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Thread: North East England - Steam Days Screenshots - Large Screenshots Possible

  1. #841
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    Default

    This really is a crazy situation Frank. It seems that SP2 is an unfinished, buggy and unstable piece of software if it can't reliably determine from one day to the next if an asset and its dependencies are faulty or not.
    Narcolepsy is not napping.



  2. #842
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    Default 1920 ECML - Coal for Northallerton

    Northeast England during the steam era. N.E.R. Worsdell P3 Class 0-6-0 Number 2238 continues its journey from Croft yard to Northallerton along the ECML with coal for the large coal depot located near the station.




    Passing the southern end of the water troughs.




    Passing beneath the road overbridge, the slow lines slewing either side to pass through the brick arches.




    Approaching the Zetland overbridge to the north of Castle Hills Junction.




    Coming off the slow lines at Castle Hills Junction and joining the double track section to Northallerton station.




    Passing Castle Hills Junction Signal Box.











  3. #843
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    Default 1914 - NER 10 Ton Perishables vans

    North East England during the steam era. My latest commission from Paul is the North Eastern Railway Diagram F9 10 Ton Fitted Perishables Van. Around 245 were built between 1909 and 1911 and as late as 1947 around 129 remained in NE Area stock. A further 18 F9s remained in use as Refrigerated Vans (out of 23 converted some time before WWII) with another 5 remaining in use as Insulated Vans (out of another 23 so converted prior to WWII). In 1945 8 had been allocated to Fish Traffic (from a photograph in Tatlow's Volume 2B on LNER Wagons at least 1 was taken from the Insulated Van conversions).




    The 290 Class 0-6-0T is shunting two F9s some time before WWI. The van closest to the engine is in the post-1911 livery of Indian Red while the van furthest from the engine is in the Crimson Lake livery applicable to new vans outshopped between 1906 and 1911. Given that vans were shopped at much greater intervals than carriages old liveries could persist for some time and periods of a decade between repaints were not unknown. Wagons and Vans in pre-grouping livery were still seen (though in small numbers) as late as the mid-1930s.

  4. #844
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    Default 1942 - The N.E.R. 10 Ton Perishables Van Diagram F9

    A generation further on and the F9s in LNER Red Oxide livery are in the hands of a J71 0-6-0T.




    The van closest to the engine is in the post-1937 livery with small NE lettering. The van furthest from the engine is in the pre-1937 version with large NE lettering.

    In the background a Steel bodied 20 Ton Coal Hopper to Diagram 100 (Metro-Cammel pattern) stands on the coal staithes. The other pattern 20 Ton Diagram 100 I have is the Hurst-Nelson one, which differs in details from the Met-Cam one.

  5. #845
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    Default 1920 - ECML - Down Express Goods at Low Wiske Troughs

    North East England during the steam era. A N.E.R. S2 Class 4-6-0 is in charge of a down fully ATB fitted express goods working between York and Newcastle Forth Banks. The S2 is not taking water at the Low Wiske water troughs since it has watered at York and is only going as far as Newcastle before proceeding to Gateshead shed for servicing. It will likely be returning to York with another express goods later in the morning.




    The N.E.R. under Wilson Worsdell introduced 4-6-0 locos in the company during 1899 with the ten S Class (B13) engines. However, they were not as free running as expected on the principal passenger expresses and they were quickly cascaded to lesser services with the arrival of the S1 Class (B14). Thirty more S Class were built between 1905 and 1909 to haul the newly introduced express goods services. For twenty years after the introduction of the S Class Worsdell returned to the 4-6-0 arrangement with the S1 Class (1900) while Raven turned out the S2 Class (1911) and S3 Class (1919). The S1 did not take the ECML top slot from the R Class 4-4-0s in 1900 and neither the S2 nor S3 displaced the company's V, V-09 and Z Class Atlantics from the premier express passenger services. Despite this, each class did a great deal of work on secondary passenger expresses and express goods services.

    Last edited by borderreiver; January 1st, 2021 at 05:36 AM.

  6. #846
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    Default 1921 - Weathered F9 vans at Blackhill N.E.R.

    Northeast England during the steam era. Blackhill County Durham and two F9 perishables vans are being shunted by a 290 Class 0-6-0T.




    The locomotive is a 290 Class 0-6-0T, a rebuild from redundant Fletcher era 0-4-4T BTP (Bogie Tank Passenger) engines. The introduction of Wilson Worsdell's O Class 0-4-4T rendered the BTP surplus to requirements. The N.E.R. loathed wasting engines and while some found new work powering steam autocar formations others were rebuilt to fill a need for 0-6-0Ts without resorting to new building. Several of the 290 Class survived in to British Railways days.

    The wagons are N.E.R. 10 Ton Perishables to diagram F9. I have been reskinning them since I am often experimenting to get a different finish. There are two weathered versions. The Crimson Lake version which was applied for around five years prior to 1911 and the Indian Red version applied from 1911. It is entirely plausible for both to be seen in 1921 since wagons were sent to works at much longer intervals compared to passenger carriages. Post-grouping some wagons and vans could still be seen carrying their pre-group liveries as late as the mid-1930s.


  7. #847
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    Default More Shunting at Blackhill

    More shunting at Blackhill.






  8. #848
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    Default 1914 - ECML Between Hett Crossing and Croxdale

    Northeast England during the steam era. Some trains running along the ECML between Hett Crossing and Croxdale in County Durham circa 1914. The trees follow a rather steeply sided burn, which falls from higher ground in this vicinity to join the River Wear to the south of Durham City.




    A Worsdell O Class 0-4-4T heads north on the down line bound for Durham and Newcastle with a local passenger train.




    A Worsdell R1 Class 4-4-0 heads south on the up line bound for York and London Kings Cross with an ECJS express passenger train.

  9. #849
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    Default 1950 Shildon Yard

    Shildon Yard, near Bishop Auckland is on the 1825 Stockton to Darlington route. Built to handle coal, the neighbourhood had, by 1950, been handling coal traffic for 125 years.




    A Q6 brings in a load of empty hoppers.




    Am A4 with a diverted ECML express passenger train runs past the Q6 in Shildon yard.

  10. #850
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    Default 1946 - Shunting Coal at Blackhill on the Derwent Valley Branch

    Northeast England during the steam era. A grimy J72 0-6-0T delivers loaded coal hoppers to the coal merchants at Blackhill, County Durham. This traffic would survive the closure of the branch between Blackhill and the junctions with the Derwenthaugh and Newcastle to Carlisle lines, only ceasing around the time of the closure of Consett steelworks. After the mid-1950s the single line from Consett Low Yard remained to deliver coal to the coal merchants at Blackhill, despite there also being coal merchants at Consett station. The steep banks between Blackhill and Consett may have had something to do with the Blackhill merchants retaining business in their district.




    The steel hoppers are diagram 100 built from 1936 onwards by several contractors on behalf of the LNER. I had Paul Mace build me examples by Metro-Cammell and examples by Hurst-Nielson. I have been busy experimenting with weathering reskinning. These hoppers were rather long-lived, with many lasting in traffic through in to the 1970s before being rebodied by BR. They then lasted in to the mid-1980s. Others had been sold out of BR service to the NCB, where they could be seen in to the mid-1980s at sites such as Westoe Colliery, South Hetton Colliery and Derwenthaugh Coke Works.

    While the LNER introduced their grey small NE livery during 1938 wagons carrying the older style persisted in use for some time before being repainted. The steel shortage between 1940 and 1943 meant that production of the diagram 100 was suspended, with the LNER actually turning to production of the 40-year old diagram P6 and P7 wooden hoppers. Many of those were turned out unpainted, with merely a black rectangle each side for chalked instructions. Although not well documented, some of those may have used second-hand wheelsets from scrapped or bomb-damaged wagons.
    Last edited by borderreiver; January 14th, 2021 at 08:57 AM. Reason: more to say

  11. #851
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    Default 1949 - Shildon - Mixed Rake of Coal Hoppers and a Q5

    Northeast England during the steam era. The LNER Q6 (NER T2 Class) 0-8-0 is closely associated with coal traffic in County Durham, right up to the end of steam in the area during 1967. However, they were not the first attempt by the NER of producing an eight-coupled tender engine to deal with growing train weights. At the start of the 20th century Wilson Worsdell produced his T and T1 Class, both of which bcame LNER Class Q5 (with no part designation). The first ten, built in 1901 as T Class had piston valves, which were "new technology" at the time, while the following batch of ten built during 1902 had slide valves, becoming T1 Class. Thirty more T Class followed during 1903-04 while the final batches, amounting to forty engines were turned out as T1 Class between 1907 and 1911. All fifty T1 slide valve engines worked for the Railway Operating Department (ROD) in France during WWI.

    Q5s had a long association with Shildon. During the 1920s, while there were ten electric locomotives working the electrified Simpasture branch between Shildon and Newport there were no less than forty-four Q5s allocated to the ends of the line. They would bring in the coal to Shildon Yard and distribute it onwards from Newport Yard.




    The forty-seven year-old veteran gets under way from Shildon Yard. the train is a mix of P6 and P7 wooden bodied hopper, with most of the train made up of Diagram 100 and Diagram 167 steel bodied hoppers.




    Approaching Simpasture Junction signal box, a Q6 comes off the Simpasture branch and joins the Bishop Auckland & Weardale line in order to reach the down sidings at Shildon.




    After passing the signal box, the Q5 passes the brake van at the end of the Shildon bound train of empties.




    Plain track to the east of Shildon. The line nearest the camera is a long refuge siding. Then come the double tracks of the Darlington to Bishop Auckland line, with the double tracks of the Simpasture branch furthest from the camera. The only junction between them is at Simpasture Junction.




    Side elevation view.


















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