If anyone can help? I'm having trouble with my traction motors, I go for maybe 1 hour then all my units say "Traction motor short-time shutdown" then all stop and I can't move. My train is over powered I think 3 on the head, 2 mid, and 2 on the rear. I've not had this problem before and I'm at a loss. I'd love any advise.
    My apologies for the delay.

    On prototypical locomotives, the ammeter used to have yellow and red sections, indicating not to use that much power for more than the time limit. If the engineer did, the traction motors would overheat and could be damaged. I suspect this function might be automated in today's units.

    The solution is to watch the ammeter and not let it go too high for too long. If you still have problems, you might need to add MORE units, not less.

    How big is the train you're operating?

  10. #25
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    Does the ammeter only work correctly in realistic mode? In easy mode, I have noticed that it usually doesn't register anything or is working but backwards (in the yellow). Is there xml code somewhere that can change the characteristics?

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  11. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by chili46 View Post
    Does the ammeter only work correctly in realistic mode? In easy mode, I have noticed that it usually doesn't register anything or is working but backwards (in the yellow). Is there xml code somewhere that can change the characteristics?

    As far as I know, the Ammeter in DCC mode cannot be changed to behave like if it was in "cab" mode.
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  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by ksnitzen View Post
    My apologies for the delay.

    On prototypical locomotives, the ammeter used to have yellow and red sections, indicating not to use that much power for more than the time limit. If the engineer did, the traction motors would overheat and could be damaged. I suspect this function might be automated in today's units.

    The solution is to watch the ammeter and not let it go too high for too long. If you still have problems, you might need to add MORE units, not less.

    How big is the train you're operating?
    Any idea what the time limit may be? - the only locomotive that I have seen give this warning is the ES44AC range with the "glass cockpit".

  13. #28
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    I love driving in "CAB" mode, controlling the locomotive control stand handles with my mouse.

    I do not use AI except to test automatic operations of my route.
    My apologies to all. I have decided that in these horrible current events, we all need to stick together as a Community

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