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Thread: AI is coming to real trains (but I hope that it is not Alister)

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by pware View Post
    Just heard the tragic news about the first pedestrian to be killed by an AI controlled car (an Uber) in Arizona. The pedestrian was apparently walking her bike across a 4 lane road at night and not at an authorised crossing when she was struck. She later died of her injuries in hospital.

    As many have predicted, this incident brings up the issue of culpability. Is the software, the car manufacturer or the "passenger" responsible for the safe operation of the vehicle?
    Well it now appears that the passenger in a driverless vehicle will be held responsible for any deaths or injuries that are caused by the vehicle. In an official report just released on the above fatal collision, the passenger, who was watching a streamed episode of "The Voice" at the time of the collision, may be charged with vehicular manslaughter. If she had not been distracted than she would have been able to safely stop the vehicle in time to avoid the collision, according to the report.

    Uber have also announced that it is "absolutely prohibited" for passengers to be using their phones or mobile devices while riding in one of their driverless cars.
    A member of the "Party Machine". Now if only I could remember where they are holding the party!

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by pware View Post
    ................................

    Uber have also announced that it is "absolutely prohibited" for passengers to be using their phones or mobile devices while riding in one of their driverless cars.
    That will be difficult to enforce, I think. It's proving impossible to stop people using their devices while actually driving, so are they going to stop using them when they are just sitting there, not driving?

    Just my two bitcoins worth,

    Mick

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mick_Berg View Post
    That will be difficult to enforce, I think. It's proving impossible to stop people using their devices while actually driving, so are they going to stop using them when they are just sitting there, not driving?
    I suspect that it is more to cover their own backsides if a passenger has an accident while using a mobile device. They can point to the "conditions of use" and the blame will most likely fall upon the passenger.
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  4. #19
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    Personally I think it would not be doable for freight trains. Passenger yes because that is 1 schedule with 1 preset consist which does not change. Freight on the other hand varies from day to day and the AI would also need to know what cars go where and where the consumer wants them to go. Kind of a lot to ask from AI in my opinion. Remotely operated locos are fine in my opinion. It allows 1 guy to operate it without needing a conductor although they still have one. They are extremely useful in yards and such but I can't see them being put into any kind of mailine services.
    Why am I the one that always find bugs??? TRS19 early access coming very soon. Also volunteer on the Colebrookdale Railroad.

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by MTH_ELECTRIC_TRAINS View Post
    They are extremely useful in yards and such but I can't see them being put into any kind of mailine services.
    Remotely controlled mainline freight trains, actually ore trains with hundreds of ore wagons, are already operating in the Pilbera region of North Western Australia with the journey between mine and port about 275km (170mi). The trains are controlled from the city of Perth, about 2,000km further south. This region also holds the world record for the longest train - 682 fully loaded ore wagons and 8 locos with gross weight of almost 100,000 tonnes (metric) and a length of just over 7.3 kms.

    While AI controlled freight trains are not yet a reality, it is in isolated and remote operations such the ore lines in the Pilbera, that they are most likely to make their appearance. There are no pedestrians and no towns, very few road crossings, just the odd kangaroo.
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  6. #21
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    The very first remotely controlled ("robotic") freight train has just delivered a load of 28,000 tonnes of iron ore a distance of 280km from the mine to the port in the remote Pilbara region of NW Australia. The "driver" was located in the city of Perth, about 2,000km south. The delivery was the first full scale test run for the $AU940 million AutoHaul system which is expected to be in full operation by the end of this year.
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