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Thread: UK Screenshots for Pre BR Blue. High resolution warning.

  1. #3436
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    Oh! I'm an absolute fan of the Elder Scrolls series! I played the hell out of Oblivion ( pun entirety intended) and have played through Skyrim more times than I can remember since it's release in 2011. Last I checked my Imperial Battlemage was looking for a massive soul gem to finally rid Cyrodill of the King of Worms.

    I'm currently waiting for the release of EDS VI Valenwood as it's supposed to come out this year. I can't wait to see what they come up with for the Province of the Bosmer!
    Tanker46

    Member of TCWW - Developer of the Brighton Project

  2. #3437
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tanker46 View Post
    Oh! I'm an absolute fan of the Elder Scrolls series! I played the hell out of Oblivion ( pun entirety intended) and have played through Skyrim more times than I can remember since it's release in 2011. Last I checked my Imperial Battlemage was looking for a massive soul gem to finally rid Cyrodill of the King of Worms.

    I'm currently waiting for the release of EDS VI Valenwood as it's supposed to come out this year. I can't wait to see what they come up with for the Province of the Bosmer!
    Strange as it might seem Tanker I own a copy of Skyrim, but have never played it. I have watched my daughter play through Skyrim more than a few times though. Developing narcolepsy put paid to me learning to play Skyrim. My long time custom made character in Oblivion has been specially tailored to suit my slowed down brain which is my biggest barrier to playing most modern games. Like you I have 'played the hell' out of Oblivion, but despite the streets of of some of the towns in Cyrodiil being more familiar to me than the town where I live I never get tired of playing Oblivion. I used to make texture mods for Oblivion before I took up with Trainz so my reskinning skills owe a lot to Elder Scrolls Oblivion.

    Edit: I'm sure my daughter will be interested in getting a copy of EDS VI Valenwood when it comes out.
    Last edited by KotangaGirl; January 12th, 2021 at 02:59 PM. Reason: more to say
    Narcolepsy is not napping.



  3. #3438
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    I understand. The great thing about Skyrim is that the user interface is a LOT easier to use than Oblivions is. They simplified the leveling and crafting systems and made it much easier to save progress than before. The game engine was fine tuned to make it easier for players to understand and work with. Having played both games I highly recommend you check it out if you ever find the time. You'll be surprised how good the game is!

    I wish I had time to play like I did before but between work and family life it seems that Trainz is the only hobby I can dedicate myself towards. I don't mind though as there's plenty to work on to keep myself busy!


    A new project I am working on. This is the first of its kind from me. After seeing the awesome screenshots Borderreiver does of the NER, I decided to make a TMR Route featuring the area of North Blythe. I haven't gotten very far with it yet but thanks to Euromodeller's fantastic barebones TMR routes I at least have a place to start!


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    Tanker46

    Member of TCWW - Developer of the Brighton Project

  4. #3439
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    Default Shildon Yard 1950

    Shildon Yard was a large coal handling facility in NE England astride the original 1825 Stockton & Darlington line.




    A train of empty steel coal hoppers arrives at the eastern end of the yard, with the down loops and spurs on the south side of the line.

    Loaded coal wagons arrived from the west, with collieries in the area operating through to the late 1950s/early 1960s. By 1950 there were somewhat fewer collieries operating than there were at the peak of traffic in 1913.
    Once marshalled in to long trainloads most would depart from the eastern end of the yard and travel via the formerly DC Overhead electrified Simpasture branch via Redmarshall to Newport yard by the River Tees.
    Last edited by borderreiver; January 15th, 2021 at 07:13 PM.

  5. #3440
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    Amazing shot and history, borderreiver, sad to think that all that industry is now long gone.

    LBSCR WIP TANE,

    (SECR visitors)



    Cheers, evilcrow

  6. #3441
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    Default 1946 - Shunting Coal at Blackhill

    Hello Tanker and Evilcrow, thanks for your kind words and great screenshots.
    Circa 1946, a J72 0-6-0T is shunting coal hoppers at Blackhill.




