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Thread: Tips and Tricks-Surveyor

  1. #16
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    Lightbulb Track Laying Tips for Yards.

    I got a couple of ideas as I been fiddling around with Yards as of late.

    First when Laying a Yard out, do each half of a double ended yard with Track running in one direction then do the same for the opposite end. so that the track will look like this

    <---------------:-------------------->


    That way your trackmarks will be facing in Opposite directions and will make it easier for AI Trains to move to the proper ends of the yard

    Also as a Naming Convention, Try to use a Formate like this

    N-S or E-W (Yard) Trk (#) NB-SB or EB-WB for your trackmarks that way you have things in nice and neat order when your want your AI Trains to Drive to or Drive Via a Certain Track mark.

    Just an idea here..

    Tucsoncoyote--

  2. #17
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    Default

    The most obvious reason why there are parts of poor coverage on Google and Microsoft Earth are of course...Clouds! That and Area 51 Anyway, another tip...If you have a large area such as a Town a Forest or a Major Road to build, make up a "Works Yard" on an empty baseboard.Go through EVERY type of House , Tree or Road Bridge and put one example of each in the Works Yard so that you can compare them all and use the best ones.You"ll often forget what Content you have available, and this is a good reminder.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by lewisner View Post
    ... through EVERY type of House , Tree or Road Bridge and put one example of each ...
    You actually go that working?

    Once I tried something like that and
    1) no room to put everything,
    2) needed to label them all or I would never remember where I got them from
    3) it took almost forever to load


    70337:
    TRS19 build 100240 and 103369 Win10 Pro 64 bit, i7-7700 3.6GHz 16 GB, GTX 1070 Ti

  4. #19
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    Default Limited version of "Works Yard" tip worked well for me...

    I'm very new to Trainz, and I tried my own version of lewisner's "Works Yard" tip a few weeks ago. I needed a certain type of trestle, and was having trouble visualizing the ones that came with the software (as well as a few I'd just downloaded). So, I made two separate baseboard routes, and installed half of my bridges on each. That gave me a way to look over my bridges, as well as understand the little quirks of each.

    As for the downsides - yes, martinvk has some good points:
    1) no room to put everything
    My solution was not to try to put EVERYTHING into one route, but to make separate, categorized routes with only one type of objects, and no more than 100 or so of those per route. I named the routes according to the type of objects that are installed on each ("Bridges 01", "Bridges 02", etc.).

    2) needed to label them all or I would never remember where I got them from
    I just use the "Get Object" tool to click on the object I'm intrested in - I found no need for separate labels.

    3) it took almost forever to load
    Not a problem if you limit yourself to only one type of object per route (and limit the number) as listed above.

    I suspect this tip is most useful for new users like me... it provided a great opportunity to become familiar with the limited number of assets that came built-in with Trainz (plus the hundred-odd ones I've downloaded so far). Someone with lot's more experience (like martinvk) must have zillions of assets by now, and probably knows all their quirks pretty well, so building a bunch of "Works Yard" routes wouldn't be worth the effort.

  5. #20
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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by titaniclover View Post
    well i was thinking there are a lot of tips and trick using surveyor so i decided to start this thread.
    here post you tips and Tricks you use to create layout in surveyor.
    and can be abotu terrain, textures anything!
    i would hope that this help new layout creators to create faboluos routes using the technices.
    ill start.
    a simple tip use the rotation tool for textures in big areas not small.
    A very useful service

  6. #21
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    Martinvk , you"ve caught me making a howler! What I meant was to build up a Yard of the ones you actually want to use.You don"t need to label them since the idea is to have them there so you can click "Get Object" so you can get them repeatedly without having to Search.Anyways heres another Tip:- When you want to use AI to couple a Locomotive to a Train/Consist in a Siding the Locomotive will drive at Line Speed as far as the points for the siding and then at 1 MPH until it reaches the Train.This can be tiresome if the siding is very long , SO what you do is 1) decide on a place (call it the Coupling Point) where the last vehicle in the Train/Consist will stand, this being the vehicle the Loco will couple to.About 5 yards from the Coupling Point pace a Signal Invisible on the track so that the AI Driver can see it as he approaches the Train.Then place an Invisible 5 0r 10 MPH Speed Limit on the entry to the siding , and (leaving the Siding )a Speed Limit for whatever your Line Speed is.Now when the Loco enters the Siding it will drive at 5 or 10 MPH till it reaches the Signal Invisible (a few yards from the Train) and slow down to 1 MPH before coupling.This works like a charm for me.
    Last edited by lewisner; February 21st, 2007 at 05:45 PM. Reason: Punctuation

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrockey View Post
    ...


    Not a problem if you limit yourself to only one type of object per route (and limit the number) as listed above.

    I suspect this tip is most useful for new users like me... it provided a great opportunity to become familiar with the limited number of assets that came built-in with Trainz (plus the hundred-odd ones I've downloaded so far). Someone with lot's more experience (like martinvk) must have zillions of assets by now, and probably knows all their quirks pretty well, so building a bunch of "Works Yard" routes wouldn't be worth the effort.
    Good point about having a limited selection. Much easier to manage and use when looking for something special.

