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Thread: CAB Mode Driving Tip - Diesel Locomotives

  1. #1
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    Default CAB Mode Driving Tip - Diesel Locomotives

    CAB Mode Driving Tip - Diesel Locomotives
    by Zec Murphy

    Most diesel electric locomotives in Trainz include a functioning interior view, which includes many controls and dials necessary to correctly drive a diesel locomotive. One of these is the ‘Ammeter’ dial. Using the ammeter, you can achieve maximum power correctly. The following is based off the method outlined in a Victorian Railways ‘Operating Instructions’ manual to achieve maximum power as soon as possible. This is achieved by “notching Up’ on the throttle lever, with the ammeter being used as a guide.


    When notching up, the needle/display will move around as the locomotive applies more power. When operating a goods/freight train, the throttle must immediately be advanced another notch when the ammeter needle has steadied. This is repeated until the throttle is in No. 8 position (when the locomotive uses 8 ‘power’ notches), this giving maximum power from the locomotive. To achieve best results, you must not pause unnecessarily long between notches.

    Maximum power will only be achieved in notch 8, and this should be your objective whenever starting away from a station or approaching a grade.

    When notching up with a train traveling at speed, after slack is taken up, or when operating a passenger train, you may notch up with only a slight pause between each notch, and without reference to the ammeter.

    This method, of course, should be varied depending on the track speed limit. If you train is already at the track speed limit, then you should not move the throttle any further, unless required to climb a grade.

  2. #2
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    hey do you know how to do the free cam mode thing on trainz 2012 ?? its like a command line you type in then you can just walk about the cab ??

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    You have to create your own Trainzoptions file, and type the lines in ... Someone else knows better than I do, on how, and where to place, a trainzopions file in TS12

  4. #4
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    In your Trainz install directory look in the UserData folder.
    Trainzoptions.txt is placed there. If missing add it with your favourite text editor.
    Add the following to Trainzoptions.txt:

    -freeintcam
    Jamie C.

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    Default LOADS IN TS12

    I have absoulutely no clue what I did but I cant get ANY loads to work on my rollingstock for TS12. does anyone know what to do?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by shadowarrior View Post
    CAB Mode Driving Tip - Diesel Locomotives
    by Zec Murphy

    Most diesel electric locomotives in Trainz include a functioning interior view, which includes many controls and dials necessary to correctly drive a diesel locomotive. One of these is the ‘Ammeter’ dial. Using the ammeter, you can achieve maximum power correctly. The following is based off the method outlined in a Victorian Railways ‘Operating Instructions’ manual to achieve maximum power as soon as possible. This is achieved by “notching Up’ on the throttle lever, with the ammeter being used as a guide.


    When notching up, the needle/display will move around as the locomotive applies more power. When operating a goods/freight train, the throttle must immediately be advanced another notch when the ammeter needle has steadied. This is repeated until the throttle is in No. 8 position (when the locomotive uses 8 ‘power’ notches), this giving maximum power from the locomotive. To achieve best results, you must not pause unnecessarily long between notches.

    Maximum power will only be achieved in notch 8, and this should be your objective whenever starting away from a station or approaching a grade.

    When notching up with a train traveling at speed, after slack is taken up, or when operating a passenger train, you may notch up with only a slight pause between each notch, and without reference to the ammeter.

    This method, of course, should be varied depending on the track speed limit. If you train is already at the track speed limit, then you should not move the throttle any further, unless required to climb a grade.
    This makes sense because the ammeter is placed in series between the generator and the traction motors. If one were to draw too much power too soon or at once, while coming from a stop or going into a steep grade, this could blow something and damage the motors. By watching the current draw on the power system, then it's easier to tell if too much load is being put on the engine and power system.

    John
    John
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  7. #7

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    saw this and had to ask. As I recall, the Ammeter is also used as a guide to avoiding what I'll call for the time being, unnecessary or dangerous power usage? IE, if you're pushing you're locomotive too hard in some manner particularly going up grades or starting, you're likely to end up with any number of unwanted scenarios, from wheel slippage, to broken couplers, to blow turbos/cooked circuits (Not that these can't happen anyway, but probably not because you're pushing your engine too hard).... The ammeter is as close as you get in a diesel to a real time "Status Report" on the your Power's progress in pulling or starting whatever load you're hauling, and would replace what steam engineers basically had to do by sound and touch (Hearing how hard the cylinders are working, or feeling them vibrate through the frame).

    Of course, thats just my understanding, hence the question, and feel free to correct me if I'm wrong...
    Falcus

  8. #8

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    Think you're right. Some of Jointedrail's locomotives are also scripted to fail when pushed too hard for too long.

  9. #9
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    This is what one of my books says about how to read the ampere meter

    Code:
    Load Current Indicating Meter:
    
    The Locomotive pulling force is indicated by the load current
    indicating meter. This meter is graduated to read amperes of
    electrical current, with 1500 being the maximum reading on the
    scale. The meter is connected so as to indicate the current flowing
    through the No.2 Motor (under the cab). Since the amparage is the same
    in all motors, each motor will carry the same amount shown on the 
    meter. Since the motors receive the power from the
    main generator, the meter readings may be multiplied to determine
    the approximate generator current output. The multiplying
    factor will depend, however, on the particular transition
    circuit in effect at the time the reading is taken. For example,
    when operating in a series-parallel circuit, the multiplying factor
    is 3, in parallel it is 6.
    
