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Thread: All about railways in Indonesia (beware of HD pics)

  1. #16
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    Recently I came across this Gedenkboek.
    Image0305.jpg
    Considering its age, it is very well preserved. Even the books from those days were made with quality.


    70337:
    TRS19 Platinum, build 110491 SP2, Win10 Pro 64 bit, i7-7700 3.6GHz 16 GB, GTX 1070 Ti

  2. #17

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    From the title it is clear that the gedenkboek was created for commemorating the 50th anniversary of Staatsspoorwegen (SS), which also coincides with the opening of the first electrified railway in the-then Batavia spanning from Tandjoeng Priok to Meester Cornelis (Jatinegara) via Pasar Senen, as well as from Tandjoeng Priok to what is now known as Jakarta Kota. The book also includes one photograph of the famous Cikuda bridge (known among local people as "Jembatan Cincin" or "ring bridge" because of its arch structure) on the Rancaekek - Tanjungsari railway line, but unfortunately the line was forcibly closed in 1942 by Imperial Japanese Army as it was deemed to be "ineconomical for wartime period" (all of the tracks were dismantled, but luckily the bridge still remains until today. In fact, the line is one of the four disused railway lines planned by the Government of West Java province and the Indonesian Railways to be relaid and reopened for rail traffic, along with the already in progress Cikajang Line (Cibatu - Garut - Cikajang), Pangandaran Line (Banjar - Pangandaran - Cijulang) and Ciwidey Line (Bandung - Ciwidey through Cikudapateuh, Dayeuhkolot and Soreang).

    One of the interesting fact from that gedenkboek is the inclusion of a 1925 Sumatra railway map, where the still-separated line of Deli Spoorweg Maatschappij (DSM) and Atjeh Tram (AT) that composes the current 1st Regional Division of North Sumatra and Aceh, Staatsspoorwegen ter Sumatra's Westkust (SSS) that later became the current 2nd Regional Division of West Sumatra, and Staatsspoorwegen op Zuid-Sumatra (ZSS) which forms the current 3rd and 4th Regional Division of South Sumatra and Lampung were to be connected by new railway connections that eventually would transform into the Trans-Sumatra Railway. The plan, however, never materialized due to The Malaise and the World War II...
    "Prepare for the worst, even if the result is actually better than the expected"

  3. #18
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    Hmmm, so you also have a copy or is it also available in the local library? Any idea how many of those books were printed?


    70337:
    TRS19 Platinum, build 110491 SP2, Win10 Pro 64 bit, i7-7700 3.6GHz 16 GB, GTX 1070 Ti

  4. #19

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    I'm having a digitalized version of the book in PDF format, although it was only for some pages and it was made as a public download (after translated into English) by Mr. Dirk Teeuwen on his site:

    http://www.indonesia-dutchcolonialhe...925GedBoek.pdf
    "Prepare for the worst, even if the result is actually better than the expected"

  5. #20

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    I've decided to share some Google Maps links to locations where the old Krian-type roundel signals formerly used by the now-defunct Panarukan Line still stands in its original places. While those at Sukowono station are presumed to be still intact, however, since there are no Streetview photos for the area around the signal I couldn't confirm the condition of the signals):

    1. Tamanan station

    https://www.google.com/maps/@-8.0112...7i13312!8i6656

    This one is for Kalisat-bound trains, whereas the Panarukan-bound one has been moved to Ambarawa museum in 2014. The current state of the signal (as of November 2019) is shown in the 4th photo of this Instagram post, where the signal's red roundel was found by the owner of that Instagram post in the condition rotated 90 degrees from its original position, but with the vertical semaphore does not rotate at all (the semaphore rotates 45 degrees to the right if signalman gives "clear" aspect, otherwise it shows "caution" aspect if the roundel's red-colored face is not shown toward the driver but with the semaphore stays in vertical condition).

    2. Bonosare station

    a. Panarukan-bound

    https://www.google.com/maps/@-7.8894...7i16384!8i8192

    Currently this is the only Krian-type roundel signal of Panarukan Line that still retains its cross mark dated back from 2004, as the mark was placed by Indonesian Railways for marking the signal as "defunct". The photograph shows that the roundel is in the same condition with the ones at Tamanan station when the photo was taken by Google's Streetview camera.

    b. Kalisat-bound

    https://www.google.com/maps/@-7.8867...7i16384!8i8192

    This one was photographed in the normal "stop" condition, just like when there are no trains coming to the station. Ironically the first photograph of the same signal taken in 2015 also shows the same condition with the ones at Tamanan station in 2019.

    3. Prajekan station

    a. Panarukan-bound

    https://www.google.com/maps/@-7.8125...7i16384!8i8192

    While this signal is placed just before a grade crossing, but the signal was hidden under the leaves and branches of a giant jackfruit tree that planted after the closure of Panarukan Line in 2004. Ironically the signal's vertical semaphore is in slightly rotated condition, in contrast to the main roundel that still stays in its "stop" position.

    b. Kalisat-bound

    https://www.google.com/maps/@-7.8007...7i13312!8i6656

    Because the signal was placed a few hundred meters after the crossing (which stands near the former bridge of Prajekan sugarcane railway), I had to zoom the view to give a closer look of the signal.

    4. Panarukan station

    https://www.google.com/maps/@-7.6966...7i16384!8i8192

    Since the signal stands very close to the National Route #1, of course the Streetview camera could easily take the photograph. Compared to the other example, this one only has the red-colored roundel without vertical semaphore, as this station is the terminus of Panarukan Line.

    Regards,

    Arya.
    "Prepare for the worst, even if the result is actually better than the expected"

  6. #21

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    Recently I just came across an interesting photo on Twitter, where the photo itself was scanned from product catalog of Nippon Sharyo Seizou Kabushiki-gaisha (Nissha) that contains the photographs of KL3-76 and KL3-78 series non-AC EMUs in its original form. The two types were ordered by Indonesian Railways when it was still under the Indonesian name of Perusahaan Jawatan Kereta Api (PJKA) in 1976 and 1978 (the photographs are on the lower side of the scanned page):



    (photograph was taken from this tweet: https://twitter.com/YamanoteE231/sta...77964656250881 )

    Unfortunately none of the examples of KL3-76 and KL3-78 series non-AC EMUs (along with the later KL3-83, KL3-84, KL3-86 and KL3-87) are preserved, and even all of them were flagged as "to be scrapped". Ironically the last one transported to Cikaum station were having "slated for preservation" stickers on its body, although until today it is still not clear whether it would be scrapped there at Cikaum or taken back into the rails for preservation.

    Technically those non-AC EMUs were already in heavily worn-out condition when they were removed from regular duty in 2013 due to the "all of commuter trains must have air conditioners installed, and the doors and windows must be closed when the train is running!" decree that issued by Ignasius Jonan as the-then CEO of Indonesian Railways, since they were carrying passengers that exceeds the maximum capacity of trains (yeah, it includes what we known as "rooftop ride" or "door-hanging ride", with most of them are done by passengers who does not purchase tickets). Because of this, they were deemed to be "too dangerous", even if the bodies are heavily refurbished by Manggarai workshops or Depok EMU depot, or even PT INKA in Madiun.

    Regards,

    Arya.
    "Prepare for the worst, even if the result is actually better than the expected"

  7. #22

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    Just found a classic photo of Jakarta Kota station in the days when electric locomotives of former Elektrische Staatsspoorwegen (ESS) were still deployed for hauling passenger trains over the electrified lines around Jakarta, as well as the Jakarta to Bogor line that electrified in 1930s:



    (original photo by Mr. John Joyce, uploaded to Facebook by Faishal Ammar)

    The photo shows former ESS3200 series #3206, renumbered by Indonesian Railways to #206, seen here hauling a 3-car local passenger train. The second car is a combined passenger coach, which had baggage room on the front half and 3rd class seats for the rear half of the whole coach. Note that at that time Jakarta Kota still had switches near the buffer stop to enable run-around movement for locomotives, and unfortunately the switches were already removed as late as 1980s, primarily because of the introduction of EMU for local services on electrified lines in 1976. On the other hand, long-distance passenger trains were does not heavily affected by the abolition of run-around switches, as they would simply perform reversing movement for returning to Jakarta Kota Coach Depot (or departing from the same depot toward the station as out-of-service train) by having the locomotive pushing from rear end of train, guided by workers from the other end of train using communication radio (to this day it is still performed there at Jakarta Kota station).

    Cheers,

    Arya.
    "Prepare for the worst, even if the result is actually better than the expected"

  8. #23

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    This is the video of how grade crossing guard man operates the grade crossing that uses "hand-generator" handle, complete with the radio communication with neighboring crossings:



    The grade crossing itself is located just beside the now-closed Ketandan station (closed in 2007 due to double track construction project). Since the grade crossing is located in the Klaten Regency of Central Java Province, the guard man perform communications with the neighboring crossings in Javanese language, or Indonesian language with Javanese dialect.

    Regards,

    Arya.
    "Prepare for the worst, even if the result is actually better than the expected"

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by aryadwi_ef641030 View Post
    I've decided to share some Google Maps links to locations where the old Krian-type roundel signals formerly used by the now-defunct Panarukan Line still stands in its original places
    Thank you. Fascinating hints of the abandoned railway with the remnant signals and in some places overgrown rails left in situ. It seems like many years since it was closed?

  10. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob View Post
    Thank you. Fascinating hints of the abandoned railway with the remnant signals and in some places overgrown rails left in situ. It seems like many years since it was closed?
    Panarukan Line itself was closed in 2004, which means it has been 16 years left since the closure, although for rail fans in Indonesia it seems to be not as long as the lines closed before 2000s. Fortunately the line has been slated for reopening, although there would be lots of work needed for upgrading the line:

    1. Upgrading track bed to withstand heavier trains;
    2. Replacing old Krian-type signals as well as manual Siemens & Halske signals with newer ones (probably recycling the semi-automatic interlocking Siemens & Halske ones that replaced by electric signals from another stations on mainline);
    3. Replacing bridges and rails, and;
    4. Renovating all stations to fulfill the current standard.

