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Thread: North East England - Steam Days Screenshots - Large Screenshots Possible

  1. #241
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    Now that is a tease, where does one find the NER Mechanical Engineer's saloon to go with the Aerolite?
    JackDownUnder

  2. #242
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    Sorry I do not seem to be able to post an image, think I have forgot how.
    https://db.tt/PM3CkmT69G
    https://db.tt/V63N5Ag9js
    https://db.tt/YkgC9T3gIB
    https://db.tt/cYpPOlBW0M
    https://db.tt/TKWmvoNiQK
    The above are a few images from Yorkshire North
    "The North Eastern Railway Company (NER)
    · Formed on 31 July 1854 by a merger of principally 3 other railway companies: the York Newcastle and Berwick Railway (formed in 1847); the York and North Midland Railway (formed in 1836); the Leeds Northern Railway (renamed from Leeds and Thirsk, itself formed in 1845). The first two of these companies had already been built up by a number of take-overs and mergers.
    · In due course the NER absorbed many other railways in the North East of England, until it had a virtual monopoly of railway transport covering a geographical area from the Humber in the south, to Leeds in the west, to Carlisle from Newcastle, to Berwick in the north. It was almost unique in having such a geographical dominance at this time as most other areas of England had multiple competing railway companies.
    · Major companies absorbed by the NER included, the pioneering Stockton and Darlington Railway (formed in 1821), absorbed by the NER in 1863. Newcastle and Carlisle Railway (formed in 1829), absorbed by the NER in 1862. Blyth and Tyne Railway (formed 1852), absorbed by the NER in 1874. Hull and Barnsley and West Riding Junction (formed in 1880), absorbed by the NER in 1922.
    · The NER included some of the earliest examples in the world of what are now recognised as railway lines. Their commercial success was a large factor in why so many other railway companies were formed and lines built. In the 19th century the UK’s railways were a major reason for the UK’s world dominance in many industrial activities (eg shipbuilding), and a huge part of it’s national life changing people’s lifestyles and habits (eg commuting to work, holidays by the seaside). Many of the practices developed by the NER, and it’s constituent companies, became adopted by other railways.
    · In the years leading up to the Grouping the NER was one of the largest railway companies in the UK, and indeed one of the largest companies in the UK. At Grouping it owned 1800 route miles of track, over 2,000 locomotives (including 13 electric), over 4,000 coaching stock vehicles (mainly passenger carriages), and 124,000 wagons. It’s services supported about 60 million passenger journeys per annum. The NER also had many spectacular bridges and viaducts on it’s lines, many of which remain today (e.g. Royal Border Bridge over the River Tweed, High Level Bridge over the River Tyne).
    · Following the appointment of George Gibb as General Manager (1891-1906), the NER was one of the leading exponents in the UK of improved efficiency practices such as electrification (North Tyneside suburban lines electrified in 1904, Newport-Shildon freight line in 1916) and larger wagon sizes (eg 20 ton capacity coal wagons were introduced in 1903).
    · The NER had about 600 passenger stations. Some of the largest, and most admired for their architectural features, included: York, Newcastle Central, Hull Paragon – all of which remain.
    · It had substantial investments in railway-served docks such as those at Hull, Tyne Dock, Hartlepool and Middlesbrough.
    · The NER's route was, and remains, a key part of the East Coast Main Line. During the 19th Century ‘races to the north’, NER locomotives hauled the express trains between York and Edinburgh.
    · After World War 1 the UK government, recognising the significant efficiency advantages that were obtained during the war by pooling all railway operations, decided to compel the railway companies to join together into 4 larger companies (known as the ‘Grouping’ of 1923). At this time the NER was absorbed into the East Coast group which became known as the London and North Eastern Railway (L&NER).
    JackDownUnder

  3. #243
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    Keep up the good work Jack

  4. #244
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    Default The approaches to Chaloner's Whin at York

    North East England during the steam era. The early summer of 1920. A brand new Great Northern Railway Gresley H4 Class 2-6-0 is in charge of the 9:50 a.m. Express from London King's Cross for Edinburgh as it approaches Chaloner's Whin Junction to the south of York. A strike in the coal mines has railway companies across the country trying to economise on fuel consumption and the shedmaster at Kings Cross has chosen a new H4 to haul the express. A pity I could not find a Jay Holland G.N.R. livery version of the C1 Class Large Atlantic on the DLS. Whilst the G.N.R. locomotive is already running on North Eastern Railway metals the East Coast Joint Company agreement was that the locomotive change to an N.E.R. locomotive would take place at York, not Doncaster. The N.E.R. would retain haulage of the train from York all the way to Edinburgh with a change at Newcastle, despite passing on to North British Railway tracks at Berwick Upon Tweed.







    The Lower Quadrant signals suit the N.E.R. pre-grouping era. From what I have read in the N.E.R.A. publication on N.E.R. signalling it was a lower quadrant signalled company. Upper Quadrant and Electric light signalling was retrofitted during the LNER and BR eras. Some original N.E.R. era lower quadrant signals remained in place late in to B.R. days at some sites.

  5. #245
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    Default Aerial Shots of the Border Counties Railway

    North east England during the steam era. Some aerial views of Reedsmouth Junction and Bellingham from my BCR Reedsmouth and Bellingham route.






  6. #246

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    Quote Originally Posted by IanOHoseason View Post
    Real Home Country for me, this! - I especially like the Q7.
    The Brandon Bus brings me to one of my WIPs. I have just begun to adapt the ECML just south of Durham to steam days, in TANE, with a bit of modeller's licence!
    It's very early days, and most of the textures need changing, but here is a screenshot. The A4 is on the main line, Darlington bound, whilst the A3 has been diverted via Bishop Auckland. In the background, a freight off the Consett line is heading for Bishop.[IMG][/IMG]
    where did you get them coaches

  7. #247
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    I believe the coaches are by the late andi06, Gresley Teaks(I believe the name is), they come in different liveries.

