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Thread: In today's Trainz Newsletter (Tips for Content Manager) it says ...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Default In today's Trainz Newsletter (Tips for Content Manager) it says ...

    That Download This Version will not download any dependencies. That is not what I experience using TANE SP4 or lower.

    Instead, one has to watch the download and stop it once the first item has been installed. Any dependencies that apply to that version are still downloaded but the versions downloaded are those spelled out in the config file of the first asset, not the latest ones available. If the download is allowed to proceed then obsolete assets might be downloaded.

    I always stop the download of routes and sessions as above and then list the dependencies so that the latest ones are downloaded. This is a selective process as I usually don't want to download heaps of buildings, scenery, people, vehicles etc when I am simply evaluating the usefulness of a route or session.

    So is the newsletter incorrect or am I living in a parallel universe?

    Trevor

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
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    Australia, Victoria, Churchill
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    Default

    No, you're not seeing things and the behaviour is the same for TRS19. It is Trainz after all, what is expected to happen and what we get are sometimes different.
    cheers
    Graeme

  3. #3
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    Default

    I download the full package and then, using the download date, determine what I want. Just maybe, there might be some gems in the full package.
    You also can delete ALL of the items downloaded using the date/time.
    Dick near Pittsburgh, Pa. i5-2500K 4.2ghz, 8gb memory, GTX1060 3gb video card. 111951

  4. #4
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    Hmmm, what is in the newsletter is what Tony said in the ftp thread about a week ago. He must have gotten bad info from the programmers. Thanks for letting me know there is a new newsletter. I can go fetch it from the spam-filter. Really wish N3V didn't use a mass mailer known for spamming the world to distribute the newsletter.

    William

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wreeder View Post
    Hmmm, what is in the newsletter is what Tony said in the ftp thread about a week ago. He must have gotten bad info from the programmers. Thanks for letting me know there is a new newsletter. I can go fetch it from the spam-filter. Really wish N3V didn't use a mass mailer known for spamming the world to distribute the newsletter.

    William
    Can't you just put the newsletter email address in your known sender list or contact list?
    Greg
    TRS19 StndEdition SP3, Plus SP2, Plus SP3, Plus Beta-113642
    WIN10 GTX 1060-6 Windforce
    - also OSX installs: iMac, MBP


  6. #6
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 1611mac View Post
    Can't you just put the newsletter email address in your known sender list or contact list?
    Well, I've done that but you see I have the new enhanced version of spam assassin. It tells me "I know you want it but I know it is from Mailchimp and they are notorious for hosting spammers" So it passes it but plunks it in the spam folder as if it is laughing at me. Other than that it seems to work a champ.

    William

  7. #7
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    Very odd. I maintain a 6500 name list on Mailchimp and it's delivery success is much higher than others we have used. Over the past 5 years I've tried 3 different services. Mailchimp is by far the best of those I've tried as far as delivery success. I'm curious how you know that they are notorious for hosting spammers? If that is true much more mail we send out would never make it. We have almost no mail returned due being on an official "spammers list." All our problems are from people who don't understand how to white list email. The email makes it to their host's mail server but their mail app throws it into spam, which in turn, moves it to spam on the server as it responds to what happens on the local app.
    Greg
    TRS19 StndEdition SP3, Plus SP2, Plus SP3, Plus Beta-113642
    WIN10 GTX 1060-6 Windforce
    - also OSX installs: iMac, MBP


  8. #8
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    I worked for an ISP for 18 years before I retired. We had a spam filter run by former employees called Antespam. They used to tell me the details of how they determined what was spam. They had numerous lists they subscribed to that listed mail servers by reputation according to blacklists that exist on the Internet. Added to that was whether their customers blacklisted or whitelisted senders within the filter interface. They also took into consideration how many rejects they saw from a sender and the rate of mail they received in 5 minute intervals. Flooding their servers got you throttled and repeated flooding got you blacklisted. Now I retired 2 1/2 years ago so things might have changed. They used to tell me that some of Mailchimp's servers were very bad with floods of high reject messages. Mailchimp has many servers all over the world and not all of them had bad reputations but some did. The biggest problem seemed to be with drive by spammers that registered dozens of domains then wait a while before signing up for mailchimp accounts for each domain. They then send out a flood of messages before Mailchimp would shut down the accounts. Maybe Mailchimp installed outbound limiters to slow the rate that messages were sent if they saw too many in a short time. We were just installing those on our hosting servers when I retired. Of course, most of the bad guys were moving to virtual servers too at that time. Sounds like you run a good opt in list so I'm not surprised that you don't have problems. All my domains are on a virtual server run by myself and my ex-boss. He is scary smart but really paranoid about security. He may have spam assassin cranked up to the max.

    William

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