.
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 22 of 22

Thread: Bridge Type Help

  1. #16

    Default



    This is what I came up with so far. Next I'll add the fencing. Maybe this won't be as hard as I first thought.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    United States of America, Massachusetts, Haverhill
    Posts
    26,153
     

    Default

    Here is something I found that is similar. I had forgotten to post this before.

    https://goo.gl/maps/96CpnkL7qvFr8hePA

    The bridge its self is incorrect, but the steel structure is similar.

    Sadly this bridge is in poor shape and should be preserved, but that's not going to happen in Lawrence.

    And this one too. This is on the North Canal in Lawrence.

    https://goo.gl/maps/YVZ5XBgCHVgTAYZ56

    The decking might be helpful for you. That is a skewed Warren truss in the background. The connecting tracks are long gone. The whole area, on both sides of the canal, used to be all tracks, and sidings.

    Like the first bridge.

    https://goo.gl/maps/ifgrTH1eua7bY7Yr9
    Last edited by JCitron; November 18th, 2019 at 10:21 PM.
    John
    Trainz User Since: 12-2003
    Trainz User ID: 124863
    T:ANE Build: 94829
    TRS2019/Trainz-PLUS: 105100

  3. #18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JCitron View Post
    Here is something I found that is similar. I had forgotten to post this before.

    https://goo.gl/maps/96CpnkL7qvFr8hePA

    The bridge its self is incorrect, but the steel structure is similar.

    Sadly this bridge is in poor shape and should be preserved, but that's not going to happen in Lawrence.

    And this one too. This is on the North Canal in Lawrence.

    https://goo.gl/maps/YVZ5XBgCHVgTAYZ56

    The decking might be helpful for you. That is a skewed Warren truss in the background. The connecting tracks are long gone. The whole area, on both sides of the canal, used to be all tracks, and sidings.

    Like the first bridge.

    https://goo.gl/maps/ifgrTH1eua7bY7Yr9
    Those look like real old school bridges.

    I do have five beams supporting the deck. From the original picture of the bridge, there doesn't appear to be any mid supports like many other Laurel Line bridges have.
    This is what I have so far. I still need to add some shadowing to the concrete and metal parts.


  4. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    United States of America, Massachusetts, Haverhill
    Posts
    26,153
     

    Default

    That'll work great, I think.

    Those are really old-school bridges I think they date back to the 1850's or 60's at least.
    John
    Trainz User Since: 12-2003
    Trainz User ID: 124863
    T:ANE Build: 94829
    TRS2019/Trainz-PLUS: 105100

  5. #20

    Default

    Here is the finished product. While this bridge is finished, I have 3 more bridges to make. I may be back with more questions.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    U S Del
    Posts
    2,084
    Blog Entries
    1
     

    Default

    Looks great . If I can I will . Routes coming along well .

    Matt
    work hard, Play harder

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    United States of America, Maine
    Posts
    120
     

    Default

    Another path to go searching along about infrastructure of railroads is to look at the documents and maps that were generated by the Valuation Act (1913). Often referred to as "valuation" or "Val" plans these maps are still used today to locate property lines, curvature, signals, culverts, and bridges in respect to each other (and what the railroad wants to do). Most railroads have simply updated the original survey as changes happen, but you may be able to find older copies in archives. Depending on how well records have been preserved in that area you may be able to obtain copies through a state archive or other such repository/agency.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •