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Thread: Linux and Proton.

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by KotangaGirl View Post
    ...
    I never liked Ubuntu and much prefer using Debian instead.
    Any particular reason? Based on this discussion I was thinking of reinstalling VM Workstation and Ubuntu.

    Paul


  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by pcas1986 View Post
    Any particular reason? Based on this discussion I was thinking of reinstalling VM Workstation and Ubuntu.
    This Linux talk did that to me too! I already have Ubuntu running and use that for some chores such as I mentioned, but tonight I reinstalled Solaris and Oracle Server (Red Hat) so I can play with it again and reacquire my tech skills not that I'll use them anytime soon, but more to dust off the brain cells for a bit. The Oracle Server comes as part of a developer-day pre-built VM directly from Oracle. Import the appliance and the VM is done. There's no install and that's the best part.
    John
    Trainz User Since: 12-2003
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  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by pcas1986 View Post
    Any particular reason? Based on this discussion I was thinking of reinstalling VM Workstation and Ubuntu.
    Mostly to do with personal preference to do with the desktop and the way the menus worked. Debian just seemed to have a cleaner and less complicated approach to things and it wasn't dressed up in fake Windows makeup like Ubuntu was.
    Narcolepsy is not napping.



  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by KotangaGirl View Post
    Mostly to do with personal preference to do with the desktop and the way the menus worked. Debian just seemed to have a cleaner and less complicated approach to things and it wasn't dressed up in fake Windows makeup like Ubuntu was.
    I thought it might have been although I was hoping it might have had a technical purpose. The "fake Windows" effect was the main reason I lost interest in Ubuntu as I said before.

    Like John, I will have another look but might prowl through the distros first to see what generates the most interest.

    Paul


  5. #20
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    I use Xubuntu: same kernel and programs, but a much simpler desktop. Since it is debian based, it is very simple to install programs too.

  6. #21
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    I currently have Mint on an old laptop which is Debian derived and did have PCLinuxOS Originally a Mandrake fork RPM Distro which I prefer on a PC which has now given up the ghost. I prefer the KDE Plasma Desktop.

    You can use any of the desktops on any distribution, you don't have to use what it comes with, I'm using Cinnamon on Mint.

    I gave up with Macs when they went Intel.
    Malc


  7. #22
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    I got to Xubuntu when I was looking for a lighter desktop to put on some older machines. (I build them outta old parts and give them to people that couldn't afford them otherwise.) Even the newest Xubuntu release (18.04) runs on just about anything. I have a very old ASUS EEEPC that runs fine on it.....a little slow, but it was way slower on Win XP that it came with. It is an 800mhz with 1 gig RAM. And it runs with no lockups. No Windows OS since XP would even attempt to run on those specs.

  8. #23
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    That was always the most useful thing about Linux, - it could be used to give new life to old 'obsolete' computers. I used to pick up old laptops very cheaply and change the OS to Debian which would give me a useful machine for when I was doing quite a lot of assignment work and essays back when I was doing tertiary study.
    Narcolepsy is not napping.



  9. #24
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    I've used a few OSes in my time, leaving aside the PDP11 and Vaxes, on Intel-based hardware I've had everything from Dos to Windows 10 with the exception of Vista and 8, I've used Macs, and I use Linux. Windows is always seen as the evil empire, but more than 90% of what I do is done on Windows because it has the software I need. I can see why companies would be loth to commit resources to porting applications to Linux, it is too fragmented in the way it is created and supported. Microsoft and Apple are reliable institutions.

    This comes from quite a while ago, I've snipped the pre-GUI ones, but if OSes were like airlines :

    Mac Airways: The cashiers, flight attendants, and pilots all look the same, talk the same, and act the same. When you ask them questions about the flight, they reply that you don't want to know, don't need to know, and would you please return to your seat and watch the movie.

    Windows Airlines:
    The terminal is neat and clean, the attendants courteous, the pilots capable. The fleet of Lear jets the carrier operates is immense. Your jet takes off without a hitch, pushes above the clouds and, at 20,000 feet, explodes without warning.

    Linux Express:
    Passengers bring a piece of the airplane and a box of tools with them to the airport. They gather on the tarmac, arguing about what kind of plane they want to build. The passengers split into groups and build several different aircraft but give them all the same name. Only some passengers reach their destinations, but all of them believe they arrived.
    Last edited by IlfaGoods; December 6th, 2019 at 06:06 PM. Reason: too much bold

  10. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by epa View Post

    By "Not quite there yet", I mean this: TurfFX is disabled in the Mac version of TRS19. Well, many of the routes I'm building rely heavily on TurfFX grass. Without TurfFX, they'd be empty boards painted one color and, as far as I'm concerned, ruined.

