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Thread: North East England - Steam Days Screenshots - Large Screenshots Possible

  1. #196
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    The carriage roster comes from the North Eastern Railway Association. https://sites.google.com/site/northe...ayassociation/ They have carriage roster books for 1926 and 1932. 1926 is effectively the last NER roster for 1922. I have Bradshaw Reprints for July 1922 and July 1938 but they were purchased online through book sellers. The NERA publication covers the LNER North Eastern Area, so while North Yorkshire is included, West Yorkshire beyond Leeds/Harrogate/Ilkley is not. Great Northern and Great Central sections were part of the LNER Southern Area (along with the Great Eastern lines). The Great Northern Railway Society page is https://www.gnrsociety.com/
    Last edited by borderreiver; December 8th, 2017 at 03:18 PM.

  2. #197
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    Default Blackhill, 1926 Branch Trains

    Northeast England during the steam era. Still around Blackhill in County Durham but it is 1926 during the LNER era. At 8 a.m. an LNER E5 class 2-4-0 waits for its 8:05 a.m. departure with the 7:10 a.m. Durham to Newcastle train. In Platform One an LNER D23 Class 4-4-0 waits for 8:07 a.m. and the morning passenger train departure for Darlington via Tow Law, Crook and Bishop Auckland. The E5 is hauling a Newcastle Link A set with an extra Third class coach added to make it a five coach consist. The D23 is hauling a Darlington Link B set with an extra Third class coach added to make it a four coach consist. Both are made up of 49ft coaches, though the Newcastle link A set is made up of older arc roof coaches originally built for the North Tyneside commuter services at the turn of the century. The Darlington Link B set is formed from newer elliptical roof coaches. Two five compartment Brake Thirds to Diagram 150 (code YB 5) and a Composite to Diagram 146 (code YC 3-4) form the core of the set. The extra coach added daily at Blackhill is an eight compartment Third to Diagram 148 (code T).

    The D23 has been painted in lined black livery since the grouping, though the E5 has kept lined green livery.










  3. #198
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    Default Golden Plover at Darlington

    North East England during the steam era. Circa 1950 under British Railways at Darlington, A4 number 60031 GOLDEN PLOVER brings an Up ECML express passenger train for London Kings Cross in to the station.




  4. #199
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    Default BCR Progress

    Northeast England during the steam era. Back to the Border Counties Railway and some further progress on the BCR Reedsmouth Junction and Bellingham route. Here I have chosen a D20 4-4-0 to haul the midday train for Hawick.







    Above, the D20 passing Countess Park to the south of Reedsmouth.





    Above, the D20 arriving at and departing from Reedsmouth Junction.



    Above, the D20 crossing the River Rede bridge.



    Above, the D20 between Reedsmouth and Bellingham.



    Above, the D20 arriving at Bellingham.

  5. #200
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    Default More BCR Progress

    North East England during the steam era. I have been doing more work on my BCR Reedsmouth Junction and Bellingham route. Principally installing point rodding, but also culling payware assets with a view to exporting it to the DLS at some point. Hopefully that will be in the early New Year. Here, circa 1948, a former LNER Class J21 0-6-0 brings the early morning goods up from Hexham for Riccarton Junction. A couple of 12T Vans are road wagons, with traffic for the stations en-route, and to pick up consignments destined for Hawick and stations beyond there in Scotland. One of Reedsmouth Junction shed's J21s will shunt the train at Reedsmouth while the train engine takes on water. At other stations the train engine will have to do the shunting. With the BCR being a rural line in a sparsely populated area there won't be a lot of it to do.









    Above, the J21 comes past Countess Park with the morning unfitted goods for Riccarton while the Reedsmouth Junction station engine waits in the southern headshunt for its arrival.





    Above, the J21 arrives at Reedsmouth Junction station.









    Above, the Reedsmouth Station engine shunts the train.

  6. #201
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    Default BCR Progress

    North East England during the steam era. The Class J21 0-6-0, number 65028 from the previous post continues on its way with the early morning Hexham to Riccarton Junction unfitted goods train. It is a full day's work for the J21 and crew, covering the run from Hexham to Riccarton Junction and its return. The main spots for traffic are Reedsmouth Junction and Bellingham, the principal town on the route. Bellingham only has around 2,000 inhabitants but is a market town for the North Tyne valley. Reedsmouth has sidings for exchange with the ex-NBR Wansbeck branch to Scots Gap, where it joins the Morpeth to Rothbury line. There are Army ranges at Otterburn, the nearest station being West Woodburn and there is a small but steady flow of military traffic to and from the station. The arms manufacturer Armstrong Vickers also has firing ranges in the area, with sidings at Broomhope, between Reedsmouth and West Woodburn.





    Above, the TW Worsdell J21 0-6-0 departs Reedsmouth after dropping off wagons for Reedsmouth Junction.







    Above, the J21 0-6-0 is captured between Reedsmouth and Bellingham while proceeding at a stately 25 mph.





    Above, the J21 0-6-0 arrives at Bellingham. The signalman is not in the token exchange stand as the train will stop at Bellingham and is booked time to shunt at the station before continuing to the north west towards Keilder and Riccarton. The 12T Vans are stopped right beside the station's goods shed, which is situated on the platform. This minimises the distance any consignments have to be moved between the road wagons and the shed, which is not much larger than a single covered wagon. Up to around 1950 the ex-NBR J36 0-6-0 and D30 4-4-0 would have been seen more frequently than ex-NER types. Photographs on the BCR and Wansbeck lines tend to predominantly be from the 1950s, by which time the J21s, J25s, D20s, D49s, BR Standard 2MT and 3MT locos were being seen rather than ex-NBR classes.
    Last edited by borderreiver; December 28th, 2017 at 07:20 PM.

