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Thread: What Diesel Loco's Engine do you think will outlast Other Loco Engines?

  1. #1
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    Default What Diesel Loco's Engine do you think will outlast Other Loco Engines?

    Throughout the years, diesel locomotive manufacturers have made various diesel engines of the 4-stroke and 2-stroke type. However, some seem to be more durable than others. That leads to the question: Which ones of these diesel engines will remain standing while all the other diesel engines around it fall? I've narrowed it down to two engine models: EMD's 567 and ALCo's 251. Here's the reasons why:
    1. Locomotives with EMD's 567 are found all across North America on tourist railways, shortlines, industrial railroads, etc.
    2. Locomotives with ALCo's 251 makes up the bulk of Indian Railway's roster, most of which have been rebuilt with 251 engines.
    3. The ALCo 251 is used to power NASA's Crawler-Transporter, which transported both the Space Shuttle and the Saturn V, the tallest, heaviest, and most powerful rocket ever brought to operational status, from the Vertical Assembly Building (VAB) to either Launch Pads 39A or 39B, on a specially-designed 'Crawlerway'. Without the 251 engines, the Crawler wouldn't be able to move, and without the crawler being able to move, well, we wouldn't have put a man on the Moon.
    4. The 567 has been offered for marine and stationary versions, with a left-hand or right-hand rotating engine.
    5. The 251 is still offered as a stationary power generator.
    6. The 567 was used in the Landing Ship, Tank (LST) (2), which was used by the US Navy, the Royal Navy, and the Royal Canadian Navy, of which 1,000 was made of and was used in WWII and the Korean War.
    As you can see, each one has their pros, which one do you think is the better one? Or do you think you have an engine that would be a worthy opponent for these two engines?
    Owner of Freeman Locomotive Works.

  2. #2
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    Any engine you can get parts for will last as long as you can get them.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by whitepass View Post
    Any engine you can get parts for will last as long as you can get them.
    Yep, lot of EMD's 645s and 710s floating in boats, too.

    Make train simulators great again #MTSGA obiter dictum

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    Quote Originally Posted by whitepass View Post
    Any engine you can get parts for will last as long as you can get them.
    Yup. When I traveled across the Midwest during my storm-chasing trips, I saw a lot of old SW1200s, Baldwin, and early Alco units waiting for service at various grain elevators and other food mills. Some were in almost pristine condition and appeared their owners took pride in their equipment while others looked a bit haggard and worn down. It was great seeing old road names too such as Milwaukee Road and Rock Island still emblazoned on the sides of some of these locos.
    John
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  5. #5
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    all those that are maintained correctly for the conditions they are working under.
    World peace is a bit far off, lets work at Trainz peace for now

  6. #6

    Thumbs up

    Well, as a back yard Mechanic, who tore down auto and some landscape equipment, the one thing old timers told me, if you love a piece of equipment, and maybe your income, or life depends on same, take care of maintenance, don't defer, and don't abuse it will serve you well. And for gosh sake, if nothing else, change those Fluids, otherwise just like your health, it will suffer an attack. Could be fatal.......

    I always took care of equipment, I didn't have the time, nor the money to replace or fool around with it.....

    I have known a lot of mechanics in different trades, story is the same.......

    Of course how well the item is built, is just as important, hence that nasty word called "lemon" and I only had one of those in my life. Made sure never to repeat that mistake again, cost me in the neighborhood of over 15k of lost money on multiple repairs......I soon became a quick learner of quality, not Cheap design shenanigans......

    Thanks for excellent story recap for EMD and Alco's explains a lot of what I see working on Short lines here and there.....

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by blueodessey View Post
    Of course how well the item is built, is just as important, hence that nasty word called "lemon" and I only had one of those in my life. Made sure never to repeat that mistake again, cost me in the neighborhood of over 15k of lost money on multiple repairs......I soon became a quick learner of quality, not Cheap design shenanigans......
    Was it a Ford Pinto?
    Owner of Freeman Locomotive Works.

  8. #8

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    I vote for EMD locomotives as their relatively light weight (rpm) has significant benefits for shortline and industrial operators.

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