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Thread: Really Stupid Question - what does a track spline point turning red in TANE mean?

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    Question Really Stupid Question - what does a track spline point turning red in TANE mean?

    I'm fiddling around with TANE for the first time recently, and discovered that the route I'm using could use some trackwork improvements, and that TANE has points and frogs at turnouts. (Does all track do this, or only ones equipped for it? Does TRS2019 have that feature as well?) Trying to make a turnout less sharp, the switch didn't render any points/frogs (no problem with me for that one switch), and the spline point turned red. So... what does a red spline point mean? Does it just mean no points/frogs on this turnout, and everything else is fine, or does it indicate a bigger, not just appearance problem? If it's the former, can I just ignore it, or do I need to fix it to work correctly?

    Thanks, new to TANE+.

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    It normally means it will not be a procedural junction (so the frogs etc will not show) however if the junction is too sharp trains will have problems with it.

    Shane
    Shane Turner
    Technical and DirectX Advisor - Not affiliated with N3V

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    As Shane says, a red spline denotes that the normal procedural turnout will not be implemented. Having said that, what causes this to happen? Several things. First make sure the end splines (where they connect to tracks) are all at the same height. Then, to make sure, do a correct track aligment at ends. last, if you have another turnout in very close proximity to diverging tracks, you'll get reds. There must be a reasonable distance from central frogs to the start of the next turnout. Try, move and experiment and you'll see. So, the great quastion is, how do you make double slips using procedural tracks? if they are tight, at least one of the sides of the double slip will not work as intended. If anybody knows, let's hear it.

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    It means the turnout does not meet the "acceptable" standards for a procedural switch and so it's not possible to create the frog, check rails and movable switch blades.

    Reasons include too sharp a curvature, differences in height (if the switch is on a grade), sometimes even the type of track connected to the switch.

    Try moving things around a bit or perhaps straightening the section of track that leads into the switch. It sometimes helps.

    Phil

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    Quote Originally Posted by llebrez View Post
    First make sure the end splines (where they connect to tracks) are all at the same height.
    The spline points don't have to be at the same height. The vertical plane of the track at each spline point must be the same, but it can be on an angle. The most likely reason for the plane being different at the junction spline points is that the adjacent track spline points are not in the same plane, thereby inducing vertical curvature of the track between the junction spline points.

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