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Thread: Ransom Attack. Microsoft Blames Everybody But Themselves.

  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by wholbr View Post
    Hi everybody.
    In response to John Whellans posting at #52 of this thread, then Chromebooks and Chromebase desktops are similarly equipped to PC laptops and desktops in regard to users with disabilities finding enhanced features for their use incorporated into those devices.

    In regard to my own company and others having somewhat “simplistic” requirements and therefore Google Chrome OS is easily found suitable to our needs, I can visualise how that perception can come about. However, all business requirements are different and in my company's circumstances we are what I would class at present as a medium size operation with 26 employees (both full and part-time​) based around fourteen workstations in the main open office and four workstations based in individual offices.

    The above I would suggest would be pro-typical of many medium size company office setups along with the need for those workstations to share files and work collaboratively on documents. In the foregoing many of those documents are internally and externally security sensitive and therefore not open to view by all members of staff and no one outside the company with the exception of the company's clients on a need to know basis.


    Bill
    Trouble is with a simplistic set of requirements you eventually hit limits. Exchanging documents with an organisation that employs partially sighted people for example or even one that makes use of Microsoft Visual Basic in Word. You could go for ISO standard documents good heavens you mean Microsoft is one of the few companies whose wordprocessing meets an ISO standard rather than a propitiatory format.

    and standards help on the interoperability side as well and I'd prefer not to get into a deep discussion about ISO standards or the work that goes into them having beet part of the process once.

    Cheerio John

  2. #62
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    The part of this that I don't understand is that it is stated that Microsoft has been putting out lots of patches of late. Isn't that a good thing? Doesn't that mean they are trying to stay ahead of the latest or next threat to their customers computer systems? If a company chooses to not staff it's IT dept well enough to evaluate updates and get them integrated into the system how can that possibly be Microsoft's problem?
    Member since January 12 2001

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikeman View Post
    The part of this that I don't understand is that it is stated that Microsoft has been putting out lots of patches of late. Isn't that a good thing? Doesn't that mean they are trying to stay ahead of the latest or next threat to their customers computer systems? If a company chooses to not staff it's IT dept well enough to evaluate updates and get them integrated into the system how can that possibly be Microsoft's problem?

    It's just easier for some to say its Microsoft's fault than to try to understand the problem.

    Cheerio John

  4. #64
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    I agree with John Whelan on this.

    Using a common automobile manufacturer as an example which has more than it's share of recalls, recalls are dispatched to various owners with details and instructions to bring their automobiles in for the retrofitting. The manufacturer did the part they were supposed to do, whether the automobile was still in warranty or not, and now it's up to the car owner to do his or her part. If the car owner doesn't follow up on the recall, we'll the onus is now on them; not the car manufacturer. Sure we can blame the automaker for the initial problem, just as we can say it's Microsoft's problem initially, but Microsoft just like the automaker in my example, has done their part. They can't hold everyone's hand to ensure things are updated. People complain enough about Microsoft, or some other software company intruding in on their computers. Imagine Microsoft forcing an update even when people have updates turned off. That ain't gonna happen anytime soon!

    Unfortunately there are people such as my sister who said this to me. "Oh I never do the Windows updates because they take too long". Her machine was more than a year behind the updates, which took about 8 hours to install with reboots!

    It's people such as her, which are ripe for attack, and I'm sure there are many of them out there. Their unpatched machines, which are usually full of malware to begin with, are open and ready for compromise if they haven't been already. With her machine, I had to remove nearly 5,000 malware items first, and no this wasn't cookies, before I could do any kind of updates. Given the slow nature of this cheap laptop to begin with, I was quite surprised it even boot up which it did. The updating process plus the malware removal took over 14 hours. I know for sure it would have been easier to refresh the machine, but without the discs, and no way to make image discs because the software would barely load, I felt it was easier to clean the machine manually.
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  5. #65
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    Don't click on links in emails, Subscribe to CERT here; https://www.us-cert.gov/ncas/alerts/TA17-132A

    99% of all this can be avoided with education...
    If it's not broke, don't fix it.

  6. #66
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    @Bill, you seem like a fairly tech savvy guy, what are your (or anyone elses) opinions to only using the builtin windows 10 defence and antivirus. I've been told is as good as anything else and touch wood havn't had any issues thus far.