    One of the unique side of Panarukan Line is the presence of diamond crossing with sugarcane plantation line of Wringin Anom sugar refinery railway between former Tribungan station and Panarukan station (terminus of the line), and it was equipped with a special signal post that controls special signals and barriers that would prevent sugarcane trains from entering diamond crossing if the train of Panarukan Line is about to pass the diamond.

    Here is a footage recorded by a rail fan from Jember that shows the current condition of the unique Wringin Anom diamond crossing:



    Cheers,

    Arya.
    "Prepare for the worst, even if the result is actually better than the expected"

  11. #26

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    Recently I came across one of the photo that was published inside the 1925 Gedenkboek, where the photo shows one of the coach of type ABL-8000 (A: 1st class, B: 2nd class, L: vacuum brake-equipped, 8000: class number for coaches with 18.5m body) that was purchased by Staatsspoorwegen for reinforcing the fleet of their flagship express trains like Eendagsche Express (literally "one-day express"):



    (original photo scanned from the 1925 Gedenkboek, uploaded to Facebook by Faishal Ammar)

    The coaches were purchased in complete knock-down form, and assembled at what is known today as Balai Yasa Manggarai (during the Dutch East Indies period it was known as Werkplaats Manggarai). After the independence of Indonesia, the state of these coaches was unclear, though it was probably demoted to secondary services or even scrapped, as they were replaced by 20m-length all steel-bodied coaches of type ABL-9000 (1st + 2nd class), CL-9000 (3rd class), DL-9000 (baggage) etc. Unfortunately vacuum brake-fitted fleet of Indonesian Railways were slowly replaced by air brake-fitted fleet or even modified to use air brake, causing the last letter for indicating type of braking equipment to change from L to W (W itself refers to air brake in the pre-1986 Dutch East Indies-style numbering system for both coaches and freight cars, although those for freight cars were eliminated only after the introduction of current numbering system in 2010).



    And here is another interesting photo taken during the period of Operation Product (the first of "Politionele Acties", known in Indonesia as "Agresi Militer Belanda I"), where Kroya station was in heavily destroyed condition (unfortunately it is not clear whether it was caused by the attack from KNIL (Koninklijk Nederlands Indisch Leger, "Royal Netherlands East Indies Army"), or detonated by Indonesian Railways and the army to prevent KNIL from taking over the station in complete condition). The same photo shows CC5019 (former SS1600 #1619) in a somewhat still complete condition, though some report said that the cylinder of CC5019 was detonated by Indonesian Railways using dynamite as a measure for preventing KNIL's forced takeover of the locomotive.



    (original photo by Gahetna, digitalized by Yoga Bagus Prayogo Cokroprawiro and uploaded to Facebook by Faishal Ammar)

    Note that the locomotive's number plate was still using the very distinct Japanese-style font, since the later Indonesian-style number plate was presumed to replace the Japanese-made ones in 1950s. This locomotive was later used in the film "Kereta Api Terakhir" (English: "Last Train", premiered in 1981) that was based on the real condition of the railway in Indonesia (particularly Central Java) during the event of Operation Product, where the Republic decided to took all of their remaining trains from territories captured by KNIL. Also in the background is the mechanical signal of Kroya station, which if judging from the shape of semaphore the signal itself is presumably the Siemens & Halske ones.

    Regards,

    Arya.
    Last edited by aryadwi_ef641030; September 13th, 2020 at 10:14 PM.
    "Prepare for the worst, even if the result is actually better than the expected"

  12. #27
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    Great photos.

  13. #28

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    Probably I had to dig more classic photos (as well as current photos) in both the web and my hard drive, since there are still many interesting photos of railways in Indonesia out there.
    "Prepare for the worst, even if the result is actually better than the expected"

  14. #29

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    This is one of a videography made by one of my friend that resides in the city of Yogyakarta, where the theme of this video is the arrival and departure of South Sumatra's famous heavy-haul coal train:



    The video was taken at Sukamenanti station, located to the south of Bandar Lampung city. Both trains are hauled by 3 units of CC202 series diesel locomotives (EMD model name: G26MC-2U), with the left one was led by CC202 43 (6th batch, delivered in 2008) and the right one had CC202 05 (1st batch, built in 1986) leading the train.

    Speaking of South Sumatra's coal train, I have a few photographs of those coal trains taken in the year 2014 (all of them were taken by my father):

    ===================(BEWARE OF LARGE IMAGES)===================









    Cheers,

    Arya.
    "Prepare for the worst, even if the result is actually better than the expected"

  15. #30
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    Thanks for sharing all of those photos and the interesting stories that go with them.


    70337:
    TRS19 Platinum, build 110491 SP2, Win10 Pro 64 bit, i7-7700 3.6GHz 16 GB, GTX 1070 Ti

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