.
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Loading a Coal Train - process

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    United States of America, Pennsylvania, Murrysville
    Posts
    3,316
     

    Question Loading a Coal Train - process

    How does the engineer/driver know when to pull forward so the next car can load at a tipple?
    How does he/she move the proper distance to insure the car is fully loaded?

    I noted a comment about how unrealistically fast the coal loading process is. A 20 car consist takes about 12 minutes at an Mgsapper 4 track tipple. The loading method is a drop down trough which is retracted between card. The process is slow and boring but probably approaches reality more then others.
    Dick near Pittsburgh, Pa. i5-2500K 4.3ghz, 8gb memory, GTX1060 4gb video card

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Australia, NSW, Sydney
    Posts
    5,759
    Blog Entries
    3
     

    Default

    Many modern bulk loading systems use a "conveyor belt" system - the train is moved forward continuously at a slow but set speed (like a conveyor belt) through the hopper which is continuously dumping coal. The wagons that are loaded this way often have a "roof" (for want of a better description) over the buffer/coupling gear at each end so that the coal that would fall between two coupled wagons (because of the continuous dumping) is deflected to the sides and away from the couplings, air hoses, etc that could be damaged.

    Trying to stop a train to position each wagon correctly under the loading hopper for loading to commence is not a simple matter, particularly on very long trains. Starting the train again to move the next wagon into position also wastes a lot of fuel. Plus if the wagons are stationary when loaded then the loading is uneven (e.g. higher in the middle) unless you have a complex system of moving hopper chutes. The conveyor belt method is faster.

    Some systems that still rely on the wagons being stationary for loading use a remote loco control system, controlled at the loading point, to move the train forward. A variation of this is to pass the wagons through the hopper coupled in small groups but uncoupled from the locos and a mechanical system is used to move the wagons into position and through the loading chute(s).

    No doubt other methods also exist.
    A member of the "Party Machine". Now if only I could remember where they are holding the party!

  3. #3

    Default

    Most UK bulk coal loading is (or rather was due to the shunning of fossil fuel) is done using slow speed fitted locos which typically run at walking pace or less through the bunker, as Pware says effectively a conveyor belt. However waiting around for 40 minutes or more for that to complete in Trainz is going to get even more boring so some compromise is necessary.

    A similar procedure would apply when unloading at the power station.
    TRS 2019 Coach Class (Former Customer)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    United States of America, Pennsylvania, Murrysville
    Posts
    3,316
     

    Default

    Very nice explanations. Yes, the "boring factor" may be an issue when modeling one of the more modern systems. However. I am running three trains heading to the mine. When one is loading (boring), the other two remain in transit. Bu using the Quick Portal systems scheduling feature I can keep visual activity at the mine with some two-at-a-time trains being loaded. Just scheduling the trains (20 cars each) the fossil fuel industry will possibly give me a plaque.

    I should note that concurrent loading of 2 trains does cause a few empty cars/wagons/hoppers. The power company (destination) may take notice.
    Dick near Pittsburgh, Pa. i5-2500K 4.3ghz, 8gb memory, GTX1060 4gb video card

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    United States of America, California, Port Hueneme
    Posts
    1,738
     

    Default

    Excellent explanation of how to load coal. It seems to me that there are two school of action here: Those that are not patient and those that value correct simulation. So, for those that don't want to wait, just use "instant load" command. For this you don't even have to run the train to the tipple. It will load anywhere, all the cars and not fully stopped (still moving by inertia). Me, for the sake of reality like to see loading at slow pace, even if it takes longer.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    United States of America, Alabama, Birmingham
    Posts
    2,705
     

    Default

    Just as extra info, many real world industries use winches like are shown here to move cars as they are loaded. Empties are pulled one at a time to be loaded and then pulled to the edge of a slight incline where they roll down and couple to the other loaded cars. Small scale operations of course.

    https://www.carpuller.com/winch-rail...r-layouts.html

    Or if large enough they would have a small switcher on site.

    William

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    United States of America, Michagain, Berkley
    Posts
    5,399
    Blog Entries
    6
     

    Default

    I have the load speed used in 1969, 0.4 to 0.8mph.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •