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Thread: Thanksgiving like Holiday in your Country?

  1. #1
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    Default Thanksgiving like Holiday in your Country?

    Do you have a Thanksgiving like holiday in your country? I know that America uses the name but I would think that some sort of harvest time holiday might exist elsewhere around the world. Just a celebration of the bounty of a good harvest maybe? I ask because it occurs to me that the colonists were British citizens when the holiday was started and wondered if its roots were from an older event in Britain.

    William

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    that would be interesting, i know that black friday is everywhere, and i do know some places do celebrate some form of it, just dont know the names

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    No holiday in UK, there is a Religous Harvest Festival that occurs on the Sunday closest to the Harvest Moon that is closest to the Autumn Equinox, was originally a pagan thing, probably involving Druids and suchlike, not much interest these days other than for devout Church goers.

    Black Friday and Cyber Monday are imports from the US and only recently appeared in the UK.
    Malc


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    Thanksgiving in Canada is the second Monday in October. It gets cold up here.

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    Quote Originally Posted by clam1952 View Post
    No holiday in UK, there is a Religous Harvest Festival that occurs on the Sunday closest to the Harvest Moon that is closest to the Autumn Equinox, was originally a pagan thing, probably involving Druids and suchlike, not much interest these days other than for devout Church goers.

    Black Friday and Cyber Monday are imports from the US and only recently appeared in the UK.
    That's sounds like it might be a source for the colonist's idea at least. Thanks. Although going to church has never been a part of Thanksgiving in my life. Saying grace at the table was the most religious it ever got. Thanksgiving Day was watching parades in the morning, families gathering to eat a huge meal and American football in the afternoon.

    William

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    Quote Originally Posted by CaseyBerg View Post
    Thanksgiving in Canada is the second Monday in October. It gets cold up here.
    I don't think I ever knew that Canada had Thanksgiving too. Of course all I know about life in Canada I learned from watching Corner Gas on Amazon Prime.

    Thanks.

    William

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    Thanksgiving really is just harvest day, because it marks the anniversary of the first big harvest in murica

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    Thank you dear God for all your blessings. I pray that all fellow Trainzer's and their families everywhere in the world have a safe and wonderful time together on this great occasion.
    HAPPY THANKSGIVING
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    Here's a good website that describes the history of Harvest Sunday in the Uk. https://www.christchurchmorningside....st-sunday-2020

    Here in New Zealand I can remember Harvest Sunday being celebrated when I was much younger than I am now, but with increased urbanisation and people no longer having any connection to the rural countryside it's largely died out.
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    When I was at Junior School (ages 7 -11) in 1938-42, we celebrated Empire Day, which later on became Commonwealth Day but has since been quietly forgotten! A special School Assembly was held, members of organisations like Boy Scouts and Girl Guides wore their uniforms, we saluted the Union Flag and sang the National Anthem. Very jingoistic!

    Nowadays, the three UK devolved countries celebrate the days of their patron saints - Pattirck, David and Andrew - but very few now pay any attention to St George.

    30th November is St Andrew's Day, Scotland. I have my haggis and whisky at the ready!

    (Any questions about Haggis?)

    Ray
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    Do they still have haggis hunts? ;o)
    Malc


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    In Germany no Thanksgiving like in the US. But the first Sunday in October is "Harvest-Thanks-fest", in catholic and Lutheran churches. People (children) bring fruits etc to church, altars are decorated with harvest products.
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    Wow, very interesting. Thanks to everyone for taking time to answer.

    Haggis is kinda of like boiled chitterlings is it not?

    https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/71...-chitterlings/

    William

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    As far as I know, Malc, the answer is No as the wild Haggis appears to be extinct and only copies are available, industrially made and with plastic skins. It is, however, possible to have a hunt for them in our local supermarket which has just been rebuilt and where diligent searching appears to be needed to find where anything is now to be found.

    Ray
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    Member of Trainz Carriage and Wagon Works

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    Haggis is kinda of like boiled chitterlings is it not?
    it's a bit more than that, William. Traditionally it consists of the large stomach bag of a sheep; the pluck including the heart, liver and lights; suet; coarse oatmeal; onions; cayenne, salt and black pepper. The bag is used to contain the other ingreients. It is served with mashed potatoes and turnips (known as tatties and neeps).

    I will not bore you with the method of preparation!

    Ray
    Dukes Denver Designs (Ray Whiley - Textures and 3d Virtual Models for TRAINZ).
    Member of Trainz Carriage and Wagon Works

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