    The hoppers are heavily weathered. Examples are 20 Ton diagram 100 steel hoppers, a 15 Ton diagram P6 wooden hopper and a 20 Ton diagram P7 wooden hopper. The diagram 100s have detailed differences since one was built by Metro-Cammell while the other was built by Hurst-Nielson.

  7. #3442
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    Default 1949 - Q5 0-8-0 Hauling Coal at Shildon

    Former LNER Q5 Class 0-8-0 No. E3260 of Middlesborough shed is hauling a loaded coal train out of Shildon Yard in County Durham one morning during 1949. She will reach Newport Yard on the River Tees via the formerly DC overhead electrified Simpasture branch.




    E3260 was a Worsdell veteran, built as T1 Class 0-8-0 No. 130 in March 1902. The T1 designation meant that she was turned out with slide valves rather than piston valves. The class has been under threat since December 1946. when the first was withdrawn. Austerity 2-8-0s were arriving in large numbers, rendering the Q5s redundant. E3260 would be condemned in October 1950.


  8. #3443
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    #3441. I was particularly taken by the screenshot of the coal drops at Blackhill Frank, though your other screenshots are looking good too.

    #3440. Yay! SECR. Another excellent screenshot Ken. My liking for the SECR no doubt arises from my liking for the K&ESR.

    #3438. Definitely something different from you with an NER line in early BR days Tanker.
    Narcolepsy is not napping.



  9. #3444
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    Thanks Annie. As ever, Evilcrow turns out exceptional screenshots and Tanker46 will have a busy time setting up his North Blythe route.



  10. #3445
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    Love your Blackhill shots, Frank. I remember measuring it all up for a P4 model many years ago, but it proved impractical due to the many levels. I also recollect the very large goods shed with the crane inside. Great stuff.
    Best wishes
    Ian

  11. #3446
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    Default Blackhill Station, County Durham

    Hello Ian, Thanks! Blackhill station was built as part of the N.E.R.'s extension of the Lanchester Valley branch by the construction of the Derwent Valley branch in 1867. The railway politics of the late 1850s was the genesis for the branch, though the N.E.R. was lukewarm in its enthusiasm.

    The L.N.W.R. planned to reach Newcastle from the south-west from Tebay via Kirkby Stephen, Barnard Castle, Bishop Auckland, Crook, Tow Law, Blackhill, Rowlands Gill and Scotswood. The scheme involved both the Lancashire & South Durham Union Railway (using the Stockton & Darlington Railway running powers) and the Newcastle & Carlisle Railway, since their tracks would be required. In the case of the L&SDUR/S&DR from Tebay to Hownes Gill near Consett and in the case of the N&CR their tracks from the south bank of the Tyne in to the N&CR section at the west end of Newcastle Central. However, a new line would be required between the S&DR at Hownes Gill and the N&CR at Derwenthaugh. The L.N.W.R. also wanted to siphon off traffic from Consett Iron Company as well as any colliery and quarry it passed by. This was going on at the same time as the North British Railway was using the Border Counties Railway and N&CR to reach Newcastle from Riccarton junction on the Waverley route. Just how the N.E.R. overcame all of this, while in the process gaining the rights to haul East Coast passenger trains to Edinburgh, access to Carlisle Citadel joint station, control of the S&DR and taking over the N&CR is worthy of a book in its own right!!

    Just how practical the L.N.W.R. scheme would have been will never be answered. In the late 1850s while Hownes Gill viaduct had been opened Crook to Tow Law was still operated by an incline. Gradients would have been heavy and the population density sparse. The scheme required a response from the N.E.R. though since it was intent on keeping other companies out of its territory.

    Both the Lanchester valley and Derwent valley branches were the price for thwarting the L.N.W.R. plans and the N.E.R. at least progressed them. The Lanchester valley was delayed due to a banking crisis in 1857 but by 1860 that had been resolved, with the line opening in 1862. The Blaydon & Conside branch (the Derwent Valley line) opened in 1867.

    At the time of opening, Blackhill station was named Benfieldside after the parish in which it was built. The original terminus of the Lanchester Valley branch, the 1862 Consett station was sited just north of what became, in 1893, Consett North junction between the Lanchester Valley branch and the former Stanhope & Tyne line (by then the Pontop and South Shields branch), The 1893 double track East to North chord between Consett East and Consett North junctions crossed above both the 1868 Hownes Gill to Consett South junction chord and the 1862 Lanchester Valley branch as it climbed at 1 in 49. What public goods facilites were available at the 1862 Consett station are unknown to me, but with even Knitsley station having a run round loop, a coal drop spur and two sidings I can't imagine the 1862 Consett station having less provision than that. The facilites probably disappeared beneath the post-1867 expansion of the yard in the area as Consett iron Company's traffic requirements grew.




    In any event, Benfieldside appears to have been built with a view to service both the Blackhill and Consett areas and a small turntable was provided to turn the tender engines which were running only as far as the station before returning to either Durham or Newcastle. From 1868 this would also include Darlington with the Hownes Gill to Consett South chord. As you said, the site was challenging. Built on the side of the valley, which is rather steep at this point, with a falling gradient for the railway, pretty much for all the way from Consett North to Derwenthaugh I can see the problems when trying to reproduce it in P4 scale.

    The Consett station most people know did not exist prior to 1896.


    Last edited by borderreiver; January 16th, 2021 at 08:51 AM.

  12. #3447
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    Ed's lovely GWR De Glehn compound 'La France' at Truro even though the 'Atlantics' never worked in Cornwall, - but on this occasion I don't care. (TANE version Cornish Mainline, Tinware SP1 TS2019)



    Paulz Trainz De Glehn compound from TS2006 days sneaks into the picture. The shade of green Paul used on this model is very close to GWR pre-1900's era green. There is of course no comparison with Ed's beautifully made and well researched TRS19 De Glehn model with several errors on the older TS2006 model being all too plain to see, BUT having put many miles under the wheels of this old veteran I will be giving it an honorable retirement.



    Last edited by KotangaGirl; January 18th, 2021 at 04:32 AM.
    Narcolepsy is not napping.



  13. #3448
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    Default Highland Railway Train on the C¨il an Droighinn Viaduct

    It is some time since I have been working on my Ullapool route. A misty morning in the far north west of Scotland as a Skye Bogie 0-4-4 ascends the grade between Inverbroom and Gleann M˛r at C¨il an Droighinn viaduct on the Ullapool line. The 1 in 36 is a relentless climb to get the line above the Corrieshalloch gorge and the falls within it, so there is a banking tank 0-6-4T on the rear.







    The line was never built, since the Highland decided to extend its line from Strome Ferry to Kyle of Lochalsh instead. The government preferred, if the Ullapool line was to go forward, that it did not terminate at Ullapool, but at Ardmair, close by Isle Martin, around seven miles further north. In my alternate universe I have the Admiralty taking an interest in the project in the late 1890s, with the objective of using the bay at Ardmair for Royal Navy vessels. After much lobbying and a threat to have the Great North of Scotland granted permission to build the line, with running powers between Inverness and Garve, the Highland finally came on board, with most of the money coming from the government.

    Construction was difficult and completion came as late as 1905. Like the Kyle line, the traffic was light. It settled down to two daily passenger trains from Ardmair to Inverness each day except Sunday, with two in the opposite direction. A third train ran between Dingwall and Ullapool. The Ardmair trains met the ferries to Stornoway. There was a daily freight train, with timber, stone, cattle and fish featuring as the main traffic outwards and coal as the main traffic inwards. During the summer months the Falls of Measach in the Gorrieshalloch Gorge were a tourist attraction, with a charabanc meeting the train from Dingwall to Ullapool at Abhainn Droma Lodge in order to take tourists to the viewing point for the falls.

    During WWI and WWII naval traffic on the line was considerable, bound for the Naval quay at Ardmair.



    Last edited by borderreiver; January 17th, 2021 at 07:01 PM.

  14. #3449
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    Fantastic screenshots from BorderReiver. Really atmospheric.


  15. #3450
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    #3448 I agree, - excellent screenshots Frank.
    Narcolepsy is not napping.



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