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Thread: North East England - Steam Days Screenshots - Large Screenshots Possible

  1. #31
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    Default Hoppers hoppers everywhere

    Hi Saieditor, thanks for that. The NER encouraged colliery owners to use railway owned wagons and maintained rates over many years to keep them happy. The company adopted hopper type wagons as an efficiency measure as vast quantities of coal mined in County Durham made its way to coal staithes on the River Tyne (Derwenthaugh, Dunston, Hebburn, Tyne Dock), the River Wear (Pallion) and Seaham for loading by gravity on to ships. Domestic coal depots were also often gravity drop staithes, to discourage depots holding on to wagons while they were shovelled out for weighing, bagging and delivery. The company had thousands of 4-wheel wooden coal hoppers with 10.5 Ton, 11 Ton, 12 Ton, 15 Ton, 20 Ton and 21 Ton capacities (the extra ton on the diagram P8 eight-plank due to anti-friction gear - removed by 1923). They also had a 40 Ton steel bogie hopper type dedicated for trains running between Ashington and the staithes at Blyth.

  2. #32
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    Default Lunchtime at Reedsmouth Junction on the Border Counties Railway

    Northeast England during the steam era. In the roaring twenties on the Border Counties Railway, LNER Class D21 (formerly NER R1 Class) brings the 10:50 a.m. Newcastle to Hawick passenger train in to Reedsmouth Junction station at 12:25 p.m. The 42 mile Anglo-Scottish BCR ran between Border Counties Junction west of Hexham and Riccarton Junction on the Waverley route and was built by the North British Railway. Reedsmouth is where the former NBR Wansbeck branch from Morpeth joins the BCR. A J21 0-6-0 shunts vans in the exchange sidings while a J24 0-6-0 stands with its goods train from Hawick waiting for the token to proceed southwards on its way to Blaydon yard. This is a small personal layout inspired by a Railway Modeller article about the station. I doubt that Reedsmouth was as busy as this on a regular basis. Passenger trains on the BCR were infrequent. Bradshaws for 1922 shows Reedsmouth with three trains each way daily, at 7:46 a.m. 12:29 p.m. and 5:55 p.m ex-Newcastle and 7:44 a.m. 11:04 a.m. and 5:51 p.m ex-Riccarton. There was also a train from Reedsmouth to Bellingham at 3:41 p.m. returning at 4:09 p.m for school children. This ran onwards to Scots Gap on the Wansbeck branch. The "Wanny" had three trains daily, with a fourth on Tuesdays only between Reedsmouth and Scots Gap (6:05 p.m departure, returning at 7:18). On the Wansbeck branch a single bogie brake third usually sufficed to meet passenger demand.



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    Last edited by borderreiver; July 16th, 2017 at 07:35 PM.

  3. #33
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    Default The morning "rush hour" at Reedsmouth Junction in the late 1920s

    Northeast England during the steam era. Some more shots of Reedsmouth Junction. At 7:53 a.m. a J21 0-6-0 waits with the single coach 8 a.m. Wansbeck branch train to Scots Gap while a D20 4-4-0 and D23 4-4-0 pass in the station loop to exchange block tokens. The D20 in green is hauling the 6:00 a.m. from Hawick to Newcastle while the D23 in black is hauling the 6:10 a.m. from Newcastle to Riccarton Junction on the Waverley route. I have also included a fireman's eye view from the D23 of the approach to Reedsmouth station. The D23 has a rake of 45 ft ex-NER clerestory roof coaches. A Third Class, a Lavatory Composite and a 3 compartment Brake Third. The D20 has a rake of 52 ft ex-NER clerestory coaches. A Third Class, a Lavatory Composite and a Lavatory Brake Composite.





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  4. #34
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    Default

    *Post Deleted: Thought it wouldn't be appropriate.*

    Anyway, I see the route is coming along very well.
    Last edited by hholdenaz; April 29th, 2016 at 07:26 PM.

  5. #35
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    Default Troop train for Woodburn crossing the North Tyne

    Northeast England during the steam era. A rural scene on the Border Counties railway during the mid-1950s as BR 3MT 2-6-0 77003 crosses the bridge over the River rede, a tributary of the North Tyne while approaching Reedsmouth. The 3MT is hauling a troop train of ex-LNER Gresley coaches from Glasgow bound for Woodburn on the Wansbeck line. Military traffic was coming and going from Woodburn right up until the Wansbeck line closed in the early 1960s. This is a small personal layout inspired by a Railway Modeller article about the station.



