.
Page 488 of 491 FirstFirst ... 388438478486487488489490 ... LastLast
Results 7,306 to 7,320 of 7361

Thread: Japan

  1. #7306

    Default

    Fantastic pictures everyone!! Pagroov your route is really coming along fine!! What trees did you use? they look great!! As for me, I've come full circle with the Green Line route. The Sunrise city terminal is now complete, I've done some track work for the bullet train yard and fixed up the Nikodan station a bit. This month I seek to complete the Red Line. Take care everyone.

  2. #7307
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Italy, Lombardia, Lodi
    Posts
    567
     

    Default

    More Keio stuff now available on my website! This time it's the turn of the 7000 Series!



    The 7000 Series was introduced in the mid-1980s to replace the last surviving pre-1960s "green trains" on local services thruought the Keio network.
    These so-called "green trains" (due to the all-over green livery they carried), such as the 2000 Series, had been introduced in the post-war years and had been built until the late 1950s, and had been all displaced to local services in the 1970s, with the introduction of the 6000 Series. A solid decade later, Keio railway finally put down plans for the introduction of a new type of train dedicated to local services.

    Originally envisioned as a direct derivative, if not an identical train with only a few differences from the 6000 Series, however the design evolved over time into an entirely different train. A key change was in the bodyshell material, with Keio opting to abandon the conventional steel it had used until then in favour of a stainless steel bodyshell, wich was rapidly becoming the new standard for all Japanese railways, from major private railways to the JNR.
    Otherwise, the 7000 Series retained many fetaures from the 6000 Series, including the same dimensions, overall shape and, most importantly, the same traction and other technical equipment such as bogeys, so as to match the two trains' performance as best as possible and to simplify maintainance.

    A first batch of Keio's new local train was delivered between March and November 1984, replacing the last remaining 2000 Series sets in service, consisting of ten 5-car sets with intermediate cars manufactured by Nippon Sharyo and cab cars manufactured by Tokyu Car Co. These were followed suit by two identical sets delivered in March 1986.
    Another batch of three trains was delivered between October and November 1988, this time formed as 8-car sets (again, jointly manufactured by Nippon Sharyo and Tokyu Car), and finally twelve intermediate pantograph cars were delivered in March 1987 to lenghten the twelve 5-car sets to six cars.

    Another five 8-car sets were delivered between November 1987 and December 1991; unlike the previous sets, these ones were of an improved and simplified design, such as using an updated construction techique using lightweight reinforced stainless steel sheets, eliminating the need for side corrugations, and having a cream-coloured FRP front mask of a simplified design. All five of these sets had also been jointly manufactured by Tokyu and Nippon Sharyo, except the last one, delivered in 1991, wich had been built by Nippon Sharyo only.
    For clarity, i'll refer to the pre-1987 trains as the "1st batch", and the post-1987 ones as the "newer" trains.

    The first two trains of this batch, that had been delivered in November and December 1987, fetaured two red "whiskers" on the front, between the front windows and the destination board. These were later quickly removed when the other sets in the batch (wich did not have them) entered service. Likewise, the unpainted cab cars of the 1st batch sets were all repainted in a cream colour around 1988 to match the newer trains.

    Between 1990 and 1992 seven of the 6-car sets of the 1st batch were lenghtened again, this time to eight cars, by adding two newly-built cars in each set.
    The remaining five sets instead remained formed as 6-car sets, intended to be used togheter to form 10-car sets with five matching 7000 Series 4-car sets delivered in 1993.

    One year later, in 1994, five 2-car 7000 Series sets were introduced for the first time, intended to be used coupled to 8-car sets to form 10-car sets during rush hour, a practice that was already well in place with the 6000 Series, and finally, between February and March 1996, the last 7000 Series cars were delivered, consisting of 10 intermediate cars intended to permanently lenghten five 8-car sets to ten cars.

    By then, Keio's 7000 Series had reached a quite sizeable 190 cars, formed as either 10-car, 8-car, 6-car, 4-car and 2-car sets. Around the same time some modifications to the existing trains were made, with a front skirt being added to all trains by 1992, and in 2002 the whole fleet was repainted in Keio's new magenta and blue livery.

    The early 2000s saw modifications continue, with two surplus 4-car sets being modified and assigned as reserve for the Doubutsuen Line, and at the same time two 2-car sets were likewise modified and assigned as reserve for the Kebajo Line.
    Conversion from the shunt-chopper system to an up-to-date IGBT-VVVF inverter began in 2003 for some sets (indistinctively between 1st batch and newer trains) and carried on until 2012, coinciding with a general interior refurbishment for the whole fleet, wich included the fitting of new seating, automated announcments and LCD passenger information displays. Some sets (overlapping with the VVVF-conversion sets) were also fitted with a single-arm pantograph in lieu of the standard diamond one starting from 2005.

    In 2010 a general reformation of the fleet was carried out, with 8-car trains being reformed into 10-car sets or 6-car sets.

    With the definitive retirement of the 6000 Series in 2011, 7000 Series trains began regular service on the Kebajo and Doubutsuen Lines since January and March 2011 respectively, with one-man-converted 7000 Series trains operating as 4-car or 2-car shuttles.

    As of today, the vast majority of 7000 Series trains, 160 out of 190 cars built, are still in service thruought Keio's 1372mm network, and altough there isn't a definitive replacement plan yet, some retirements and scrappings have already begun, among the 30 cars currently scrapped figure three entire sets (of 10, 8 and 6 cars respectively), made redundant by the introduction of the newer 5000 Series, and miscellaneous intermediate cars surplus from the shortening of the 8-car sets to six cars.
    Specifically, Keio's 7000 Series fleet is currently formed of five six-car sets, nine 10-car sets, seven 4-car sets (five of wich usually used togheter with the 6-car sets and the other two assigned to the Doubutsuen Line) and five 2-car sets (two of wich assigned to the Kebajo Line).

  3. #7308

    Default


  4. #7309

    Default


  5. #7310
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Italy, Lombardia, Lodi
    Posts
    567
     

    Default

    Well, since today's my birthday, i decided to make myself a present - here's my favourite train from a major private railway - Keio's 8000 Series!



    Already available on my website!


    By the late 1980s, with most of the extensions to the Sagamihara Line (and by extension to the whole of Keio's railway network) nearing completion, Keio Railway began to look into a modernization program for the whole company.
    At the time, despite the increasing ridership and copious purchases of new rolling stock, Keio Railway still remained a somewheat old-fashioned company, still retaining some obsolete practices and a general overall "old" look to it's stations and especially rolling stock.

    Thus, in 1989 the "Refreshing Keio" program was launched: the company was structured, a new logo was created, the company's busses and taxis were repainted into a new livery of "Keio Red" (altough closer to Magenta) with a thin "Keio Blue" line, a computerized information system was implemented, new uniforms were introduced and new line colors were applied.
    However, the centerpiece of the "Refreshing Keio" program was to be a new train series wich, for the first time in Keio's history, was intended to cover all services equally well, from locals to limited expresses, on all of Keio's 1372mm gauge lines.

    Part of the necessity of such a modernization plan was also likely due to the increasing promotion by the newly-formed JR East of it's own commuter services on the Chuo Line, wich were in direct competition with Keio Railway, a somewheat radical change from the relative slumber of the old JNR, resulting in the necessity for Keio to promote it's services as well so as to not be out-competed.

    As the key component of the modernization plan, the new trains, to be classified as the 8000 Series, were to be entirely designed from scratch, adopting the newest technologies available at the time, something more or less revolutionary from Keio, whose rolling stock came from a 20-year period of slow, constant evolution, starting from the 6000 Series of 1972 (and for some fetaures, this "evolutionary" design had roots in the even older 18m-type stock such as the 5000 Series of 1963 and even more old "green trains" of the 1950s!).

    The new trains fetarued a 20m stainless steel bodyshell, as was practice, with a large front mask made of Fiber-Reinforced Plastics, with a distinctively pleasant rounded look and large front windows with excellent visibility. Bucket-type seats were adpoted for the first time, as was a new "Train Navigation System" in the cab, the predecessor to the current self-diagnostic systems such as JR East's TIMS.
    For the first time, Keio Railway also adopted the new three-phase inverter control system, being one of the last major private railways in the Tokyo area to do so, with the choice being Hitachi's popular GTO-VVVF system.
    Finally, ditching the old dark red livery, the 8000 Series was painted in Keio's new red and blue colours, the same that had been applied a few years earlier on it's taxis and busses, giving the new trains a far more distinctive and modern look.

    Manufactured jointly by Nippon Sharyo and Tokyu Car Corporation, the first batch of 8000 Series trains began to be delivered in early 1992, consisting in fourteen 6-car sets and fourteen complementary 4-car sets, intended to be operated togheter as 10-car sets between Shinjuku and Takahatafudo, and then split there, with one set running to Keio-Hachioji (the terminus of the Keio Line) and the other running on the Keio Takao Line to Takaosanguchi.

    Upon their entrance in service on the 11th of May 1992, the new 8000 Series trains were extremely well recieved by both railwaymen, wich found them fairly easy and docile to drive, and by commuters alike, wich found them comfortable, spacious and bright, especially if compared to the older 7000 and 6000 Serieses.

    Deliveries of the first batch of fourteen 6+4-car sets was completed in December 1994, and in 1995 deliveries began on a second batch, this time formed as a seamless 8-car sets, intended for the newly-extended Sagamihara Line: the first set was delivered in January 1995, and the thirteenth and final was delivered almost exactly four years later in January 1999.
    By the turn of the millennium, Keio had a total of twenty-seven 8000 Series sets in it's fleet (more or less split equally between the Keio Line and the Sagamihara Line) for a total of 244 cars.

    From 2002, all of Keio's older trains on the 1372mm gauge network (the 6000 and 7000 Serieses - the old 5000 Series had been retired by mid-1995) began to be repainted in the same colours as the 8000 Series, and in 2005, the pantographs on all trains began to be replaced from the older scissor-type to a newer single-arm type, with the 8000 Series being no exception.

    From then, no major modification was carried out on the 8000 Series until the late 2000s: with the increase in passengers and a general restructuration of services on the Keio Line and the Takao Line, splitting and rejoining trains at Takahatafudo Station was no longer deemed necessary, with Keio opting to convert the existing fourteen 6+4-car sets into seamless 10-car sets.
    This conversion, wich involved cutting the front cab section and replacing with a "passenger section" (something made unusually handy and rather easy by the size of the front FRP mask, wich required little to no cutting of the original bodyshell), began on a set-per-set basis in 2013 and carried on all the way to 2019, when the last set was converted. This conversion was also matched at around the same time by a general refurbishment of the interiors, replacement of the original roller-blind front destination signs with LED-type ones and in more recent years, the replacement of the headlight lamps with LEDs.

    As of today, all twenty-seven 8000 Series sets are in service, with 10-car sets mostly in service on the Keio Line and Takao Line, and 8-car sets mostly in service on the Sagamihara Line.
    Having just been extensively refurbished, the 8000 Series recently passed it's 30th year of service mark almost good as new, and Keio has no plans for a replacement.

    In fact there hasn't been any retirement yet, nor scrapping, except for a cab car of a 6+4-car set, wich was involved in a landslide accident on the Takao Line in 2009, deemed beyond repair, scrapped and promply replaced by a newly-built intermediate car (since by then splitting and rejoining sets was becoming increasingly rare), resulting in an interesting and unique set with a cab car coupled "cab-side" with an intermediate car. This was however shortlived, as this was one of the very first sets to be converted into "seamless" 10-car set a few years later.

    Otherwise, in an interesting tale for a train that only had one car scrapped, a handful of cab sections are already being preserved! These are the surplus cab sections resulting from the conversions of the 2010s, with one, the cab end of car 8809 being preserved (and visitable) in it's as-retirement condition inside a new annex, opened in 2022, to Keio's "Keio Rail Land" museum.

  6. #7311
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Meridian, Idaho, USA
    Posts
    6,623
     

    Default

    Very nice! Thank you for all of your contributions!
    "When the power of love overcomes the love of power then the world will know peace." Jimi Hendrix

  7. #7312

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AlexMaria View Post
    Well, since today's my birthday, i decided to make myself a present - here's my favourite train from a major private railway - Keio's 8000 Series!
    Happy Birthday Socimi!

  8. #7313

    Default

    Happy Birthday to you Dusky!!

  9. #7314
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    1,635
    Blog Entries
    4
     

    Default

    @. AlexMaria happy birthday. And nice train.
    @ DuskyDusky nice screenshots

  10. #7315

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Railshuttle View Post
    Happy Birthday to you Dusky!!
    not my birthday lol

  11. #7316

    Default

    Aw! |My bad. been staying up way past my bedtime here. Gotta sleeeep.

  12. #7317
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    United States of America, TN, Memphis
    Posts
    167
     

    Default

    @alexmaria Happy late birthday!!!!!

  13. #7318
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Italy, Lombardia, Lodi
    Posts
    567
     

    Default

    And here it is, my final 1372mm gauge Keio train: the 9000 Series!



    Already available on my website!

    The 9000 Series was introduced by Keio Railway in the early 2000s as a replacement for the now 25-year old 6000 Series, especially on subway trough-services with the Toei Shinjuku Line.
    Unlike on the above-ground lines, for wich new rolling stock purchases had been made with a certain regularity (depsite Keio's habit to introduce a new series only evry 10 to 15 years), the specialized trough-services were still run exclusively with dedicated 6000 Series sets (the 6030 Series specifically), wich had entered service with the start of trough-services in 1980, but however was a slightly older design, with the original 6000 Series sets having entered service in 1972.

