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Thread: Extreme Weather, Heat Wave, Forest Fire Condition, Flood activity in your area ?

  1. #106
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    Here's the latest North American Model:

    http://weather.rap.ucar.edu/model/di...=loopall&hours=

    These are the mid-level surface winds which shows storm motion very nicely. According to this somewhat broad model, it appears things have finally calmed down and will start warming up, finally. Look at the northward moving dotted line. This is the Jetstream and it's obvious that it's finally retreating back to the Arctic as things are warming up. It will fluctuate all season with some dips into the south, but it will be met with the warm air as it pushes northward. This north-pushing air will bring moisture and severe storms as the Midwest heats up in the spring.

    John
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  2. #107
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    John:

    I forgot to mention torrential rains. We had 7 inches in 3 or 4 hours last week. Record is 26 inches in 24 hours (26 in 24 is not a typo). Stalled front that just trained over us hour after hour after hour. I had 6 inches of water in my house. Folks not too far away had 4 feet. Price we pay for living in a sub-tropical environment. I once had a motorcycle with a 6-cylinder engine that was so wide cylinders 1 and 6 were not under the gas tank. It rained so hard it put 1 and 6 out - I was running on 2, 3, 4, and 5 only (not very smoothly either).

    Something that had always bothered me: If its snowbird season - why can't we shoot them, lol?

    Cascadia fault up your way perhaps?

    Ben
    Trestle Man

  3. #108
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    Snowbirds.... We send them your way, Ben.

    They migrate up and down from Maine and drive on I-95 and I-495 both of which are not too far from my house. They must take a whole season to make the trip because they're doing all of 45 mph on the highway tying up traffic.

    I wonder why shooting them isn't allowed, sometimes.

    I heard about that rain. It was pretty vicious.

    John Kinzel has the Cascadia fault out his way...

    The other John
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  4. #109
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    And we send them back to you when the weather warms up.

    Ben
    Trestle Man

  5. #110
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    In Sayre Pa there once was too much snow from an ongoing blizzard, and all the Snowbunnies from NY ski slopes, totally took over the local 3 story hotel. The night manager called the PA State Police, and said: "Help we need help" ... The police said that the roads were closed, and all access was cut off, and they would have to shelter in place, as even a helicopter was grounded by the blizzard. The frantic hotel night manager described the scene: "People are having a huge party on the top floor, and are taking all the plants up the elevator, and it looks like a Tarzan movie set jungle up there" ... "Are they breaking anything" ? ... "No ... But they are all neck-ed and running around like Adam & Eve up there" ... (snickers heard in the police barracks) "I'm sorry to hear that sir, please call back when you have a problem that needs our immediate attention, the blizzard is so bad that nothing gets in or out".

  6. #111
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    Sounds like a hurricane party with colder weather, lol.

    Ben
    Trestle Man

  7. #112
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    John: Interesting map, thanks.

    Yep, the Cascadia fault, aka the "big one" when it lets go. I hope not in my life time. There are all kinds of faults running through the Puget Sound region and as you can tell by the map they are constantly moving. Very seldom do we feel anything unless it's in the range of 2.5 to 3 or higher and most are quite deep.

    Ben, That's a lot of rain! Think I might be putting the house on stilts. We really don't get as much rain as we let on up here, but we can get two to three days in a row of just cloudy, misty drizzle. Drives the trans-planted Californians nuts. By March even I'm getting a little tired of it.

    Regards,

    John

  8. #113
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    Hi John:

    I've been to Seattle twice for 2 weeks at a time and yes it rains a lot but not heavy. More of a misty drizzle then a frog choker like we get. Pretty country though - I went to Snoqualmie Falls. Worth the trip (not many waterfalls in Florida).

    Wait until Yellowstone goes boom. Nothing left west of the Mississippi (and its 40,000 years overdue, lol).

    Ben
    Trestle Man

  9. #114
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    That would exterminate the earth, from no photosynthesis for decades, due to blocking out the suns light ... even if you had a zillion cans of spam ... the Yellowstone magma cauldron is no joke

  10. #115
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    Well not a total extinction level event as its happened several times in the past and life is still here. Would definitely screw things up worldwide though. There was a neat article in National Geographic Magazine a few years ago on the subject of the Yellowstone super volcano and one map showed the eruptions for the last 2,500,000 years. The hot spot in the mantle that causes Yellowstone is pretty much fixed in position and the north American tectonic plate is slowly moving west over it so the eruptions appear to be moving east. Last time it went boom there wasn't much left west of the Mississippi river except varying depths of ash. 70,000 years ago a different super volcano went boom in Indonesia and almost wiped out the human race. We were down to our last 4000 folks. Human DNA should show a large amount of genetic diversity but it doesn't. There is an extreme bottleneck 70,000 years ago. So we are all cousins or some sort from those 4000 folks who survived.
    640,000 years ago when it last went boom there were no humans in North America but the plant and animal populations took a major hit. Today fatalities would almost certainly be in the multi-millions and the agricultural effects would be world wide but not to the extent of human extinction. Like the Cascadia fault its not a matter of if but of when.

    Cheery subject isn't it, lol?

    Ben
    Trestle Man

  11. #116
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    Lovely cheery it is!

    Another fault they've been watching a bit more in earnest is the New Madrid fault located along the Mississippi River in town in MO.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Madrid_Seismic_Zone

    Overall even us Northeasterners aren't completely immune from earthquakes. In the mid 1700s, there was a strong one that caused damage in Boston and felt as far south as New York City and Virginia. This occurred up off the coast of Gloucester, MA and is known as the Cape Anne Earthquake.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1755_Cape_Ann_earthquake

    This quake destroyed a town located only a few miles from where I live today. West Newbury and Newbury lost many houses due to fires as the chimneys collapsed. For many years the area was desolate with only a few houses, and eventually some twenty years later the houses were rebuilt. This explains why there are so many brick late Georgian and Federalist style houses in that town compared to the earlier wooden homes located in the surrounding towns of Groveland (Rowley at the time), Newburyport, Haverhill, and Salisbury. When people moved back, they decided to use a much more solid building material and used bricks, which they probably purchased from the brick makers located in Haverhill. Haverhill at that time was known for brickmaking instead of shoes which came much later.

    In 2009 I was at UMass Lowell taking a geology class and wrote a paper on this quake. Sadly, I no longer have the paper due to a major hard drive crash, otherwise I would have some more details on this event.

    John
    Last edited by JCitron; March 9th, 2015 at 09:15 PM.
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  12. #117
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    Winter Storm Helena has just hit us earlier today. We got a light dusting of snow on the ground. However, the real snow will be coming down overnight. We've got a Winter Storm Warning until 1:00PM Saturday. We'll be getting about 1 TO 2 INCHES of snow, sleet, freezing rain, winds 15 to 25 Miles per Hour, and gusts up to 30 Miles per Hour. We're at 31 degrees now, though it feels like 22 degrees. However, it'll drop down to about 21 tonight, then sunny with a high of 29 and a low of 16 tomorrow; mostly cloudy with a high of 34 and a low of 21 on Sunday; mostly cloudy with a high of 41 and a low of 30 Monday; finally, the temps will be above freezing on Tuesday, cloudy with 53 as the high and 48 as the low. Already Georgia's under a State of Emergency, I've seen three tow trucks, two with cars on them, and two crashes on the way home today (they let me go home early due to the weather). I saw the road crews out de-icing the roads also. Here's hoping that I get a call tomorrow saying I don't have to come in. Whitfield County Schools cancelled school for today, which my mom was happy about, since she's a teacher, and my dad was able to come home early today also.
    Owner of Freeman Locomotive Works.

  13. #118
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    We're getting the same storm tomorrow. It's staying mostly south so Cape Cod is getting the brunt with 9-inches plus. We're predicted to get 3-6 inches, which means we will get closer to 6 inches or more - we never get less.

    The reason we're seeing less snow than the Cape is because the storm is heading across Cape Cod and the Islands instead of heading up to the Gulf of Maine. With the storm out to sea, it will pick up the warmer water temperature and turn any precipitation to snow, and because the storm is so far south, we'll see much less with Central Mass and Western Mass seeing an inch or less - though it was updated to 1 to 3 inches today for them.

    There's no worries for us going anywhere. I'm retired, dad and mom are elders and bro works at home, besides it's happening on the weekend. If worst came to worst, we could always walk to the market which is located a mile from my house.

    But alas, it's winter, and winter brings snow and ice. You wouldn't know that by the way the news media acts. According to them this will be yet again BREAKING NEWS!!!! because it's snowing. Three months from now, we'll have peeper frogs, leopard frogs, thunderstorms and severe weather followed by high humidity and awful heat.

    Thanks for the bump.
    John
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  14. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCitron View Post

    Thanks for the bump.
    Anytime. Also, we've finally got enough snow to where I'm able to get a fistful of snow from outside to my Mom's bedroom and throw it at her. Next thing I know, she's taking that snow and shoving it down the back of my shirt!
    Owner of Freeman Locomotive Works.

  15. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by jordon412 View Post
    Anytime. Also, we've finally got enough snow to where I'm able to get a fistful of snow from outside to my Mom's bedroom and throw it at her. Next thing I know, she's taking that snow and shoving it down the back of my shirt!
    Have fun. When I was young I used to sled down a big hill we used to call Green Hill. It was after all green and full of cows in the summer. The snow would get so deep it would be like wading through drifts. It could've been that I was 8 years old so the snow seemed a lot deeper than it really was, but not necessarily. This was the aftermath of the 1968-69 snowstorm which was quite an unbelievable Nor'easter. I remember the thunder snow and lightning during the storm and my dad going out the next day and shoveling snow off the roof.

    We don't get as much snow like that, though a few years ago we got dumped on pretty well, but those storms are an exception now.

    I don't have an aversion to the white stuff, but I don't like it now that I have to drive in it, though my doctor says stay home and safe because I fall too easily. Hehe, it's a good excuse to stay in. Snow as much as it's a pain is really beneficial. It acts as a reserve for water as it holds up the moisture and releases it slowly in the springtime into the reservoirs. Last year we ended up with a severe drought and very low water supplies because there was also very little snow in the previous winter.
    John
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