    Thanks for the laurel. I really don't have zillions. In fact, it was only during the first year after I got Trainz that I would download many objects, few of which ever really got used, I might add. Then I started making things with GMax. Now whenever I need a new object, I generally make it myself. One it's fun to do and second, it will be exactly as I want it. Thus, finding it is not an issue since, I named it and I don't have zillions of similar objects cluttering the selection list.

    By now most of the unused downloads have been removed and I've disabled many of the built-in objects too, so I don't have to wade through a load of unwanted names to find the ones I want.


    70337:
    TRS19 build 100240 and 103369 Win10 Pro 64 bit, i7-7700 3.6GHz 16 GB, GTX 1070 Ti

  8. #23
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    Wink One of everything, never enough!

    I took different stuctures and combined them to make different buildings, sometimes mulipules of the same, or combinations of seperate items; try it!
    Last edited by American_Connections; February 21st, 2007 at 06:44 PM. Reason: spelling

  9. #24
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    Default

    Here's one I used today:

    What if you are laying the track for a prototypical yard and the track is at an angle to the gridlines, there is large spaces between each set of tracks, making it very hard to get the track straight across the yard (assuming the track splines are not located near each other)?

    Solution: Pick a large building from the objects menu that is rectangular and use the edge of the building as a "ruler" to keep each track straight in relation to the others.

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by leader2302 View Post
    Here's one I used today:

    What if you are laying the track for a prototypical yard and the track is at an angle to the gridlines, there is large spaces between each set of tracks, making it very hard to get the track straight across the yard (assuming the track splines are not located near each other)?

    Solution: Pick a large building from the objects menu that is rectangular and use the edge of the building as a "ruler" to keep each track straight in relation to the others.
    Or you could use something like an Angle Guide 70337:23019
    The two side bars (green and red) are 4m apart. The end is somewhere past 10km
    and it can be rotated to any angle.


    70337:
    TRS19 build 100240 and 103369 Win10 Pro 64 bit, i7-7700 3.6GHz 16 GB, GTX 1070 Ti

  11. #26
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    hmmm all i use is a ruler...that works...
    heres a tip
    name juctions to tell what track it is.
    Ex: a run through track going from East to West. the west junction to the run trough track can be called WRT and the East ERT.
    oh and i noticed a pattern in classification yards
    most think it is a single sper going off into all the tracks. its real much different. they are cluster of 5 or more tracks.
    this i have noticed while lokking at plans of a yard.
    also yards major on e consist of 5 things.
    -Receiving yard
    -Classification Yard
    -depature Yard
    -local yard
    -service tracks
    these all help the yard function.
    cars go to the recieving yard to the classification to the depature yard. the first yard ever to have this was Dewitt Yard in East Syracuse follow the tracks from old plans you sac easily run from one end to the other in this manner.
    service track is where bad cars and locos are fixed.
    local yard holds car used for local service at industries.
    another good thing to have is a storge area to store extra cars.
    this is all i got. for now.....
    now anymore? i havent seen many of the good creators out there post here.
    Last edited by titaniclover; February 22nd, 2007 at 09:05 PM. Reason: more stuff
    73's,
    Adam Wiethuechter; KC2RXO

  12. #27
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    Default COOL!!

    If you do that and lay them on the gridlines hold shift then the splines won't click together and track can be layed anywhere using the shift trick.
    Happy Trainzing!!!
    The Kool Kid - TKK


  13. #28
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    Default double and quad tracks

    You have double and even quad tracks in your route but don't like to use the double track splines. Then when you use two or more single tracks, it's hard to keep them parallel and aligned.

    Try using a pair of my track guides. Here is an example using 70337:23083
    Place two guides facing each other. place one single track from one guide toward the other (first pair on the left) Place a second single track from the second back towards the first (second pair fro the left). Now you have a double track made of two single tracks (third pair from the left). As you move the guides, the track bends and stretches between them (fourth and fifth pair from the left) Pull them 12m, 120m even 1200m apart and the two tracks stay parallel and aligned. You can do the same thing with three and even four tracks (last pair on the right) using other guides. There are guides for 3.5m, 4m and 5m spacing too.


    And here is what it looks like in Driver. Note that the pushpins are only visible in Surveyer to make them easier to find and move / rotate.


    A closeup of the guide in Driver

    If you have placed and set the World Origin, the coordinates of the center between the two concrete blocks (where the pushpin is in Surveyor) is shown on the board.

    Now you have all the advantages of single track, direction, choice of rail, etc. in a multi-track environment.


    70337:
    TRS19 build 100240 and 103369 Win10 Pro 64 bit, i7-7700 3.6GHz 16 GB, GTX 1070 Ti

  14. #29
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    Thumbs up

    martinvk, Thanks for this ingenious solution.
    There are some really clever devils out there

  15. #30

    Default

    Cool, how do i get that?

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