    Matt

    That's one of the main reasons why i'm sticking with TANE , its a waste of time to make anything in 2019 if you are on a MAC. The issue will probably never be fixed, but although I have tried using windows to run Trainz, i just cannot be bothered with all the hassle i have with it that I don't have on the Mac. its not that its insurmountable to fix, i just cant be bothered to waste the time to do so.
    Whoever in Apple made the decision to not support Nvidia cards should be shot at dawn and undergo the digital equivalent to cashiering beforehand.
    WARNING! The Surgeon General has determined that the use of the simulator Trainz is highly addictive,

  11. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by IlfaGoods View Post
    I've used a few OSes in my time, ...
    Very funny. I liked that.

    FWIW, I think I might try OpenSuse because it apparently is supportive of weird people like me who like to write code. When I did my 30 sec Google survey of available Linix distros and popularity, I was amazed at the number of distros.

    "cinnamon on mint"? Sounds like a recipe.

    Paul


  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by pcas1986 View Post
    Very funny. I liked that.

    FWIW, I think I might try OpenSuse because it apparently is supportive of weird people like me who like to write code. When I did my 30 sec Google survey of available Linix distros and popularity, I was amazed at the number of distros.

    "cinnamon on mint"? Sounds like a recipe.
    SuSe was the first version of Linux I used extensively when I had a Linux box. I found that version to be very close to Solaris which I was using a lot of at work during the same time. I think it's a lot more utilitarian and down to business without the fluff found in Ubuntu which tries so hard to be like Windows.

    You can get OpenSuSe, or used to be able to get it, from the Microsoft Store as an add-on that will run directly in Windows 10. It'll run as a separate shell in a console window and will run non-graphical Linux tools, programs and utilities right alongside Windows. In a sense, it's fully virtualized within the Windows operating system.
    John
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  13. #28
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    I started with Slackware, the original one Linus Torvalds created in 1991....... all subsequent distros were much easier!
    Malc


  14. #29
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    I've been using LINUX for years. My IT expertise goes back over 50 years to 1961, when I joined the navy and went to programming school as well as into Naval Intelligence (There's an oxymoron for you). At first, LINUX was real for geeks, and I loved it. Now, LINUX (I use Ubuntu 18.02LTS) has quite a lot of software that, if you were to buy it from Microsoft, you'd pay around $1000US for it. Open office takes care of my writing needs and I used it to write and publish two novels. As for programming, I was devastated when Windows 10 refused to install VB6. However, there is an alternative in LINUX/Ubuntu called Gambas. It's a free implementation of a visual Basic suite and quite powerful and getting better each day. Like Kotangagirl, I love to get hand-me-down computers (usually laptops, but not all) from people who think they're out of date/slow/buggy/whatever and don't want to deal with them. I currently have four laptops running Ubuntu and I usually take one with me when I'm on a trip or whenever I want to write on the road. As several have said, going out in public with LINUX seems to keep most of the viruses and crud out of your system.

    As for the sales figures, you have to take into consideration that you can hardly BUY a computer that doesn't have Windows on it in some form (mostly Win10 nowadays). This tends to skew sales figures badly since you mostly don't have choice in the matter. Even if you plan on installing LINUX from day 1, you still have Win10 to contend with and add to the sales figures. True, you could put one together yourself (I've done it a number of times, including building it from the component-level (AKA Heathkit H-8 and H-89), but fine-tuning is a must and you don't always get it right.

    Funny you should mention Slackware, Malc. My last name is Slack.

    Shameless plug: Look for my author's name of B. Douglas Slack on Amazon for my novels.

    Bill
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  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCitron View Post
    ...
    You can get OpenSuSe, or used to be able to get it, from the Microsoft Store as an add-on that will run directly in Windows 10. It'll run as a separate shell in a console window and will run non-graphical Linux tools, programs and utilities right alongside Windows. In a sense, it's fully virtualized within the Windows operating system.
    I'll want to run Blender, Lazarus Pascal and one or more image editors. Right now I'm trying to figure out where to put it and how to install it. I could run it in VM Workstation but I have a 256GB SSD that has one or more Trainz installations that I could move onto a 1TB Samsung SSD 970 EVO Plus. Maybe I could re-configure as a dual boot which is something I haven't done for a long time.

    I thought I had a spare 2GB HDD then I remembered its in my old PC in a bedroom surrounded by cardboard boxes full of stuff my daughter bought back from the UK.

    Maybe I'll have a look at Gambas which Hiballer just mentioned. Basic was a dirty word when I was at uni in the mid 80's as a mature age student. I was also in the (Oz) Navy at that time and wrote code for Navy systems. Small world!

    Paul


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