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Thread: Japan

  1. #5491

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    Quote Originally Posted by HiBaller View Post
    Think of the track stubs as a runaway truck ramp in the mountains. If a truck loses its brakes, it can divert into a long stretch of loose gravel and come to a (hopefully) safe stop. This is the same principle. I wonder if the switch mechanism is train driver controlled, or if someone at a station has to throw the switch.

    Bill
    In Japan the basic setup for those switches would normally follows "coupled with departure signal" practice. If the signal shows "stop" aspect, the switch that leads toward track stub is set to "diverge" as its "correct" position, and it allows station staff to stop a runaway train before entering mainline track. In contrast, the switch would be set to "straight" if the signal is set to "clear", and indeed it is identified as "opposite" position on signal controller system.

    Regards,

    Arya.
    "Prepare for the worst, even if the result is actually better than the expected"

  2. #5492
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    Quote Originally Posted by jordon412 View Post
    HiBaller, look at my route 'Spring Switch Demo' on the DLS, <kuid:289739:102004>. It shows three ways kemal's as_left_pr, as_right_pr, as_left, and as_right can be used to turn a switch into a spring switch: a reverse loop, a passing siding, and a wye. These four things are triggers, and trigger the switch that to throw in the direction of a train or reset the switch after/when it passes over them.

    Ah, so. Cool! I'll check it out right now.

    Bill
    Name: Bill (USN, Retired) Into computers over 55 years
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  3. #5493
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    Quote Originally Posted by aryadwi_ef641030 View Post
    In Japan the basic setup for those switches would normally follows "coupled with departure signal" practice. If the signal shows "stop" aspect, the switch that leads toward track stub is set to "diverge" as its "correct" position, and it allows station staff to stop a runaway train before entering mainline track. In contrast, the switch would be set to "straight" if the signal is set to "clear", and indeed it is identified as "opposite" position on signal controller system.

    Regards,

    Arya.
    That makes perfect sense. So, in effect, it is automated and tied in with the signalling system. I'll take a look at those videos again and run some slow-motion views to see if I can spot the points on the stub track moving.

    Bill
    Name: Bill (USN, Retired) Into computers over 55 years
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    Currently using: T:ANE (SP4)

  4. #5494

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    (beware of large image)



    This is an example of derailer switch formerly used by Hakone Tozan Railway at Kazamatsuri station before 2006 (the year when standard gauge operation of Hakone Tozan Railway from Hakone-Yumoto to Odawara was discontinued, replaced by through-trains using Odakyu Electric Railway's 1067mm fleet). While the switch itself is technically a dual gauge derailer switch, it is coupled with departure signal as a measurement to prevent any runaway trains from entering mainline tracks if there is another train coming from opposite direction, hence the switch machine for this derailer switch is the electric ones (as it could be electrically connected to the main circuit of departure signal). However, the most dangerous disadvantage of this method is if the signal operator mistakenly operates the switch under the assumption that "there would be another train from opposite direction" (while actually no trains from opposite direction would come into the station at the time when the switch is operated) it would cause a fatal accident, especially if train driver does not realize about the mistake done by signal operator. This happens with Sangi Railway's 851 series #851F that suffers accident on November 8th, 2012 at Misato Station, when it slams into buffer stop after the signal operator made a mistake like mentioned above (and it causes the driver to not realize that the signal operator has done a fatal mistake).

    Regards,

    Arya.
    "Prepare for the worst, even if the result is actually better than the expected"

  5. #5495
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    Thanks, Arya. I can see in the picture that apparently the departure signal is red as the switch seems to be set to 'derail". There aren't any gaps in the frogs at the top of the picture though. This would not be a clean derail then as the left rail would be destroyed by the flanges from the right wheels as they pass though those frogs. So, when the signal turns green, this switch would be thrown and allow a smooth departure. At any other time, the train would derail.

    Interesting concept, but as you say, it can be dangerous if an operator isn't paying attention.

