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Thread: All about railways in Indonesia (beware of HD pics)

  1. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by martinvk View Post
    Thanks for sharing all of those photos and the interesting stories that go with them.
    You're welcome! Maybe I had to dig up again historical photos of railways in Indonesia in the Internet (especially Facebook), as each photos contains hidden stories behind it.
    "Prepare for the worst, even if the result is actually better than the expected"

  2. #32

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    And another historical photo:



    (photographed by an unknown photographer, collection of Mr. Harriman. Digitalized and uploaded to Facebook by Yoga Bagus Prayogo Cokroprawiro)

    D1404 (former SS1400 #1404) was prepared at Cianjur locomotive depot before hauling local train during the late days of steam operation on Bogor - Padalarang line. Unfortunately the loco has been scrapped long time ago, and even the Cianjur locomotive depot (the location where this locomotive was photographed) has been abolished a few years ago. Fortunately track section of Bogor - Padalarang Line up to Cipatat station has been heavily upgraded with 54kg rails and concrete sleepers, as this line is considered as one of important line for local transportation around Sukabumi and Cianjur. On the other hand, section from Cipatat to Padalarang is still in uncertain condition, as the section between Cipatat and Tagogapu is known as one of the steepest track section of a non-rack rail line in Indonesia. Due to this problem, track upgrade works are done from both end of the line, with the last section to be upgraded is the Cipatat - Tagogapu section.

    Regards,

    Arya.
    "Prepare for the worst, even if the result is actually better than the expected"

  3. #33

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    Here is another historical photo:



    (part of collection of Mr. Harriman. Uploaded to Facebook by Faishal Ammar)

    Two electric locomotives of former Elektrische Staatsspoorwegen were photographed inside the Bukit Duri depot in the period between late 60s and early 70s. The front one was the former ESS3100 series #3102 (renumbered as #102), and the rear one was thought to be former ESS3300 series #3301 (renumbered as #301). While the two locomotives were unable to be saved from scrap torches, but Bukit Duri depot itself still stands until today, although it is now used by ex-Japan EMUs as well as a pair of former MCW302 series DMU numbered NW-82243 and NW-87202, used as Noodrijtuigen a.k.a work train for accident recovery. Unfortunately, Bukit Duri depot is very infamous among many rail fans in Indonesia for its "prone to flooding" condition, due to its proximity within the area of Ciliwung river (the rear end of depot is only a few meters from the outermost border of Ciliwung River and the land).

    Regards,

    Arya.
    "Prepare for the worst, even if the result is actually better than the expected"

  4. #34
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    Great photos, Arya.

    The electric locomotives look much like our early box motors built by General Electric and Westinghouse during the early part of the 20th Century. Like a lot of interesting railway equipment and infrastructure, much is scrapped without thought of preserving the unique equipment or buildings. You're lucky the station was preserved, we lost a lot over here due to urban renewal as the stations and building lost their purpose.

    https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/...0453e42a_b.jpg
    John
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  5. #35

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    Fortunately historical buildings like stations, locomotive depots etc in Indonesia that were from Dutch East Indies period are still in regular use, though it is also noted that large example of similar buildings that stood on disused lines are now in heavily derelict condition. But with plans to restore rail services on some of disused lines (outside former lightly laid lines, known among both Dutch and Indonesian rail fans as "stoomtram", as railway lines that fell into the category were mainly built using technical specification similar to an ordinary tram line), it is predicted that more historical station buildings would be restored into functional condition (of course all of them are fitted with air conditioner, because of very hot temperature in Indonesia ).

    Quote Originally Posted by JCitron View Post
    The electric locomotives look much like our early box motors built by General Electric and Westinghouse during the early part of the 20th Century.
    The locomotives were mainly manufactured by European factories, though some of them like former ESS3200 series of Elektrische Staatsspoorwegen were manufactured with Westinghouse-licensed components by Heemaf of Netherlands. And of course I have the photo of ESS3201 in its post-preservation days, though the usage of blue color was heavily criticized by some of history experts among senior rail fans as "historically inaccurate" (as the original color would be actually dark brown; the blue color itself was used in the photography inside the pamphlet distributed by Werkspoor Amsterdam because of the limitation of printing technology in 1920s):





    (all of the photographs were taken by myself on September 2016)

    Since the locomotive was restored using pantographs and some of traction components from former KL3-76 series EMU (or one of its sub-variants), ESS3201 is now slightly different if compared to its original condition.