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    Last edited by borderreiver; July 16th, 2017 at 07:41 PM.

  6. #36
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    Default Evening through goods at Reedsmouth

    Northeast England during the steam era. Here in the spring of 1946 an LNER K3 2-6-0 gets away from Reedsmouth bound for Hawick with the evening partially fitted through goods train from Blaydon yard. The trains on the Border Counties Railway in to Scotland were not especially long but there was a flow of traffic between the Scottish borders and Tyneside sufficient to justify at least one train each way daily. During pre-grouping NBR days and the post-grouping LNER era the line was often open through the night to permit goods trains to run over the line. From what I have read, Reedsmouth was the only two-platform station on the BCR, so it was the only loop where scheduled passenger trains would cross. The other loops were at Wall (2 1/4 mi), Wark (10 1/4 mi), Bellingham (16 mi), Falstone (24 mi), Plashetts (29 1/2 mi) and Kielder Forest (32 3/4 mi). During 1925 Plashetts signal box closed but an intermediate token instrument was kept in place, which meant two trains heading in the same direction could occupy the two sections between Falstone and Kielder Forest. There originally appear to have been seven token sections.



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  7. #37
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    Default Q7 0-8-0 hard at work on the Tyne Dock to Consett ore trains circa 1955

    Northeast England during the steam era. In 1954 BR introduced 56 Ton bogie iron ore hoppers using compressed air to operate the hopper doors. Five Q7 0-8-0s and five O1 2-8-0s were fitted with westinghouse pumps to work these trains, which were vacuum braked. Two rakes of four bogie hoppers made up one trainload. Here, Q7 63460 tackles the bank through Stanley and passes West Stanley Junction, with an ex-WD 2-8-0 banking the train. During the late 1950s BR Standard 9F 2-10-0s would arrive to opeate the ore trains. This is my personal route NW Durham and is a work in progress.





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  8. #38
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    Default The Tyne Dock to Consett Iron Ore trains at the end of the 1950s

    Northeast England during the steam era. Here circa 1959 at near Stanley in County Durham a BR Standard 9F 2-10-0 No. 92060 hauls a rake of nine 56 Ton iron ore bogie hoppers up the bank to West Stanley Junction and Annfield Plain on its way to Consett Iron Company. A Raven Q7 0-8-0 is banking on the rear. Banking was necessary between South Pelaw Junction and South Medomsley Junction near Leadgate.



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  9. #39
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    Default The Tyne Dock to Consett iron ore train passing West Stanley Junction

    Northeast England during the steam era. Here circa 1959 the Tyne Dock to Consett iron ore train in the hands of BR 9F 2-10-0 No. 92060 and Q7 0-8-0 No. 63473 are viewed from West Stanley Junction Signal Box. They are passing Q6 0-8-0 standing with a loaded coal train from the National Coal Board exchange sidings at Oxhill. The westinghouse pumps are visible on the 9F. These had been carried by the Q7 0-8-0s and O1 2-8-0s which had been the first locos to haul the 56 Ton hoppers. They were needed to provide compressed air to keep the hopper doors clamped closed in transit and to open them for discharge at the unloading gantry. These pumps would pass to the Type 2 Sulzer diesels (BR Class 24) which would take over in the middle of the 1960s. The second shot shows Q7 No. 63473 at the rear of the train as it passes Q6 No. 63346.





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  10. #40
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    Default No rest for the wicked

    Northeast England during the steam era. Here is a shot circa 1959 depicting a hard-working 9F 2-10-0 approaching West Stanley Junction with nine 56 Ton iron ore hoppers. The firemen on both the 9F and the Q7 would have to work furiously to feed the fire on the climb between South Pelaw Junction and South Medomsley Junction, which could be as steep as 1 in 37 with a ruling grade of around 1 in 50. The NER built two deviation lines in 1892 (at Annfield Plain) and in 1896 (South Pelaw to West Stanley Junction via Beamish). They were necessary to bypass the bottlenecks created by the inclines on the 1834 Stanhope & Tyne line. They were the two Loud Bank inclines near Annfield Plain, along with the East Stanley and Waldridge inclines near Pelton. The Q6, No. 63346 is at the head of a loaded coal train from the NCB exchange sidings at Oxhill. This was the outlet for Morrison Colliery, which would remain open until the mid 1970s.