    Bill
    Name: Bill (USN, Retired) Into computers over 55 years
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    Trainzer since: 2003
    Currently using: T:ANE (SP4)

  6. #5496

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    Yeah, it's true. While not paying attention is a "must-not-happen" regardless of what concept used for preventing collision on mainline tracks, the concept for coupling departure signal and derailer switch itself is also prone to danger if operator fails to pay attention when operating signals and switches. Especially for the picture mentioned above: since it was a dual gauge derailer switch, it even requires more attention, as signal operators had to ensure that both standard gauge trains of Hakone Tozan Railway and 1067mm trains of Odakyu could safely pass the derailer switch without being accidentally directed into derailer track (though the ones at Kazamatsuri station were abolished and converted to a normal 1067mm derailer switch in 2006, as the 1435mm track was pushed back into Iriuda station and 1435mm trains of Hakone Tozan Railway starts at Hakone-Yumoto instead of Odawara).

    Cheers,

    Arya.
    "Prepare for the worst, even if the result is actually better than the expected"

  7. #5497
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    Yes, "trap points" are always connected to the starting signal. The point is actually set to the "derail" track all the time - they're only changed when a train is about to depart.

    Still, the trap points, ever since the introduction of ATC and ATS systems have fell out of use (take a look, for example, on railway line built from 1970s onwards - trap point are very scarce). They're practically a left-over from the days of non-continuous-brake trains, where trap points were mainly built and used to prevent an out-of-control, unbraked single wagon (rather than a full train) from entering the mainline.

    Today, trap points are still used in a similar way, but with maintainance vehicles and carts instead, wich aren't equipped with ATS or are too light to be detected by the block system.
    My trainz downloads are here and my youtube is here.

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    Very interesting. I didn't know about it. Also saw some of those 'dead ends' in Japanese Train video's now I know.

  9. #5499
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    In the game, however, to "fake" a trap point, you'd have to put an invisible "end of track" marker at the end of the rails UNLESS you faked the whole trap point using invisible track running right through the switch under what looks like the real thing.

    Bill
    Name: Bill (USN, Retired) Into computers over 55 years
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  10. #5500
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    Is there any plans about a Regauged version of Kenichiro's DD51? Since, his model is set at standard gauge not 1067mm (42in) gauge. The prototypical DD51 is 1067mm gauge.
    Last edited by webbk; September 11th, 2020 at 03:27 PM.

  11. #5501
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    Quote Originally Posted by webbk View Post
    Is there any plans about a Regauged version of Kenichiro's DD51? Since, his model is set at standard gauge not 1067mm (42in) gauge. The prototypical DD51 is 1067mm gauge.
    Currently no, altough the only thing needed would be a pair of new bogeys. Anyway, in my honest opinion, i don't think the gauge difference is that noticeable.

    ---

    Anyway, i've finally completed the KiHa 120 pack!



    Top row, from left to right: KiHa 120-0s in the Hiroshima, Shin-Yamaguchi and Kizuki depot liveries, KiHa 120-200s in the Fukui and Kizuki depot liveries and in the all-over vermillion red livery, KiHa 120-300s in the Kameyama, Okayama (some of those units are also in service with Toyama depot), Toyama (both former Shin-Yamaguchi and proper Toyama untits) and Hamada depot liveries. Bottom row, from left to right again: Matsuura Railway MR-100, MR-200 and MR-300 Serieses, Takachiho Railway TR-100 Series, Kumagawa Railway KT-100 Series, Asa Kaigan ASA-300 Series in the Asa East Line and Takachiho Railway livieries, Nishikigawa Railway NT-2000 Series and the Minami-Aso Railway MT-2000 and MT-2000A Serieses.
    (phew!)

    In total there are 43 individual railcars included in this pack: 33 KiHa 120s of JR West (11 liveries times 3 variants: "original state", "retrofitted toilet" and "refurbished units") plus 10 different diesel railcars of similar design in service for six different third-sector railways.

    You can download the "total" pack here (.rar format - uncompressed folder is 291MB) - individual packs will be avaible soon on my website. This time, all the necessary dependencies are included in the package, so there shouldn't be any problem.



    So, the KiHa 120 was built by Niigata Transys between 1992 and 1996, and was designed as a lightweight and cheap to maintain and run replacement for a conspicuous part of DMUs used by the newly-formed JR West on local services thruought much of it's unelectrified lines.

    Specifically, the new diesel railcars were to replace the ageing KiHa 20s, the severely deteriorated KiHa 35s and KiHa 45s and the KiHa 58s - some units, wich due to a shortage of DMUs, had been assigned to local services, but as KiHa 58s are geared for higher-speed rapid and express services, suffered from premature wear.

    Unlike all the other JR-Group companies, wich remained loyal to the JNR design dictates, JR West opted instead for a shorter, lighter, cheaper and predisposed-for-one-man-operation design. This had several advantage, in regard of saving money, one of JR West's main concerns: a shorter and lighter design meant less wear on the tracks and the train itself and less fuel consumption, wich meant less maintainance and running expenses (nonetheless, a shorter bodyshell is also cheaper to manufacture while not being too much of an impedment on a line with low ridership), and the implementation of one-man operation meant that, by eliminating conductors, crew expenses (wich aren't quite trascurable) could be effectively cut in half.

    With the rough concept set, JR West looked for a suitable manufacturer. The choiche was possible between two manufacturers only: Fuji Heavy Industries (renamed in 2016 as the "Subaru Corporation" - it is in fact the owner of the Subaru car brand) with it's LE-Car ("Light, Economy") design, wich went from two-axle railbusses to "proper" diesel railcars, and Niigata Transys, with it's NDC ("Niigata Diesel Car"), wich was a middle-way.

    Both companies had a vast experience in manufacturing DMUs, but not in designing them! - until then, they only had to follow JNR's blueprints! In fact, JNR had been the only railway company in Japan to order DMUs for almost 40 years, and with all the designing done by JNR technicians and engineers, the two manufacturers had little left to decide.

    JR West's new DMU was a chanche for both to introduce their own designs to the national tracks, with both the LE-Car and the NDC proving extremely popular with many of the newly-formed third-sector railways wich had inherited operational (or even uncomplete) lines from JNR.

    Niigata's NDC design emerged as the winner in 1991; this was partly due also to the Shigaraki crash, where a light (almost fragile) Fuji Heavy Industries LE-Car of Shigaraki Kogen Railway was obliterated by a head-on crash with an heavy and robust KiHa 58 of JR West.

    Designated KiHa 120s, the new DMUs were based on the Matsuura Railway MR-100 Series, wich had been built by Niigata Transys in 1988. JR West's new DMUs were to be divided into three subseries: the -0 subseries, with stainless steel bodies and all-longitudinal seating, the -200 subseries with conventional alluminum bodies and semi-cross seating and the -300 subseries with stainless steel bodies and semi-cross seating.

    With a reasonable maximium speed of 95Km/h, the KiHa 120s were equipped with the well-proven 6-cylinder, 11.040cc (330 CV) Komatsu SA6D125 engine and had an automatic gear changer (contrary to most third-sector railways, wich still often used manual gear changing).

    The first units to be delivered where the ones of the -200 subseries, wich entered service between March and July 1992. Divided between the depots of Fukui (for services on the Etsumi-Hoku Line) and Kizuki (for services on the namesake Kizuki line), they were painted in two distinctive liveries, one for each depot: white with green motifs and cream, yellow and dark green respectively.

    One year later, the first stainless-steel bodied -0 subseries units entered service, assigned to Kizuki depot (with a livery with the same of the -200 subseries units assigned to the same depot), Hiroshima depot (blue and purple livery) for services on the Geibi Line and the non-electrifed portion of the Fukuen Line and Shin-Yamaguchi depot (purple, blue and dark grey livery), for services on the San'in Main Line and the Mine Line.

    Finally, in March 1994 the first -300 subseries units were delivered; these were the bulk of the order, and were assigned to Kameyama depot (dark purple livery), for services on the Kansai Main Line, Hamada depot (blue and light-blue livery), for services on the San'in Main Line and the Sanko Line, Okayama depot (orange and red livery), for services on the Tsuyama Line, the Inbi Line, the Kishin Line, the Geibi Line, the Hakubi Line and yet again on the San'in Main Line, and finally, Toyama depot (acqua green, blue, yellow and red livery) for services on the Takayama Main Line, the Oito Line and the short Toyamako Line.

    Deliveries terminated in August 1996, with the final seven units being assigned again to Okayama depot. In just four years, Niigata Transys (with the help of JR West's Goto Works) manufcatured a total of 89 KiHa 120s.

    With the introduction of the KiHa 120s, JR West retired all of it's remaining KiHa 20s in 1993 and the KiHa 35s and 45s were retired or displaced and relegated to small, unimportant shuttle duties (such as the Omine branch line and the Wadamisaki Line) by a couple of years later. Finally, in the mid-1990s, JR West re-reassigned all the KiHa 58s used until then on local services, back to rapid services, for wich they were far better suited and designed.

    After their introduction, the KiHa 120s lived a tranquil, uneventful life for almost 30 years, with the few notable events being the closing of the Toyamako Line in 2006 (wich was converted into a modern tramway line later that year: today's Toyama Chiho Railway Toyamako "PortTram" Line) and in 2007, the retrofittment of toilets on all the 89 units of the fleet. Finally, in 2011, the livery of all the -200 subseries units was changed into an all-over vermillion red livery, reminescent (actually, identical) of the JNR-era "Metropolitan Red" livery for DMUs.
    Around this period, some Shin-Yamaguchi and Okayama depot units were transferred to Toyama depot to supplement "native" KiHa 120s on Oito Line duties. Of the two, the units coming from Shin-Yamaguchi recieved a new livery, similar to the Toyama depot units, while the ex-Okayama units kept (and still keep) their orange and red livery.

    Starting from 2017, 25 years after the introduction of the first units, JR West decided to refurbish it's fleet of KiHa 120s, wich had been proven as reliable and cheap to maintain and run DMUs, and by then, had become an unvaluable asset in JR West's fleet.
    The refurbishment program included the repairation of the bodyshells, new LED front lights, new seat upholstery, reinforcment of front windows and a chime for the doors. KiHa 120-208 (an all-over vermillion red liveried unit) was the first to be refurbished, re-entering service on the 16th of July 2017.

    At a cost of 25 million yen per car, all 89 KiHa 120 units will undergo the refurbishment program, wich is to be completed by 2021. In 2018, the Sanko Line closed, with the fleet of KiHa 120s serving the line being reassigned and transferred to the San'in Main Line.

    Lastly, in March 2020, KiHa 120-358 (the second-to-last KiHa 120 unit to be delivered), assigned to Okayama depot, hit a landslide on the Geibi Line and derailed. Nobody was injured, but the railcar suffered serious damages, and was subsequently scrapped - the only KiHa 120 unit to be scrapped (or to ever have been involved in an accident).


    Trivia:

    Taking into mind the Shigaraki crash, and the fact that they aren't equipped with ATS-P (but only with the very basic ATS-S), KiHa 120s are effectively banned (with very few exceptions) from running on "Mainline" tracks shared with more robust trains, and are strictly forbidden by JR West to run in the company's "urban network" (the ensemble of commuter, suburban and regional lines radiating from Osaka).


    Next: predecessors and derivatives for the third sector railways.
    Last edited by AlexMaria; September 14th, 2020 at 03:16 AM.
    My trainz downloads are here and my youtube is here.

  12. #5502
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    So, regarding the third-sector railway variants...

    As mentioned before, Niigata Transys's NDC design was originally developed for the numerous third-sector railway companies that had been taken over JNR lines since 1980, providing a more "railcar-like" design alternative to Fuji Heavy Industires' LE-Cars railbusses.

    Niigata's first NDC-type cars were the tiny, 14.8m long YR-1000 Series for Yuri Kogen Railway, wich were bought in 1985. One year later, in 1986, the first proper-lenght 16m-long NDCs entered service: the MT-2000 Series of Minami-Aso Railway, wich had inherited JNR's Takamori Line. A total of just three units were bought; these were equipped with a 6H13S motor manufactured by Niigata Transys itself, and had the transmission on the inner axles only, wich posed a quite significant problem, due to the Takamori Line's steep gradients; therefore, between 1998 and 2001, all three MT-2000s were refurbished and upgraded to an all-axle drive, their livery changed from white, yellow and blue to a white and red one and were reclassified as the MT-2000A Series.
    All three units are still in service as of today, forming the bulk of the Minami-Aso Railway's fleet.