  8. #248
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    Super Speed Maglev is quite correct. Look for Greeley 61’-6” coaches, by Andi06 on the DLS. You can configure to a number of liveries and conditions.
    Ian

  9. #249
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    Hi

    Some original N.E.R. era lower quadrant signals remained in place late in to B.R. days at some sites.
    There were still some NE lower quadrants in place at Harrogate station the last time I was there about 5 or 6 years ago. I believe they may have been replaced by colour light signals now though.

    Regards

    Brian

  10. #250
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    Thanks for that Kenilworth. Jackdownunder has his own route set around Harrogate/Starbeck during 1914. I know of one NER era upper quadrant signal. I forget where, might have even been Harrogate, but the photograph is on a platform and the signal is beneath the canopy. A lower quadrant arm was out of the question because it could have smacked in to the head of passengers waiting beneath. Not a good start to the journey.

  11. #251
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    @borderreiver.

    In your post #244 you have shown some of what appears to be East Coast Joint Stock carriages in your screenies, they look quite tidy! Are they available? I'm guessing they're from Paulz Trainz, payware?

    Rob.

  12. #252
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    Hi Robd, you guess correctly. I am part way through a very large ongoing project to have Paul build the consists for each of the five scheduled day time express East Coast Joint Stock trains. So far Paul has built the 46ft6in and 56ft6in Luggage vans, the catering cores for each of the day time trains and the clerestory coaches to form the 9:50 a.m. Kings Cross departure. Paul is currently working on the Third class coaches for the 1914 10 a.m. Kings Cross departure along with the 6-compartment Diagram 49 Corridor Brake Thirds and the 1921 Diagram 31A Corridor Thirds. Next up will be the Composite coaches for the 1914 10 a.m. Kings Cross departure. There are a lot of coach diagrams to cover the day time ECJS trains on the for the period 1914 - 1922 because of the way the East Coast Joint Company (and indeed both the GNR, NER and NBR companies) decided on their coaching stock requirement. Once the 9:50 a.m. and 10 a.m. consists are complete I will have Paul build the remaining coaches for the 10:35 a.m., 11:20 a.m. and 2:20 p.m. "Afternoon Scotch Express" departures. I expect that to take most of the rest of this year.

    It may come as a surprise to realise that between 1914 and 1922 there were only five scheduled Anglo-Scottish day time express passenger trains in the summer timetable. Reliefs and duplicates added trains as demand warranted it. For example, the 10 a.m. "Scotch Express" often had a relief train drafted in to run between Kings Cross and Newcastle. In June it was reported as often running on all weekdays, Monday to Friday but in May it usually only ran on Mondays and Fridays. I have not determined the exact time of departure but the 10:10 a.m. time slot was for the morning GNR luncheon car express for Leeds. Perhaps the relief ran at 10:20, to maintain a separation from the 10:35. Even in ECJS days the 10 a.m. "Scotch Express" was only for passengers holding tickets for Edinburgh and points north thereof.

    Post-grouping some of the ECJS clerestory roof coaches had only short lives in East Coast main Line stock, but some lasted until the mid to late 1930s in lesser express trains on the sections. The elliptical roof coaches had longer lives in East Coast main line stock, being cascaded to the LNER sections in the mid to late 1930s as new 61ft Gresley end vestibule stock was brought in to service on the ECML. Several of these coaches lasted in to BR Days (At least one Diagram 49 BTK photographed in 1957 in BR Carmine and Cream livery).

    Edited to expand this - The 56ft6in Gangway Brake vans had very long lives in the sections' and BR regions van stock. There were only a couple of actual "parcels trains" on the ECML in the pre-grouping and LNER eras. Most was carried in vans attached to GNR secondary passenger trains and the 56ft6in ex-ECJS and ex-GNR BGs were the predominant type employed right through in to early BR days (up to six attached at a time and often at both ends of the train). During the BR nationalisation era the ex-ECJS and ex-GNR 56ft6in BGs roamed far and wide across the network.

    I have written it before, but Steve Banks found that something like two-thirds of LNER coaching stock remained of pre-grouping origin at the start of WWII and even by nationalisation the proportion of carriages of pre-grouping origin remained as high as 50%.
    Last edited by borderreiver; March 19th, 2018 at 12:59 PM.

  13. #253
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    Thank you borderreiver for the background info to your layout project - quite interesting and, by the sound of it, quite a big, long term investment and undertaking on your part!

    I expect Paulz will make the EC stock generally available sometime - I'm sure he wouldn't want to miss a sale!

    Rob.
    Last edited by robd; March 19th, 2018 at 02:45 PM.

  14. #254
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    Did you take any images when you were there

    Quote Originally Posted by Kennilworth View Post
    Hi



    There were still some NE lower quadrants in place at Harrogate station the last time I was there about 5 or 6 years ago. I believe they may have been replaced by colour light signals now though.

    Regards

    Brian
    JackDownUnder

  15. #255
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    Hello jack

    There are some shots on the following webiste link, though they are UQ signals, probably installed during the LNER era.

    http://www.disused-stations.org.uk/f...on/index.shtml

    Some good shots of Cordio Junction on the ECML at Northallerton.

    Edit --- A 1920 shot of harrogate station.

    https://www.rcts.org.uk/branches/wes...tation%20c1920

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