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Thread: Coal Fired Electrical Generation Power Plants

  1. #1
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    Default Coal Fired Electrical Generation Power Plants

    I have a fairly large Coal Fired Electrical Generation Power Plant on my Trainz route, and previously thought that scrubbers in smoke stacks were fairly efficient at helping to clean up the pollution and smoke emitted at coal fired electrical generating power plants. At just one Coal Fired Florida Power & Light plant they burn one, 100 ton coal hopper, of pulverized coal, each and every 5 minutes, 24 hours per day, 365 days per year. That is a lot of coal being burned ! Coming out of the Powder River Coal Basin there are seventy five, 137 car coal trains per day, 365 days a year !

    Watching the TV show "Whaling Wars" I did some research on Whale meat, which I found out contains a huge amount of Mercury. Researching Mercury, I found that burning coal results in huge amounts of mercury pollution. Mercury is also a natural occurring heavy metal in the ocean. Fresh water fish also have huge amounts of Mercury contamination. From Mexico to the Florida panhandle, and up the Mississippi river, have the largest number of US toxic polluting chemical plants. While most other Countries have absolutely Zero EPA type restrictions on chemical and smoke pollution. Cities in China, and the likes of New Delhi, India, have smog so thick that it is absolutely toxic, and 12:00 noon looks as dark as 6:00 PM at night, and ALL photosynthesis is blocked out.

    In the winter I keep my house temperature at 67 degrees F, and I am freezing, while at the local doctors office they have the heat cranked up to 84 degrees F ! In the summer I keep my AC in the summer set at 75 degrees F. One summer day the electrical power went out, and within minutes people were immediately rushing out and evacuating their homes, and moving all their babies, a family of 5, into the running automobiles AC environment.

    My point is: OMG



    Last edited by MP242; December 6th, 2019 at 12:05 PM.
    My 4325 car RGCX train is 53.24 miles long, and takes 1 hour to pass through town !

  2. #2
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    Where I live there are signs posted saying DO NOT EAT THE FISH DUE HIGH AMOUNTS OF MERCURY, located next to every pond in the city. People still eat the fish as they catch the fish right under that sign that says do not eat the fish.

    The good news is coal is going away eventually and will only live on in our virtual worlds as we run polygons and pixels around on our big screen monitors. Sad part, however, heavy metals such as lead, mercury, and arsenic take decades to work their way out of the ecosystem if they can at all. Let's face it we screwed the pooch here and we'll pay for the mess for the rest of humanity.
    John
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  3. #3
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    Not looking especially good for mankind lasting beyond the end of this century though. Even if all the pollution stopped tomorrow the poisons are going to be still present in the environment for a long time to come.
    Narcolepsy is not napping.



  4. #4
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    On the bright side, in the 60's they estimated that we had a 250 year supply of coal in Wyoming, but today they re-estimate that we have depleted most of it, and only have 30 more years of coal left, and oil in the Mid East will run dry in 30 years (the estimates may be even less, as if we run out of natural gas, then the coal and oil amounts will dwindle more quickly), but by then pollution will be less, as we won't have anything more to burn, and we will be re-digging up the landfills for fuel sources, and turning recycling materials into our next naturally occurring continual renewable fuel resource. I saved up all my thousands of soda and beer cans ever since 1980 and recycled all those hundreds and hundreds of pounds of flattened alluminium cans, and they gave me $23.04 (I think their recycling weighing scale is totally crooked, as I got totally robbed, as they told me the total weight of an over brimming full size 1991 Ford F-150 pickup truck bed chock full of flattened alluminium cans was a mere 104 pounds) !
    Last edited by MP242; December 6th, 2019 at 05:36 PM.
    My 4325 car RGCX train is 53.24 miles long, and takes 1 hour to pass through town !

  5. #5
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    Case of too little too late.
    As it stands those more responsible countries efforts to reduce carbon emissions, plastic waste etc are cancelled out or worse by those countries who clearly can not be bothered, can't see that changing any time soon.
    Here's a thought ;o)
    I have often wondered what effect digging holes all over the planet and burning up oil and coal has on the mass of the planet and if this has any effect on the speed of rotation and orbit around the sun and if that could be a contributory factor in Global warming.
    As it appears a couple of degrees warmer is going to create a global catastrophe, then surely millions of tons of the planet being consumed may also have an undesirable effect.