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by scratchy View Post
    @Bill, you seem like a fairly tech savvy guy, what are your (or anyone elses) opinions to only using the builtin windows 10 defence and antivirus. I've been told is as good as anything else and touch wood havn't had any issues thus far.
    I've had excellent luck with it as well, Scratchy. I've run other programs separately, just in case, and they found nothing so in my opinion it seems to work fine.
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    Quote Originally Posted by scratchy View Post
    @Bill, you seem like a fairly tech savvy guy, what are your (or anyone elses) opinions to only using the builtin windows 10 defence and antivirus. I've been told is as good as anything else and touch wood havn't had any issues thus far.
    So long as you use "Brain" with Windows defender you should be fine.
    Malc


  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by scratchy View Post
    @Bill, you seem like a fairly tech savvy guy, what are your (or anyone elses) opinions to only using the builtin windows 10 defence and antivirus. I've been told is as good as anything else and touch wood havn't had any issues thus far.
    The most important part is making sure windows does its updates. I use the windows built in tools and have for some years. Protect yourself by backing up the hard drive win 7 back up included in win 10 works fine, you'll need a system image and a recovery DVD as well that protects against encryption malware. It's probably worthwhile putting a decent firewall between your devices and the Internet. Recently a machine was compromised by the printer and router being taken over, after that everything was channelled through a virtual network not fun. An Asus RT-N66U or something similar would be ideal protection.

    Cheerio John

  10. #70
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    Hi scratchy and everybody.
    Quote Originally Posted by scratchy View Post
    @Bill, you seem like a fairly tech savvy guy, what are your (or anyone elses) opinions to only using the builtin windows 10 defence and antivirus. I've been told is as good as anything else and touch wood havn't had any issues thus far.
    Scratchy, I would very much go along with the recommendation's​ in regard to the various antivirus programmes​ and security measures that forum members have put forward in the above posts. I can also well understand that when any person pays a very substantial sum of money for a PC gaming system, then keeping that system safe from attack becomes a very high priority. However it has to be recognised, even with the very best security programs there is always the chance that an attack will overcome that program and infect your system. The forgoing is based on the fact that any PC security system is reactive rather than proactive, meaning that a threat has to appear before it can be protected against.

    In the above, a user can rely on the recommended antivirus protection put forward in the above posts or use an alternative operating system for everyday computer use such as emails, casual surfing of the web or watching videos etc while keeping that expensive PC system exclusively for it's gaming purpose.

    In the earlier pages of this thread it can be seen that my company and myself have since two thousand and thirteen put great faith in the one hundred percent cloud based system known as Google OS (not to be confused with Google Android). The foregoing system was brought forward in two thousand and eleven and since that time no one has managed to hack the OS in any way. The above is not to say that that a successful attack will never be carried out on Google OS but at this point in time and without doubt it is certainly the most secure system on the market.

    Google OS operates in the main for personal users by way of laptops known as Chromebooks which link into Google cloud servers which monitor and continually security check all files passing to and from devices linked into the system. Chromebooks are relatively low cost to purchase with between one hundred and fifty and two hundred dollars enabling anyone to take ownership of a basic Chromebook.

    The above I realise is not the cheapest means of protecting a gaming PC. However, with the total cost of a top of the range gaming PC system perhaps running well beyond two thousand dollars at present, the cost of a Chromebook can be viewed as insurance on the the high cost PC system. I have been reading that since the "Wanna Cry" attack that done such damage a few weeks ago many retailers are reporting that Chromebook and Chromebase desktop sales have increased by over 65% worldwide.

    Just my thoughts,but hope this helps
    Bill
    Posted by way of voice dictation on Acer R13 Chromebook.
    Last edited by wholbr; June 18th, 2017 at 04:34 PM. Reason: text error

  11. #71

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    Voice dictation, hey?

    Will the day ever come when we operate locomotives in Trainz using voice dictation? You know, something like this:

    Orright, Alastair, hit the injector five times, turn the blower on, spin the reverser to 75% and give yourself 20% steam on the throttle
    Speak the truth, follow right conduct; all else will fall into place.

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