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Thread: Route Merge Tips?

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    United States of America, Massachusetts, Haverhill
    Posts
    24,659

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrakemanJake View Post
    Cheers guys, you never stop learning in the worlds of trains and trainz, fascinating stuff! Most of my routes are UK retro routes from the 50's and 60's, so for anyone who is interested in the same, I would recommend checking out the National Library of Scotland site where you can access 25 inch map overlays from the turn of the century, they even map signal post locations. The amount of laid track back then is absolutely eye watering! I would also like to pass on a tip when building a retro line in Google earth is always take measurements from stuff like canal lock gates, old bridge centres, i.e stuff that has never moved in time barring an earthquake.
    Those are great maps! They don't interest me so much in route building because I'm across from the other side of the Atlantic, but boy I love maps like that!

    When I visited the UK in the mid-1980s, I purchased various maps and guides. Among my purchases is a set of travel guides for the intricate canal system, which predated and competed with the railways. What fascinated me about these books was all the old ordinance maps.

    It is truly sad how much has been removed in many areas including my own. As much as the local towns and developers attempt to remove the traces of the railroads/railways, there is no way to remove them completely. Whenever I look at Google Earth or regular maps in general, I look for those tell tail signs of a ROW. These maybe buildings with an odd shape to them, streets that dead end on either side of an open space, an existing line that curves off sharply instead of going straight on, a line of power poles following a path, and so on. In many cases, I've been spot on when I see those details. If only we could go back in time and see the action as it was back then. With Trainz, however, we can at least bring back the glory of the rail traffic as it was even if it's on the computer.
    John
    Trainz User Since: 12-2003
    Trainz User ID: 124863
    T:ANE Build: 94829
    TRS2019: 98592

  2. #17

    Default Nostalgia!

    Quote Originally Posted by JCitron View Post
    Those are great maps! They don't interest me so much in route building because I'm across from the other side of the Atlantic, but boy I love maps like that!

    When I visited the UK in the mid-1980s, I purchased various maps and guides. Among my purchases is a set of travel guides for the intricate canal system, which predated and competed with the railways. What fascinated me about these books was all the old ordinance maps.

    It is truly sad how much has been removed in many areas including my own. As much as the local towns and developers attempt to remove the traces of the railroads/railways, there is no way to remove them completely. Whenever I look at Google Earth or regular maps in general, I look for those tell tail signs of a ROW. These maybe buildings with an odd shape to them, streets that dead end on either side of an open space, an existing line that curves off sharply instead of going straight on, a line of power poles following a path, and so on. In many cases, I've been spot on when I see those details. If only we could go back in time and see the action as it was back then. With Trainz, however, we can at least bring back the glory of the rail traffic as it was even if it's on the computer.
    I am in total agreement with you. When I see the railway system in my country at the turn of the century, I can only see the blood, sweat and tears that went into building it. Along comes a character like Dr Beeching with his scalpel and decides to remove railway systems that are now being restored where possible by enthusiasts and entrepreneurs into a billion pound industry, irony indeed!
    You are quite right about what you call a row. If you research a now defunked route in the UK, it sits out like a sore thumb in Google earth. The tree rows and cuttings are obvious. I have to confess undoing Dr Beeching's work and the historic geographical research and pouring over maps is the juice for me in Trainz. I'm not driver material, I would rather walk along my route to see if it looks authentic or not.
    I discovered a statistic that really bothered me during research, for every mile of track laid in the UK, three railway navigators died. More railway workers died than British soldiers in WW1! A sobering thought when building a route.

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