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  11. #41
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    Default Excursion times at Reedsmouth

    Northeast England during the steam era. Here on my Reedsmouth layout is depicted a late 1920s excursion train from Tyneside to the Scottish borders leaving Reedsmouth on a northbound service. Maybe it is a church outing to Melrose to see the Abbey. Two former TW Worsdell NER C Class 0-6-0s, classed as J21 by the LNER are hauling a rake of 52 ft ex-NER ordinary clerestory roof coaches built around 1900. The presence of a Lavatory Van Composite with two First Class compartments would have been an unexpected spot of luxury. Both J21s, No 1075 and 147 are superheated with the longer smokebox and have Westinghouse brake for passenger and fitted goods work. No. 1075 has the new economy-measure unlined black livery with cabside number while sister No. 147 still retains both the lined red black livery and the numbered tender originally applied post-grouping.





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    Last edited by borderreiver; July 17th, 2017 at 04:09 AM.

  12. #42
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    Default Sentinel Steam railcar on trial run on the Wansbeck line

    Northeast England during the steam era. Here on my Reedsmouth layout is depicted the Wansbeck branch line approach to the station. An LNER diagram 97 Sentinel Steam Railcar, No. 2261 "Diligence" is on a trial run from Morpeth, calling at Scots Gap and Woodburn en-route. Also included is a cab view of the station approach showing the 45ft turntable, the Wickham permanent way trolley and behind it Reedsmouth's grounded coach body, which was used as a store. The station building was a large water tank with the station office on the lower floor. The LNER never actually used either the Sentinel or Clayton steam railcars on the Wansbeck or Border Counties lines. On the Wansbeck branch the single brake third coach with three compartments providing thirty seats was adequate for most weekday trains but it was probably too expensive to provide a new railcar with around twice that seating capacity on a service which only ran three or four return journeys daily.





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    Last edited by borderreiver; July 17th, 2017 at 04:14 AM.

  13. #43
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    Default The "Yorkshire" at work in Northumberland

    Northeast England during the steam era. On my Reedsmouth layout, depicting the late 1920s LNER D49 4-4-0 No. 234 "Yorkshire" has a trailing load of four Gresley bogie gangway teak coaches for a service between Hawick and Newcastle via the Border Counties Railway. In screenshot 1, heading south out of Reedsmouth, "Yorkshire" passes J24 0-6-0 No. 1854 standing on the yard headshunt. In screenshot 2 the 4-4-0 approaches Countess Park with the River North tyne and Reedsmouth in the background.





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  14. #44
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    Default Waiting to cross the ECML at Darlington circa 1920

    Northeast England during the steam era. Here is a depiction of Darlington around 1920 at the Stockton & Darlington crossing, where the original S&D line was crossed by the East Coast Main Line. One of TW Worsdell's C Class 0-6-0s No. 1564 on an iron ore train waits for signals. The train consists of diagram S3 30 Ton steel hoppers fitted with antifriction gear (the discs visible over the axle boxes). This gear was removed from the 30 Ton iron ore hoppers and 21T diagram P8 wooden coal hoppers by the grouping due to coal dust and ore dust fouling the gear, leading to heavy maintenance costs. The C Class (LNER J21) is superheated with the longer smokebox and fitted with westinghouse brake. The diagram S3 hoppers were fitted so higher speeds could be attained hauling loaded ore trains from the cleveland hills to Whitehaven via the Stainmore line through Barnard Castle and Kirby Stephen. The iron viaducts such as Belah on the Stainmore line had weight restrictions, excluding locomotives such as the S2 and S3 4-6-0 classes. A raven Z Class 4-4-2 Atlantic (LNER C7) heads south on the main line, overtaking a Raven S2 4-6-0 (LNER B15) on a fitted van train, while an E1 Class 0-6-0T (LNER J72) stands in the sidings. This is the County Durham section of the TS12 built-in route Kings Cross to Newcastle. I have rolled back this section to the steam era for my personal use.



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  15. #45
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    Default

    Great shots all.

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