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Thread: Fried Egg Sandwiches

  1. #1
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    Default Fried Egg Sandwiches

    I'm back with more food questions for my British, Australian and New Zealand friends. I understand that fried egg sandwiches are a common meal. Now I grew up eating fried egg sandwiches here in Alabama served with the yolk still runny on white sandwich bread. Rather plain but quite tasty as I remember. What I would like to know is what are the various ways that you enjoy them?

    Thank you in advance,
    William

  2. #2
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    ... although i'm not british, nor australian and neither a newzealander, but just an european, i want to share also my childhood memory of a delicious egg-dish :
    ... in the sixties my parents had a kind of toaster pliers with round iron cups, in which you lay a slice of bread in each leg and in one of the slices you put a raw egg with onion chips and salt and pepper ... when you close the legs the iron cups cut off the slices in round crepes ... holding it some minutes above the flames of the gas burner or in the stove it created a round grilled sandwich : kind of filled crepes ... it depended of the time whether you had the yolk still running or not .. matter of experimentation ...
    i never saw this attribute in my life again ... but i wish i could find such fine toaster some day .... it's on my bucketlist ...
    eet smakelijk
    grtz
    daveric

  3. #3
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    I like fried egg sandwiches with mustard. I prefer the yolk hard.
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  4. #4
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    We had one of those toasted sandwich makers at home when I was growing up too zsuda.
    I used to make French toast for my children when they were growing up and they loved it. Very simple; - break eggs into a bowl and beat yolks and whites together, add any seasoning to taste, then thoroughly soak slices of bread in the mixture and fry in an iron frying pan. I always used iron frying pans because it's a lot easier to control the heat and the heat is a lot more even.
    Last edited by KotangaGirl; June 5th, 2020 at 06:14 PM. Reason: spelling
    Narcolepsy is not napping.



  5. #5
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    This is how I used too enjoy a good fry up when helping to restore locomotives.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YEBZWgUKh80

  6. #6
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    As a kid in England my mother used to make me egg omelette sandwiches to take for school lunches. They would have been eaten cold and probably tasted disgusting but I was a weird kid. Can't say I've ever seen a fried egg sandwich.

    The Kiwi "toastie" has emigrated across the Tasman and now you'll see it advertised in Oz cafes. Most of us still call it a toasted sandwich. It works for breakfast, lunch and dinner.

    During the shutdown lots of folk here got interested in making their own bread. My own attempts have been very ordinary.

    Paul


  7. #7
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    I take great pride, time, and expertise, in making an "easy over egg", so that the yoke is still partly runny inside, and flip it onto rye toast, or English muffin, carefully poke the yoke, so that it drizzles out covering the bread, but not running over the edges off onto the plate, so that my guests get a bread soaked in runny hot egg, with golden brown toasted pork scrapple, bacon, and a home fried potato patty. A toasted "Everything" bagel, smothered with cream cheese, and jelly. What this has to do with Trainz, is beyond me. Just say NO to Vegamite (a food spread made from leftover brewers' yeast) !
    Last edited by MP242; June 5th, 2020 at 08:26 PM.
    The expression: "Avoiding it like it is the Plague" just doesn't make any sense. Humans just don't do that very well.

  8. #8

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    Or you can go the fancy way. We used to cut a circular hole in the bread, and fry it and the egg on a BBQ. No trains required lol.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by zsuda View Post
    ... although i'm not british, nor australian and neither a newzealander, but just an european, i want to share also my childhood memory of a delicious egg-dish :
    ... in the sixties my parents had a kind of toaster pliers with round iron cups, in which you lay a slice of bread in each leg and in one of the slices you put a raw egg with onion chips and salt and pepper ... when you close the legs the iron cups cut off the slices in round crepes ... holding it some minutes above the flames of the gas burner or in the stove it created a round grilled sandwich : kind of filled crepes ... it depended of the time whether you had the yolk still running or not .. matter of experimentation ...
    i never saw this attribute in my life again ... but i wish i could find such fine toaster some day .... it's on my bucketlist ...
    eet smakelijk
    grtz
    daveric
    I still have the one my parents used. We called it the "Iron Bra" because that's what it resembled when opened up. The handles were about 18-inches long so you wouldn't burn yourself when using it at a campfire for melting chocolate s'mores.

    Bill
    Name: Bill (USN, Retired) Into computers over 55 years
    User ID: 202442
    Trainzer since: 2003
    Currently using: T:ANE (SP4)

  10. #10
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    In Australia we called those "Waffle Irons". When I was young we had a dutch oven. That is a wood stove without a hob. The fire was set on top of the oven. There were swing arms at the side of the chimney to hook pots and kettles, then swing them over the fire. We used the waffle irons in the fire.
    Cheers,
    Mike

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by MP242 View Post
    ... what this has to do with trainz, is beyond me ...
    ... in dutch fried egg (spiegelei) is the nickname of that attribute used by the station manager to signal the train that it is safe to depart ... the photo is from the site of dutchman nico spilt : very interesting, multilanguistic information ...



    very nice to see more trainzers recognize the iron bra (beautiful name ..) ... if somebody knows an adress where i can still buy one, i'm very happy ...
    the way of preparing fried egg sandwich by kotangagirl is my favorite alternative ... but honestly : i prefer it more when the egg is grown up and has become fried chicken ... stuffed and grilled ... but that is another thread ...
    grtz
    daveric
    Last edited by zsuda; June 6th, 2020 at 02:27 AM.

  12. #12
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    Wow, thank you all for the wonderful replies. And yes, everyone is welcome to add their story to the thread regardless of where you are.

    Now that I am retired, I am exploring my family's history. In particular, how my childhood in the 60s was similar to life in England where my ancestors came from all those years ago. The southeastern United States was settled by people from England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland. It is amazing how many of their traditions remain here. I guess bringing a bit of home with you lessened the pain of leaving your old life behind. I've visited Australia and England and was amazed at how at home I felt.

    So again, thank you for sharing your own stories with me. It means a great deal to me to hear them.

    William

  13. #13
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    To me, understanding the people that built and ran the railroads is a part of the railroad's history. It helps to understand why they did what they did. Railroads changed the world by making it possible to travel great distances or to sell goods in far away markets. My grandmother on my father's side was born in 1888 in Dalton, Georgia. She was a child in a world where the average person rarely traveled more than a hundred miles from home. She married my grandfather in 1904 and together they rode a train to a new life in Birmingham, Alabama. Birmingham was a new city having just been founded in 1871 at the crossing of two railroads that ran north to south and east to west. Like its namesake in England it was an industrial city with all the ingredients nearby to make steel. Once great blast furnaces ran night and day along the north to south railroad lines that divided the city into two halves. As a child it seemed like I was never very far away from a train track.

    I'm proud of my working class background and fascinated by how much I still have in common with my distant cousins.

    William

    daveric,
    My DNA profile does cover parts of western Europe too so maybe we share an ancestor or two as well.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by wreeder View Post
    ... My DNA profile does cover parts of western Europe too so maybe we share an ancestor or two as well ...
    william
    my dna profile, i did in 2018, gives an estimated ethnicity : 50.5 % asia, 47.7 % europe (17,3 % irish, scottish and welsh) and 1.8 % (mid)america ... in the list of potential family in some degree i have not yet come across the name reeder (if that is your last name) ...
    my trainrootz is in the dutch east indies (since 1949 indonesia), where my father was a station manager (kepala stasiun) in sukabumi and bogor (my birthplace) and where my mother's father (dutch) was a chief instructor workshop in poerwakarta .. see for photos in the link of my signature under "chief" ...

    enjoy your status of retirement in good health ...
    grtz
    daveric

  15. #15
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    Hi,

    I've traced the male lines of Reeder, Overton, Burdette or Burdett (my great grandfather dropped the "e" when he enlisted in the Civil War) and Smith. Overton and Burdette have gone back the furthest and seem to be Norman in origin. They both had estates for hundreds of years. Overton appears to be the anglicized version of D' Overton which since the estate was near Dover makes sense. With Burdette I've made it back to the Conquest, Charles Burdette was a commander in the Norman army and was awarded an estate in Yorkshire where the family lived until the 1890s. It is now a home for retirees. I was very lucky in that both the Burdette and Overton families are well documented and researched by others.

    The Reeder name goes back to the 1500s near Kent. Simon Reeder was born in Bedworth, Warwickshire in 1641. He came to the colonies as a skilled laborer. He was given 25 acres of land for making the trip. By the time he died in 1685, he had increased that to 250 acres of land. But he never learn to read and signed his will with an "X" as his mark. That name might also had been spelt as Redder or Ruder before 1535 but I have no proof. Smith as you can imagine is tough to trace. They made a habit of marrying cousins.

    Ancestry keeps revising DNA results as they add people but at the moment I am 76% English, Wales and western Europe. Ireland and Scotland is 23% with > 1% Native American.

    Best wishes

    William

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