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Thread: What drives the operation of a railroad?

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by afifaadam View Post
    The operation of the railway is via a control system,basically by mechanical means, but now more commonally electronic and computerized.
    There are still many places that have no signaling or any other physical controls - called dark territory. Control is maintained with Track Warrants or Train Orders and Time Tables. These are written documents that state the terms under which a train has rights to be on a given section of track. This requires thinking on the part of of the train crew and not just stop or go based on the color of a light. We have yet to develop these "dark territory" controls in Trainz, but given time . . .

    And thanks for resurrecting this thread. Guess I need to write and post the next chapter.

    David
    Dap, Newton & Northwestern RR
    Boone, Rockwell City & Northwestern RR
    Marshalltown & Dakota RR
    Boone Valley Coal & Rwy Co.

  2. #32
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    What drives the operation of a railroad is profit, money, revenue, and an economy ... if people are not buying goods, a Company can't stay in business, and they will ship their goods via truck, or close their doors ... they just don't run a train so that railfans can say: "Ooooo That looks cool" !

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by cascaderailroad View Post
    In Trainz, a RR should have a purpose, at least 2 terminus, and should go somewhere, and perform a task ... and shold not just a run on to nowhere, an endless purposeless route.
    Too bad that would cause a lot of problems. Starting with operational efficiency, performance impacts, finding enough content, and ultimately the creator themselves. It takes a lot of time, research, effort and in certain cases, money. That's why I create several different sections of my fictional routes and although they may not have many or any terminal and look like a road to nowhere, it actually, in the grand scheme of things, does put two and two together and satisfy the criteria.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by boc61 View Post
    One thing you have to take in account here in the States is that since the end of WWII, we have become a car centric nation. After the war, gas was cheap and plentiful, and cars were cheap and plentiful as manufacturers ramped up production. As more highways were built, especially the Interstate system Americans took to driving as their primary means of transportation. Owning a car became part of the American dream, almost a birthright. In a country where some States take hours or even days to drive through, the car became king. You could leave when you wanted, take any route you wanted, and stop anyplace you wanted. Americans love convenience and freedom and the car gave us that, beyond anything the railroads could ever do. Couple that with bad business practices by the railroads themselves, and government policies that were not conducive to the railroads benefit and it pretty much sealed the fate of the railroads.

    Even today, we still would rather get into our cars as opposed to riding a train or other mass transit service. I live about 40 miles from New York City. By train it's from 90 minutes to 2 hours depending on if I have to make a connection. If I am headed into the city for a leisurely day, I will usually take the train. But if time is of the essence, I'm going to get in my car and drive and I can be there in under an hour. I can leave whenever I want, and not be bound by a timetable.

    When I travel to Europe, I admire and envy even the public transportation systems. But here, it's a different story, I don't ever see it getting anywhere near the "golden days" of yore. Never mind needing the infrastructure, culturally it's just not something we would embrace on the whole, not to mention the influences of the oil and automobile industries bent on maintaining their footholds.
    It's getting more difficult to achieve that though. In fact in big cities it can take up to an hour just get from one side to the other and that's with optimal conditions. On the topic of infrastructure if ours continues to crumble, then railroads just might have an opportunity to get back in the game. As the oil is concerned, it's not that serious as well rely heavily on foreign oil so that's not something to be worried about. Not to mention in California a lot of people are relying on mass transit and rail with gas prices being so darn high as is the case with everything else here sadly. There's opportunities it's just a matter of marketing and providing. Americans are stubborn and loyal to a fault. We are strong minded and don't like changing our ways even when bad things happen due to our unwillingness to change. Like with the airline industry. It amazes me people still use airports like they do yet complain about the fees, inconveniences, restrictions as to what can be brought on board and so much more. I mean let's not even bring up the piss poor amenities or lack thereof on the planes once you get on.

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