    This was due to a peculiar reason: the capricious analogue ATC system used by the Shinjuku Line at that time was somehow easily subjectable by electromagnetic interferences coming from inverter-type traction systems, hence VVVF-controlled trains were not permitted to run trough it.
    Toei had circumnavigated this issue for some time by continuing to purchase chopper-controlled trains, having in fact made the very last purchase of newly-built chopper-controlled trains (the 8th batch 10-000 Series sets) in 1997, a year when inverters had already become standard equipment on electric multiple units in Japan and worldwide as well. This of course wasn't a practical long-term solution - since choppers were now obsolete and out of production, it was only a matter of time before Toei was forced to purchase inverter-controller rolling stock, implying the adoption of a new ATC system. This was also aided by the very late 1990s the Shinjuku Line had neared the maximal number of trains allowed in service by the ATC system, and with congestion increasing, there was now also a need to increase the frequency of services.

    Finally, in the early 2000s, Toei took the decision to replace the old ATC system of the Shinjuku Line with a new "Digital" D-ATC system derived from the one JR East was about to implement on the Yamanote Line.

    With works underway to convert the Shinjuku Line to D-ATC, Keio Railway decided to order a new series of trough-service capable trains to replace the worn-out 6000 Series.
    Designated the "9000 Series", these were to be built jointly by Nippon Sharyo and Tokyu Car Co. using the former's newly-developed "Block Construction System", wich the manufacturer had developed as a way to have some "competitional leverage" against the more widespread Tokyu and Kawasaki "Shin-Keiretsu-Densha" design and Hitachi's A-Train system.

    Unlike the design work of the 9000 Series, the D-ATC conversion works on the Shinjuku Line were taking much longer than anticipated, due to their complex nature. However, Keio placed an order for the 9000 Series trains anyway, as the 6000 Series sets that needed to be replaced weren't assigned only to trough-services, but to many above-ground only services as well.
    Thus, a first batch of eight 8-car 9000 Series sets was delivered in late 2000, entering service on the 24th of January 2001 on non-trough-service local trains between Shinjuku and Keio Hachioji (on the Keio Line) or Hashimoto (on the Sagamihara Line), being used interchangeably with the older serieses.

    A peculiarity of these 9000 Series 8-car sets was that it was fitted with a multiple-unit control that enabled it to work togheter with 6000 and 7000 Series trains, usually in the form of a 2-car set being added to form a 10-car set for Rapid and Express services.

    The conversion to D-ATC of the Shinjuku Line was finally completed in 2005, with the switchover to the newer system on the 14th of May 2005. Later that year, Keio finally proceeded to order a new batch of 9000 Series trains "as they were meant to be", alas for subway trough-services.
    The first two of these such sets were delivered in late 2005 and entered service in January 2006, running trough-services between the Toei Shinjuku Line and the Keio Line and Sagamihara Line via the Keio New Line. These new "trough-service capable" 9000 Series were classified as their own "9030 Subseries" and besides the necessary adaptations to subway trough-services (the fitting of D-ATC, a few changes in interior materials and some other minor modifications), are almost identical to the other 9000 Series sets.
    Additional trough-service-capable 9000 Series steadily entered service in the following year, and with the delivery of the 18th set, in June 2009, there were enough 9000 Series trains available to take over the subway-trough services from the 6030 Series, wich was retired by the end of that month. 9000 Series deliveries continued briefly after the 6030 Series retirement, with two additional sets being delivered in July and August that year.

    Thus, by summer 2009, Keio Railway had a total of twenty-eight 9000 Series sets at it's disposal: eight above-ground-only 8-car sets and a staggering twenty trough-services-capable 10-car sets.
    Later that year, in November 2009, the last general overhaul of a 6000 Series car was performed - 6000 Series trains were all retired from Keio's 1372mm gauge main lines by the next spring, with the last runs in April 2010.

    After the retirement of the 6000 Series, the status of the 9000 Series has changed very little, with all twenty-eight sets still in service, with the only hiccup these trains had until now in their otherwise uneventful careers being the discovery of some cracks in the bogeys of motor cars due to metal fatigue, issues that were quickly repaired and dealt with.

  14. #7319
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    United States of America, TN, Memphis
    Posts
    167
     

    Default

    This is funny so I thought I would point this out, there's a small rail line in japan called the obama line.

  15. #7320

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chuckwagon2010 View Post
    This is funny so I thought I would point this out, there's a small rail line in japan called the obama line.
    Yes lol, apparently they celebrated when Obama was elected. Here are some pics i got when i visited.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •