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Thread: The slow motion drop

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    New Zealand, Horowhenua, Levin
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    854
     

    Default The slow motion drop

    My RTX 2060 Super arrived yesterday to replace my 1060. Some women may get excited about buying new clothes, but for myself it is a video card - weird huh . Being the perfect time to blow out the dust and any fluff bunnies from my main pc case all went well and then popped the new gpu into the pci-e slot with ease. The moment the pc is turned it, there is a small bit of apprehension on my part, but the gpu jumped into life and purred very quietly in it's new home. All is perfect.

    Now it was time to replace the video card in my previous main case with the 1060 and give the other gpu back to my partner. Outside I went again, this time to blow the dust from the 1060 to make it squeaky clean once more. What a pleasant day it was, sun shining, birds singing. The fans spun as the blower air hit them and having not watched where I had placed a couple of fingers on the card, the fan blades knocked a finger, gave me a start and I automatically let go of the card, where I watched it fall onto the concrete as if in slow motion. The drop was approx 76 cm. The perfect day was no longer perfect and I was gutted as well as shaking my head at my own stupidity. However on inspection no visible damage was obvious - or so I thought. Anyway, went to pop the 1060 into my previous, faithful pc but it would not slot in. To my dismay, one of the metal pieces that slot into the space between the motherboard and back panel was bent.

    After having rung my partner to tell him the "news", the afternoon seemed to draw out longer than normal, but anyway 6.15pm came, partner was home and out with the pliers, straightened the metal piece for me and I then popped the 1060 into the pci-e slot. Without a glitch the card fired into life and ran perfectly when the pc was turned on - what a relief.

    Just thought I would share this as this was something that had not happened before and just shows how easily things can happen unintentionally and unexpectedly through ones own actions.
    Last edited by ARhian7; February 27th, 2020 at 02:37 PM. Reason: typo's
    "Every day may not be good, but there's something good in every day."

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    United States of America
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    139
     

    Default

    Next time, you may want to hold those fan blades from spinning. Compressed air can cause them to spin too fast and cause damage to the bearings.

    Glad it worked out for you this time!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    New Zealand, Horowhenua, Levin
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by autodctr View Post
    Next time, you may want to hold those fan blades from spinning. Compressed air can cause them to spin too fast and cause damage to the bearings.

    Glad it worked out for you this time!
    Thank you, will definitely do that next time.

    We have been using the small Ryobi blower attachment for a while now and works well removing dust. Though have used the canned compressed air in the past, it is very expensive here and the can does not last long. Plus product brand can be a bit of guess as to how good the air stream is. The actual air compressor itself is just a pain and I worry about any moisture that may be in the line.
    Last edited by ARhian7; March 1st, 2020 at 03:12 PM. Reason: added info
    "Every day may not be good, but there's something good in every day."

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Location
    United Kingdom
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    1
     

    Default

    And what kind of nozzle Ryobi?
    I usually use a paintbrush to remove dust, but it is not always possible to remove dust in hard-to-reach places.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    In Front Of My PC
    Posts
    678
     

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    I have a brand new 1.5 gallon wet dry vac (that I keep surgically clean) that I use the exhaust port as a blower to blow dust out of my desktop PC, and I have a micro attachment, of several micro brushes and small micro nozzles, to get in tight places. I drilled a 1/4" pressure relief hole in the hose, (that can be covered up with a piece of masking tape) so I don't get ridiculously high powered suction/blow on delicate areas. Yes pin your fan blades with small strips of masking tape, to prevent fan bearing over speed/back speed. I am a firm believer in Arctic Silver, or other silver compound, thermo paste heat sink compound
    Last edited by MP242; Today at 11:59 AM.
    My apologies to all. I have decided that in these horrible current events, we all need to stick together as a Community

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