    In 1987, five similar railcars to the Minami-Aso Railway MT-2000 Series were delivered to the Nishikigawa Railway, wich inherited JNR's Gannichi Line. Classified "NT-2000 Series", they were largely identical to their predecessors, and entered service on the 25th of July 1987.
    Originally, all five units were painted in the railway's standard livery of white with red and acqua green lines, but starting from 1999, each unit was repainted in a different livery, each designed by a town along the line.
    With the introduction of the NT-2000 Series in 2007, all five NT-2000s were replaced and taken out of service, with the last unit being retired in January 2009. All of the five NT-2000s were scrapped.

    Following the success of the two earlier models, in 1988, Niigata Transys started the production of the MR-100, MR-200 and MR-300 Series trains for the Matsuura Railway, wich was to inherit JNR's Nishi-Kyushu Line (wich at the time was being provisionally managed by the newly-formed JR Kyushu).
    All three serieses were built at the same time and used the same basic 16m bodyshell: the main differences were that the MR-100s were equipped with a gangway to connect with other units, while the MR-200 and MR-300s did not have one. MR-100s and MR-200s were for "regular services", and as such, had a largely identical livery, while the two MR-300s were cars for "special events", and as such, carried their own distinctive livery.
    A total of 18 cars was made, all in 1988: 11 MR-100s, 5 MR-200s and the two MR-300s, with all units entering in service on the 1st of April 1988, when the Nishi-Kyushu Line was finally handed over to the Matsuura Railway.
    With the introduction of the MR-600 Series in 2007, the "original" fleet of MR-100s, MR-200s and MR-300s progressively thinned, with the MR-200s and MR-300s being retired by the end of the year, followed by the MR-100 Series in 2012, with the last unit being retired on the 15th of April.
    All the retired units were acquired by the JICA, the Japanese Government's agency for international cooperation and assistance, and were subsequently donated to the railways of Myanmar in 2009, where all 18 units still run as of today.

    In 1989, the final iteration of the first-generation NDCs entered service: the KT-100 and KT-200 Serieses for the Kumagawa Railway and the TR-100 and TR-200 Serieses for the Takachiho Railway.
    These were largely identical to the earlier Matsuura Railway MR-100 Series, with the most notable difference being the addition of two top-mounted fog headlights.

    The KT-100 and KT-200s were delivered in late 1989, upon the transferral of the Yunomae Line from JR Kyushu to Kumagawa Railway on the 1st of October. The two serieses were largely identical: the four KT-100s had longitudinal seating and were intended for "day-to-day" regular services, while the 3 KT-200s were intended for tourist services and were equipped with semi-cross seating. Both serieses were painted in an identical white livery with red and blue lines.
    With the introduction of the KT-500 Series in 2014, all the older units were progressively retired, with the last KT-100 being retired in December 2014, with the exception of units KT-103 and KT-203, wich had been converted into the "Kuma" tourist train in 2009 and were retired two years later in 2016. All units were scrapped, except the "Kuma" ones, wich have been preserved at Asagiri Station.

    The Takachiho Railway TK-100s and TK-200s followed a similar system, with the -100 series being intended for regular services and the -200s being intended for tourist services. Both serieses entered service in April 1989, following the handover of the Takachiho Line from JR Kyushu.
    Unfortunately, like most other rural railway lines, suffered from a very low ridership, and the line was threatened with closure several times. The coup the grace for the line arrived in 2005, when Typhoon Nabi severely damaged the line, washing away several bridges. Due to the tremendous amount of work and money needed to re-open the line, wich wasn't justified by the line's fleeble ridership, the railway was officially closed that year.
    Of the five TK-100s and the two TK-200s, one (n░TK-201) was donated free-of-charge to the Asa Kaigan Railway in Shikoku, units TK-104 and TK-105 have been statically preserved at Hinokage Onsen station, and units TK-101 and TK-202 have been preserved (dinamically) at Takachiko Station.
    Either of the latter two units are avaible for a "driver experience" - you drive one of the two railcars for about 30 minutes (with the assistance of a former driver) at the cost of 10000 yen per person. The only requirement is a driving license (anything goes: car, motorbike, moped...)
    All the remaining units were scrapped.

    As mentioned, the last railway to get the first-generation Niigata Transys NDCs was the Asa Kaigan Railway. The very short 8.5Km-long line was left uncomplete by JNR in 1980 (wich planned to connect it to the Asa Line, itself handed over to another third-sector railway, the Tosa Kuroshio Railway). The line finally opened as a third-sector railway in 1992.
    The Asa Kaigan Railway is Japan's smallest independent railway, and upon it's opening, owned just two railcars: ASA-100 Series unit 101 and ASA-200 Series unit 201 (like the previous two railways, the -100 series was intended for regular services and the -200 series was intended for tourist services).
    In 2008, unit ASA-201 derailed at the line's terminus of Shikishui, and was subsequently scrapped. To replace it, the Asa Kaigan Railway loaned KiHa 40 2110 from JR Shikoku, but returned it later that year, when the railway acquired free-of-charge unit TK-201 from the closed Takachiho Railway.
    Reclassified as the ASA-300 Series unit 301, it originally ran in the white, light purple and red livery of the Takachiho Railway (complete with the railway's "TR" logo), but in 2010 it was repainted in a cream livery with the designs of two prefectural mascots: Sudachi-Kun of Tokushima Prefecture, and Ponkan-Kun of Kochi prefecture.
    The single ASA-300 Series unit is still in service for the Asa-Kaigan Railway, togheter with the company's only other DMU: the ASA-100 Series.

    After 1989, thanks to all these different serieses, Niigata's NDC had proven to be a fairly successful and reliable design, and was subsequently adopted by JR West for it's new KiHa 120s, being the last 16m-long DMUs manufactured by Niigata Transys, wich since then transitioned to the longer 18m-long bodyshell (both for third-sector railways and JR Group companies).
    My trainz downloads are here and my youtube is here.

  13. #5503
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    @Rizky_Adiputra

    Going through my content with missing dependencies and I have found I need <kuid:501228:22322091> which is needed for

    <kuid:501228:2210093> JRC[HD] - JRW 221-M
    <kuid:501228:2210094> JRC[HD] - JRW 221-Mp
    <kuid:501228:2210092> JRC[HD] - JRW 221-S
    <kuid:501228:2210091> JRC[HD] - JRW 221-Tc1
    <kuid:501228:2210095> JRC[HD] - JRW 221-Tc2

    Can you (or anyone here) please provide it or suggest a suitable substitution?

    Thanks =)

  14. #5504

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexMaria View Post
    I'll see what i can do... Altough usable reference images for the 2000GT seems to be quite few...



    say @alexmaria any progress on the reskin?

  15. #5505
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    Quote Originally Posted by rowletmaster View Post
    say @alexmaria any progress on the reskin?
    100%.

    Here it is:




    You can download it here.

    All the dependencies are the same ones as the other JR Shikoku 2000 Series reskins, with the exception of the hornsound. I have also included a ready-to-run 8-car consist.


    The 2000GT appears in the "Climax Stage" as Kei Koshigawa's vehicle, and it has the ability to cut across tight curves by jumping and landing again on the tracks (this is carried over from the original Initial D, where he cuts across hairpin bends by jumping from the upper to the lower lane).

    Trivia:

    In the original Initial D manga, Kei Koshigawa drives a blue 1992 Toyota MR2 (SW20-type). The JR Shikoku 2000 Series was manufactured by Fuji Heavy Industries, wich is actually the owner company of the Subaru car manufacturer.
    Last edited by AlexMaria; September 17th, 2020 at 01:48 AM.
    My trainz downloads are here and my youtube is here.

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