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Thread: The construction of Sydney Harbour Bridge

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    Default The construction of Sydney Harbour Bridge

    John
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    Thanks for that never seen that one
    OH&S would have a field day - ( the how not to do it guide )
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    Quote Originally Posted by big_b View Post
    Thanks for that never seen that one
    OH&S would have a field day - ( the how not to do it guide )
    That's quite an amazing video I agree.

    Definitely scary at times. I felt a bit on edge myself watching the workmen walking along the those open beams as if they were walking on the street.
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCitron View Post
    That's quite an amazing video I agree.

    Definitely scary at times. I felt a bit on edge myself watching the workmen walking along the those open beams as if they were walking on the street.


    Hey John! Yes it was definitely scary for the workers, no safety harnesses, no workplace safety rules and no compensation for injuries in that 'Depression' era. During the 9 years of construction, there were 16 deaths, but only 2 by falling.

    It pays to be alert at all times and sure-footed.

    Cheers,
    Roy

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    Default And it's not an original design!

    And J.J.C. Bradfield designed it after an almost exact copy of another bridge in New York.

    I get the impression that many believe it's an original design.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Red_Rattler View Post
    And J.J.C. Bradfield designed it after an almost exact copy of another bridge in New York.

    I get the impression that many believe it's an original design.
    The New Haven Railroad's Hell Gate Bridge is the one you're thinking of.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hell_Gate_Bridge





    It's not quite as big and impressive as the Sydney Harbor bridge, and only carries trains and not autos and trains on two decks.
    John
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    The Sydney Harbour Bridge goes approx north-south and, when opened in 1932 had, from west to east, two railway tracks, six lanes of road traffic and two tramway tracks.
    When Sydney did away with trams in the 1960's the two tram lines were replaced with road traffic making 8 lanes for cars all on the one level. (John, it is not a two level bridge.)

    Interestingly, Sydney had its first test run of a new light rail route this week from the City to Kensington in the eastern suburbs. It already has another tramway (again called the light rail) which goes from the City to the inner western suburbs. I think there are some assets on the DLS which show the light rail rolling stock and the route.

    The Sydney Suburban Rail service has 8 car electric trains which service the northern suburbs via the bridge. The line drops very quickly on the south side to go underground below York Street in the central city. The older suburban trains with only one drive axle per bogey (the famous Red Rattlers) used to struggle up this slope in the afternoon peak period when full of commuters. I remember many occasions when the wheels were slipping on this hill. On a couple of occasions the train came to a standstill, and struggled away again VERY slowly. I worked in the city and commuted to/from Pymble on the North Shore for many years.
    Last edited by PEV; September 4th, 2019 at 10:50 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PEV View Post
    The Sydney Harbour Bridge goes approx north-south and, when opened in 1932 had, from west to east, two railway tracks, six lanes of road traffic and two tramway tracks.
    When Sydney did away with trams in the 1960's the two tram lines were replaced with road traffic making 8 lanes for cars all on the one level. (John, it is not a two level bridge.)

    Interestingly, Sydney had its first test run of a new light rail route this week from the City to Kensington in the eastern suburbs. It already has another tramway (again called the light rail) which goes from the City to the inner western suburbs. I think there are some assets on the DLS which show the light rail rolling stock and the route.

    The Sydney Suburban Rail service has 8 car electric trains which service the northern suburbs via the bridge. The line drops very quickly on the south side to go underground below York Street in the central city. The older suburban trains with only one drive axle per bogey (the famous Red Rattlers) used to struggle up this slope in the afternoon peak period when full of commuters. I remember many occasions when the wheels were slipping on this hill. On a couple of occasions the train came to a standstill, and struggled away again VERY slowly. I worked in the city and commuted to/from Pymble on the North Shore for many years.
    Wow, thank you Peter for these details.

    It's something how old lines are being restored and the equipment is given a new name. We have a new light rail line going in to Union Square Somerville in Somerville MA and the other branch going to Medford Square in Medford, MA. Both of these lines were torn up in the 1950s. The alignment is a little different, meaning they will make use of the former B&M Lowell line ROW and share that with the commuter trains and a little freight then branch off to their destinations, but essentially the same route is restored.

    I was under the impression it was two levels probably from the commuter trains running on the steep ramps coming up to the surface. It's an interesting setup that must be fascinating to watch from a rail enthusiast's standpoint.
    John
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    John,
    Here is a link to the government web site of the bridge. The cross section drawing illustrates my post above.
    sydney-harbour-bridge

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    Quote Originally Posted by PEV View Post
    John,
    Here is a link to the government web site of the bridge. The cross section drawing illustrates my post above.
    sydney-harbour-bridge
    Thank you, Peter!
    John
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