    Cheers,

    Arya.
    Last edited by aryadwi_ef641030; September 16th, 2020 at 10:58 AM.
    "Prepare for the worst, even if the result is actually better than the expected"

  6. #36
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    That's great news that the lines are being restored with the lightly built lines being an exception of course.

    I read about the use of blue like that in early days of photography. When I saw the black and white picture above, my assumption was the locomotive was either dark brown, or a dark green, which were common colors here as well for these locomotives. Later on they gained other colors, but those from the same era were as mentioned. Westinghouse made components for companies throughout the world so that makes sense. The box motors do look similar.
    John
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  7. #37

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    A few years ago I read some statements from my friend that "had The Great Depression does not happen, plans for electrifying main line railways in Dutch East Indies (particularly Java) would become a reality". This statement was based from an historical map of railways in Java, where main line that extends from Batavia (compasses the current Jakarta) toward the east had been marked with slightly thicker line that indicates it would be electrified at 1.5kV DC, which is the same with the standard for conventional line's electrification employed in Netherlands. While electrification plan for lines outside Jakarta were revived once in 1980s, but it would took very long time until this year, where a separate electrification work (yes, it is separate from those in Jakarta and the surrounding cities) was started in the section between Yogyakarta and Solo cities.

    Unfortunately it is not clear whether Indonesian Railways would revive the usage of electric locomotives for long distance services, as currently there are no plans to revive electrification plan for long distance lines...
    "Prepare for the worst, even if the result is actually better than the expected"

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by aryadwi_ef641030 View Post
    A few years ago I read some statements from my friend that "had The Great Depression does not happen, plans for electrifying main line railways in Dutch East Indies (particularly Java) would become a reality". This statement was based from an historical map of railways in Java, where main line that extends from Batavia (compasses the current Jakarta) toward the east had been marked with slightly thicker line that indicates it would be electrified at 1.5kV DC, which is the same with the standard for conventional line's electrification employed in Netherlands. While electrification plan for lines outside Jakarta were revived once in 1980s, but it would took very long time until this year, where a separate electrification work (yes, it is separate from those in Jakarta and the surrounding cities) was started in the section between Yogyakarta and Solo cities.

    Unfortunately it is not clear whether Indonesian Railways would revive the usage of electric locomotives for long distance services, as currently there are no plans to revive electrification plan for long distance lines...
    It would be smart if they did revive plans for long distance service as that would be more efficient.

    This sounds familiar. I'm sure there are regrets the system was never completed in the first place because today's costs are so much higher.

    Where I live the Boston and Maine, our local railroad here had electrified 10 miles/16 km of track through a tunneled region with help from the nearby New Haven. The tunnel was once one of the longest tunnels in the world when completed in 1877, and took 25 years to build. The electrification lasted for 36 years and it was a diesel locomotive-pulled freight that did the electric service in in 1946. When the railroad electrified that short portion, it's larger owner the New Haven, had great plans to electrify the lines between Springfield and New Haven, New Haven to Boston, and other portions north of Boston. This was back around 1910-1915. It took until the early 2000s to complete the Northeast Corridor electrification to Boston from New Haven, and there is now discussions off and on about electrifying the line to Springfield. Will it happen? I'm not holding my breath.
    John
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  9. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by JCitron View Post
    It would be smart if they did revive plans for long distance service as that would be more efficient.

    This sounds familiar. I'm sure there are regrets the system was never completed in the first place because today's costs are so much higher.
    You're right. Though many Indonesians said that it was the Great Depression that smashes the first plan for long distance electrification devised by Dutch people back in the days of Dutch East Indies, the second plan devised with the help from Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) in 1980s was also frozen by unstable political and financial situation in Indonesia in late 1980s to 1990s. With the increasing demand of electricity that went farther than the capability of electricity production, some of rail fans here in Indonesia doubted that long-distance electrification would become a reality...
    "Prepare for the worst, even if the result is actually better than the expected"

  10. #40

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    Another valuable collection of rare photo of Indonesian trains in the past:



    (original photo by the late M.V.A Krishnamurti, collection of Indra Krishnamurti. Uploaded to Facebook by Faishal Ammar)

    This is the photo of semi-streamlined passenger coach manufactured by PT Industri Nasional Kereta Api (INKA) for Indonesian Railways in 1997, the year when Indonesia was badly hit by Asian Financial Crisis (which triggered the May 1998 riots and the resignation of Soeharto as the 2nd president of Indonesia). These coaches utilized large number of the then state-of-art technologies and designs that were still not available in Indonesia like bolsterless bogies with air suspension (which was designed and manufactured by Alstom using those installed on TGV trainsets as its base), semi-automatically operated passenger door (using plug doors like European ones), continuous side windows with sleek appearance, etc. Due to the usage of air suspension on its bogies, the head-end power generator car had an air compressor for supplying air to the suspensions, resulting in the presence of 4 air hoses instead of only 1 for each end.

    The example in this photograph was captured when it was still underwent trial runs between Madiun and Solo just after the completion. These coaches were followed by 2nd batch units delivered to Indonesian Railways in year 2001, which share similar designs with the 1997 ones. Under the 1986-style numbering system, each units of the 1st batch delivered in 1997 were classified as "K1-979xx" for 1st class coach, "M1-979xx" for dining car, and "BP-979xx" for head-end power generator car, while the 2nd batch were given number "K1-20019xx" , "M1-20019xx" and "BP-20019xx" (though the 2 nd batc h ones were sometimes called as "K1-019xx", "M1-019xx" and "BP-019xx" for convenience).

    Unfortunately many of the "state-of-art" technologies installed in these coaches were soon causing problems within regular operations due to poor maintenance condition and too high utilization rate on long distance express trains, with the climax was the 2010 derailment at Manggarai Station that forces Indonesian Railways to remove all of these coaches from regular service and returns them to PT INKA for repairment, where problematic parts were removed or replaced with the more ordinary ones, as well as modernization of toilet equipments to become environment-friendly toilet. Originally they still kept their original semi-automatic plug doors, but later they were changed into the manually-opened ones between 2014 to 2017 due to technical malfunctions. Many rail fans regrets the decision for "downgrading" some parts of these coaches (especially the bolsterless bogie had lost its capability to give more comfortable ride than the ordinary ones), although they also admit that these coaches were introduced in the "false time" and "unsuitable technical condition" that eventually giving bad effects on these coaches.

    Regards,

    Arya.
    "Prepare for the worst, even if the result is actually better than the expected"

  11. #41

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    Another historic photo:



    (original photo by Rob Dickinson, uploaded to Facebook by an account named "Buyunk Aktuil")

    This is the photograph of D14 series steam locomotive (former SS1400) number D1404 when hauling local train on Bogor - Padalarang line, probably in 1970s or 1980s. The train is seen here stopping at Cilaku station, with one wooden-bodied 3rd class coach is the only coach hauled by this locomotive. Also seen here in this photograph is two levers for operating Krian-type mechanical signals located beside the station building, covered by a small roof for protecting signal levers from being wet due to rain (at that time stations that equipped with Krian signals only had home signals, or in some cases, distant signals; there are no departure signals and all of the switches were "switchstand" type manually operated by station employees).

    Cilaku station was temporarily closed in 2001 due to landslide inside Lampegan tunnel, and although the station has underwent modernization work (including the construction of new signalman room at the location where levers for operating Krian signals were once stood, along with installation of Siemens & Halske semaphore signals in place of the aging Krian signals) in preparation for the introduction of a new local passenger train serving Sukabumi and Cianjur regencies (which was named "Siliwangi"), the station was later permanently closed by Indonesian Railways due to low ridership. Because of this situation, the local train "Siliwangi" does not stop at Cilaku station at all since the beginning of its regular operation.

    *until September 20th, 2020, "Siliwangi" train serves Sukabumi to Ciranjang section of Bogor - Padalarang line. With the reopening of Ciranjang to Cipatat section, the train is now extended to Cipatat station.
    "Prepare for the worst, even if the result is actually better than the expected"

  12. #42

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    The current state of Yogyakarta station during the electrification work of Yogyakarta - Solo section of South Java Main Line per September 24th, 2020:



    (original photo by Ragil Setianto)

    Because there is a requirement for not removing large platform roofs when installing overhead line equipments, Indonesian Railways employs rigid overhead line for electrifying tracks inside the station premises. This situation also happens with the neighboring Lempuyangan station, where same situation causes Indonesian Railways to employ rigid overhead line inside passenger platform premises of Lempuyangan station (freight sidings uses normal ones, as there are no large platform roofs that spans over there).

    Regards,

    Arya.
    "Prepare for the worst, even if the result is actually better than the expected"

  13. #43
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    Arya,

    I'm really enjoying your blog here on your railways.

    It's interesting why they use the rigid catenary rather than regular wire. The rigid catenary also looks like the old Märklin catenary used on their Gage 1 and HO models. We need to get someone to make some of that for us because there are places where we could use it on our routes.

    The old steam-pulled local above looks like a scene from the 1940s or 1950s even if it's not.
    John
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  14. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by JCitron View Post
    It's interesting why they use the rigid catenary rather than regular wire
    The usage of rigid catenary itself is particularly to allow catenary to be installed under platform roofs without need to dismantling platform roof itself, which is for saving time required during the construction of catenary inside the station (the electrification work itself is done at a somewhat high pace; in fact, the current pandemic actually allows the electrification project between Yogyakarta and Solo to be executed as a single project, as the electrification project was originally planned as a two-phase project that covers Yogyakarta - Klaten section for first phase, and Klaten - Solo Balapan section as the second phase). For stations that does not have large roof spanning over the tracks, regular wire ones were used.

    While rigid catenary itself is still brand new in Indonesia, currently there are two operational examples, with the first example is the ones found at Soekarno-Hatta International Airport Station in Jakarta. One of the main reason for the usage of rigid catenary is because the track was constructed by partially reusing right-of-way of public road inside the airport, and the right-of-way itself crosses under the taxiway that connects North Runway (Terminal #2 and #3) and South Runway (Terminal #1), as well as overpasses for internal access road (between Terminal #1 and #2) and public road, as shown in the following Google Streetview pictures:

    1. https://www.google.com/maps/@-6.1302...7i16384!8i8192 - transition point from ordinary catenary to rigid catenary
    2. https://www.google.com/maps/@-6.1298...7i16384!8i8192 - inside the tunnel that passes under taxiway. Note that support pylons are installed on the border between track and road
    3. https://www.google.com/maps/@-6.1285...7i16384!8i8192 - near the airport station

    Quote Originally Posted by JCitron View Post
    The old steam-pulled local above looks like a scene from the 1940s or 1950s even if it's not.
    You're right. Even in 1970s to early 1980s most of branch line local trains in Indonesia were still hauled by steam locos, although they were slowly replaced by diesel powers (either it could be diesel locomotives or even DMUs) or even completely stopped its operation without any replacement due to closure of branch lines. While the closure of branch lines of Indonesian Railways from 1970s until this day were mostly fueled by motorization (including the presence of local buses or even long-distance buses that runs faster than branch line trains), AFAIK two lines were closed in 1970s and 1980s partially due to natural disaster:

    1. Ambarawa Line

    This line was permanently closed in 1976 after a very disastrous volcanic mudflow that destroys one of the span of Krasak river bridge in 1975. The bridge itself is located just to the north of Tempel Station, with the Krasak river is right on the border between Central Java and Special Region of Yogyakarta provinces. As the damage was deemed beyond repair, Indonesian Railways decided to completely discontinue trains of Ambarawa Line in 1976, excluding the Ambarawa to Bedono section that was reopened as a tourist line. While this line is planned to be reopened for traffic, the notoriously steep rack rail section between Jambu and Gemawang stations caused the restoration work for the line to be temporarily stopped for unknown time period.

    2. Cikajang Line

    Half of line from Garut station to Cikajang station was closed in 1982 after the eruption of Mount Galunggung in the same year, which causes damages on trackbed and some of bridges. The line was later completely closed in 1983 due to metal damages suffered by steam locomotives stationed at Cibatu locomotive depot, where the culprit was the volcanic ashes from the same eruption in 1982 that contaminates water used by these locomotives (even the Mallet locomotives like CC10, DD52 and CC50 were found having the boiler damaged by corrosions that caused by the contamination of volcanic ashes). Fortunately this line is scheduled to be reopened to passenger service soon using diesel-hauled trains, as this line plays a key role for reducing traffic congestion between Garut and Bandung cities.
    "Prepare for the worst, even if the result is actually better than the expected"

  15. #45
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    Thank you for the explanation on the rigid catenary. I followed the road through the tunnel and also looked at earlier shots, pre-2015 when available. I'm glad the railway was put through and the road narrowed. That airport station is amazing looking. I noticed that the road travel direction changed from left hand running to right hand running. That must've confused the drivers when that change took place!

    It's sad to see steam go, but then again there's so much more maintenance required. The bucolic scene though really is classic. Thank you for the background information on that.
    John
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