    Thus a meter reading of 200 amperes would indicate a generator
    output of 600 amperes when operating in series-parallel or
    alternatively 1200 amperes in parallel.
    Also, as a note the ampere meter is also effected by frame rates since SP1.

    Cheers.

  10. #10
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    I'm a marine engineer, certainly not railroad qualified by any stretch if the imagination............but, after reading the above statement,.............. however!
    It seems to me that allowing series operation of traction motors is an invitation to catastrophe. Please correct me if I'm wrong..........but I would think some serious current limiting circuits would be installed 'tween generator and motors!
    Simple Ohm's Law calculations state in a series circuit all current demanded by the load passes equally through each load, the voltage is divided proportionately amongst the various loads. In a parallel circuit, the voltage is equal across each load, and the current divided proportionately through each load. In a properly designed circuit the generator(s) would be designed to provide maximum draw current at a specified voltage. To my simple knowledge; all power circuits are wired in parallel. General power calculations are simple enough.........volts x amps x power factor = watts...........746 watts = 1 horsepower.
    There is a big difference in reading current depending on how the motors are wired to the current source. With two (or more) motors wired in series, no matter what, the ammeter will always read the full current draw on the load, i.e. all motors. An ammeter wired in series to a motor which in turn is wired parallel to the source generator, will read the current drawn by that motor alone. All things being equal, multiplying the number of motors so connected will give an indication of full load current; i.e. horsepower. An ammeter wired in series with any distribution leg of the parallel circuit will indicate the full load draw for that circuit. Of course it all gets a little more complicated with A.C. and more so with 3-phase circuits, but the fundamental elements remain intact.
    I hope this cleared it all-up!
    Trainz 2012 Engineers Edition: build 61388
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  11. #11
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    Hi Steamboateng,

    Here's a diagram showing the circuits and how the motors are setup

    http://i134.photobucket.com/albums/q...ps441977da.jpg

    For this diagram the max voltage is 600 and the continuous amperage output is 2200, transition fields control the amount of amps (used for power/heavy pulling) and voltage (used for speed/low power).

    Cheers.

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    Just for interest - The ampmeters have colour bands with time limits on the scales in real life , green yellow and red if I remember correctly, that the drivers adhere to. Stalling occurs when t/motor armatures stand still for too long under load and armatures get cooked any many other bad conditions occur. There are many built-in mechanical and electrical devices to protect the locomotives under normal operating conditions but abuse , negligence and ignorance still causes much damage.
    Should one 'wipe' the throttle from 1-8 the governor mechanically controls the revs and power pickup is smooth , some diesel engines bog down though but this is not good and normal practice anyway as someone has already stated.
    Certain locos are natural GT's and can pull away faster than some cars
    World peace is a bit far off, lets work at Trainz peace for now

  13. #13
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    That control system is sooooooo old..........Yikes!
    The series coils are meant to retard the current build up to the motor fields, wired 3 x 2 parallel circuits initially, and 2 x 3 parallel circuits once the engine is moving. The parallel shunt resistor/coil circuit is meant to limit current as the loco comes up to speed. The shunt/coil combination will vary as the loco gains speed. Ideally the shunt resistors will drop out completely at design speed and the only impedance/resistance in the circuit will be that of the motor coils themselves. The schematic, scanty as it is, smells of a D.C. controller. A.C. controllers were not efficiently perfected until the digital age; due to their complexity and footprint. A.C. controllers regulate motor synchronous frequency, i.e speed. D.C. motors, although less efficient, are controlled by field excitation: read brute magnetic force; and are ideal for the variable speed conditions which a loco must work through.
    Trainz 2012 Engineers Edition: build 61388
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    You may, but are not obligated to, ignore this post!

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    I know! You're gonna spout about Pennsylvania and New Haven electrics.
    Unless you know what comes out of your wall socket.........please don't!
    Trainz 2012 Engineers Edition: build 61388
    TaNE build 82718
    You may, but are not obligated to, ignore this post!

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Falcus View Post
    saw this and had to ask. As I recall, the Ammeter is also used as a guide to avoiding what I'll call for the time being, unnecessary or dangerous power usage? IE, if you're pushing you're locomotive too hard in some manner particularly going up grades or starting, you're likely to end up with any number of unwanted scenarios, from wheel slippage, to broken couplers, to blow turbos/cooked circuits (Not that these can't happen anyway, but probably not because you're pushing your engine too hard).... The ammeter is as close as you get in a diesel to a real time "Status Report" on the your Power's progress in pulling or starting whatever load you're hauling, and would replace what steam engineers basically had to do by sound and touch (Hearing how hard the cylinders are working, or feeling them vibrate through the frame).

    Of course, thats just my understanding, hence the question, and feel free to correct me if I'm wrong...
    Falcus
    This makes sense as the ammeter measures current draw on the motors.

    Here's the complete Ohm's Law, which I haven't dealt with in close to 35 years as a technician, and mostly while taking circuit analysis classes in college!

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ohm%27s_law

    Current, as measured in amperes using an ammeter, is directly proportional to the amount of voltage and resistance in a circuit. So if the voltage goes up, in relation to the resistance which stays the same, then the current will increase. Increasing the resistance, also in relation to the same voltage level, will lower the current, however, decreasing it will increase the amount of current.

    John
    John
    Trainz User Since: 12-2003
    Trainz User ID: 124863
    T:ANE Build: 94829
    TRS2019: 98592

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