    Time for the Human race to go where no Man has gone before and find another planet to wreck?
    Malc


  6. #6
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    The pit I worked in closed in the mid 90's not enough coal to stay open
    The same pit has now reopened and ripping coal out with a long wall. more up to date technology available

    The government increased the cost of most drinks in glass, plastic and aluminium
    There worth 10c each to return to a recycle station now
    I get about $60-$120 a year on beer and soft drink bottles and cans
    CFI A1120 Pharaoh Evo
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by big_b View Post
    The pit I worked in closed in the mid 90's not enough coal to stay open
    The same pit has now reopened and ripping coal out with a long wall. more up to date technology available

    The government increased the cost of most drinks in glass, plastic and aluminium
    There worth 10c each to return to a recycle station now
    I get about $60-$120 a year on beer and soft drink bottles and cans
    My pit closed in 1973 somewhat unexpectedly, I left just before it got shut down, joined the RN in January, Pit closed in June, just as well as there wasn't much future in the UK coal industry.
    Malc


  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by clam1952 View Post
    Time for the Human race to go where no Man has gone before and find another planet to wreck?
    A very interesting 1 hour long History Channel show summed up Earth's mankind as: "The very early Europeans quickly cut down ALL the forests for lumber and heating, annihilated the indigenous peoples, overpopulated far too much, absolutely devastated their local eco system, experienced severe drought, erosion, crop blights, starvation and famine, developed and spread fatal contagious diseases and plagues", and then "Moved Onward" to wreck the "New World". Where they did it all over again: "Quickly cut down ALL the forests for lumber and heating, annihilated the indigenous peoples, overpopulated far too much, absolutely devastated their local eco system, experienced severe drought, erosion, crop blights, starvation and famine, developed and spread fatal contagious diseases and plagues", etc, etc
    Last edited by MP242; December 6th, 2019 at 08:54 PM.
    My 4325 car RGCX train is 53.24 miles long, and takes 1 hour to pass through town !

  9. #9
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    America's coal consumption is collapsing

    Robinson Meyer - The Atlantic - Tuesday, January 7, 2020

    Here’s the good news, such as it is, for the climate: American coal consumption plunged last year, reaching its lowest level since 1975, as electrical utilities switched to cheaper natural gas and renewables. Over the past decade and a half, coal’s collapse has saved tens of thousands of lives nationwide, according to new research, and cut national greenhouse-gas emissions by more than 10 percent.
    The bad news is almost everything else. Outside of the power sector, the country’s planet-warming pollution continued to grow last year. Almost three decades after climate change first became a political issue, the American economy remains a continent-sized machine that guzzles fossil fuels and excretes money.
    Those are the major takeaways from an estimate of the United States’ 2019 greenhouse-gas emissions, published today by the Rhodium Group, a private energy-research firm. Last year, American greenhouse-gas pollution fell by 2.1 percent, driven almost entirely by coal’s decline and a plodding economy. While that decline is nominally good—especially compared with 2018, when American emissions actually increased overall—it is not happening fast enough.
    “We see nothing currently planned at the federal or the state level that is going to put the U.S. on track for the Paris Agreement target,” Trevor Houser, an author of the report and a partner at the Rhodium Group, told me. “It is still possible to reduce emissions fast enough to meet that target, but it would require a rapid and ambitious change in federal climate policy.”
    The United States is the world’s second biggest emitter of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases, which cause both ocean acidification and global warming. While the United States is responsible for about 14 percent of all annual greenhouse emissions today, it is the largest all-time source of cumulative carbon pollution. And as it is the world’s largest consumer market, its energy system and federal policies play an outsize role in helping new technologies achieve mass scale and low cost.
    Read: How coal country becomes solar country
    The new report tells two different stories about emissions last year. The first—and far more upbeat—is that coal consumption is cratering. American coal use fell 18 percent last year, pulling down the power sector’s overall emissions by almost 10 percent. It was the largest drop in coal consumption in history. “Coal ended the decade at less than half the level that it started the decade, which is remarkable,” Houser said.
    As coal declined, the health of ordinary Americans improved. From 2005 to 2016, coal-plant shutdowns led to such significant air-quality improvements that they saved the lives of about 26,000 Americans, according to a separate study published this week in Nature Sustainability. (Data is not yet available to extrapolate those results to 2019.)
    Related video: Why coal energy is harder to justify (provided by The Indianapolis Star)
    Jennifer Burney, the author of that study and an environmental scientist at UC San Diego, told me that whenever a coal plant closes, the statistical likelihood of death by any cause falls by “just shy of 1 percent” in any county within 15 miles. Infants and senior citizens see the greatest declines in mortality. And some of the worst toxic pollutants disappear from the air within days of a plant closure, she said. Carbon dioxide is, alas, not among them: It can linger in the atmosphere for hundreds of years, capturing heat and intensifying global warming all the while.
    But the switch from coal to natural gas has not been wholly good for American emissions. As utilities have adopted natural gas, they have created a vast and exceptionally leaky apparatus for moving it around the country. Some critics argue that this infrastructure is as bad for the climate as the coal system that it is replacing, because, in the shorter term, methane captures more heat in the atmosphere than carbon dioxide.
    While there was a “meaningful increase in oil and gas methane emissions last year,” it was “not enough to offset the decline in coal generation entirely,” Houser said. About a third of the greenhouse-gas reductions from coal’s decline have been eaten by methane leaks and by outright pollution from burning natural gas, he said.
    Net American Greenhouse-Gas Emissions by Sector, 2005-2019
    My 4325 car RGCX train is 53.24 miles long, and takes 1 hour to pass through town !

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