  7. #202
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    Default BCR Progress Again

    North East England during the steam era. My Class J21 0-6-0 continues her way over BCR metals. The last post saw her arrive at Bellingham. Here she shunts the station yard and proceeds on her way to Riccarton Junction.



    Above, the Cattle truck is placed beside the loading dock for loading later. Cattle wagons were mostly common user stock and examples built by the LMS and GWR greatly outnumbered those built by the LNER. The final GWR design became the basis for the BR Standard cattle van and it can be a challenge to differentiate between the last ones built by the GWR, those built to the GWR design by BR in 1949/50 and the BR Standard Cattle Wagon built during the early 1950s.





    Above, the locomotive runs around the train.



    Above, after placing the brake van behind the cattle wagon in the loading dock line, placing the coal wagon in the short spur for the coal merchant.







    Above, after re-attaching the brake van to the rear of the train, running around and taking up position at the head of the train.





    Above, departing Bellingham.



    In the countryside to the west of Bellingham.

  8. #203
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    Default BCR Progress - west of Bellingham

    North East England in the steam era. The conclusion of the Class J21 0-6-0's journey across the short T:ANE route, here to the west of Bellingham at the occupation crossing for "The Riding".




  9. #204
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    Default ECML Parcels Progress 1925

    North East England during the steam era. Returning to the East Coast Main Line circa 1925 during the LNER period, the 5:12 a.m. Down York to Newcastle parcels train makes its way north through County Durham around 7 a.m. in the harsh morning sunlight.

    Below, a B15 Class 4-6-0, number 799 hauls the train through Croxdale station and is about to cross the River Wear viaduct. The train is made up of several different pre-grouping Full Brakes. Predominantly of the 56ft6in length favoured by the GNR and ECJS from around 1905, there is a sole example of a 46ft6in ex-ECJS Diagram 36 clerestory roof Full Brake. Attached at York are three bogie vans from the LMS, GWR and SR. The LMS probably from Manchester via Leeds with the SR and GWR vans coming via GCR metals and Sheffield.



    Below, the train passes Browney Colliery Signal box and Langley Moor.





    Below, the B15 continues north past Bridge House Junction and crosses the Browney River viaduct near Relly Mill Junction.





    Below, the B15 rests at Durham station before continuing on its way to its destination at Newcastle Central.


  10. #205
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    Default 10 a.m. from Edinburgh at Newcastle July 1914

    North East England during the steam era. July 1914 at Newcastle Central and the N.E.R. top link engine, a Raven Z Class 4-4-2 of Gateshead shed has just backed on to the 10 a.m. express passenger train from Edinburgh and is preparing to depart for London King's Cross, though it will relinquish charge of the train to a G.N.R. large boilered Atlantic at York for the leg of the journey to Grantham. There the engine will change out with a Kings Cross shed Atlantic for the final run to Kings Cross. This is the relief service for the 10:15 a.m. Up Scotch Express from Edinburgh to Kings Cross. That train will have portions from Aberdeen, Perth, Glasgow and Edinburgh.

    Below, the Z Class Atlantic is coupled up to an EC Diagram 36 46ft6in Cowlairs built Luggage van (Full Brake). The East Coast Main Line had an insatiable demand for vans, many being used by travellers to and from Scotland to stow their trunks and boxes. Few people "travelled light", especially not First Class passengers.





    Below, views of the E.C.J.S. clerestory roofed catering vehicles on the 10 a.m. EC Diagram 77A Restaurant First, EC Diagram 30 Pantry Third and EC Diagram 31 Open Third with Pantry. All built at Doncaster and until this summer of 1914 were the top link of catering on the East Coast Main Line. The new set put in to service for the 10 a.m. from London and 10:15 a.m. return from Edinburgh has an all elliptical roof makeup with a steel built eight-wheel Kitchen car, Open Dining First and Open Dining Third. It will set the three-car catering core in place on the principal E.C.M.L. expresses for the next thirty five years.







    Below, the view of the 46ft 6in EC Diagram 36 Luggage Van. This is already superseded as the main bogie van by the 56ft 6in E.C.J.S Luggage Van embodied by the EC Diagram 39 type and its Diagram 35 predecessor. The 56ft 6in Luggage Van (full brake/BG) of E.C.J.S and G.N.R. origins would be a familiar sight on the E.C.M.L. until the early 1960s.


  11. #206
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    Default Acklington, Amble Junction and Chevington 1905

    North East England during the steam era. Edwardian days in rural Northumberland during the mid-1900s. Early morning activity on the East Coast Main Line. It will be several hours before the first up express passenger train from Edinburgh to London Kings Cross flies through and there are only five daytime express passenger trains scheduled each way on a normal summer weekday between July and September.

    Here a TW Worsdell A Class 2-4-2T brings the morning branch passenger train off the Amble branch at Amble Junction. The train is made up of six-wheel coaches. Chrisaw's Lower Quadrant LSWR signals are on the gantry but they are close enough to the Mackenzie & Holland signals bought in by the N.E.R. for its signal installations on the Northern Division.



    Morning stopping passenger train at Acklington station. The village only had about 200 inhabitants in the 1900s, though it would grow somewhat when the RAF opened an airfield here in the 1930s. Surprisingly, Acklington station remains open for passengers to this day, though unmanned. The daily service amounts to a couple of commuter trains formed of two-card class 142 Pacer DMUs. This sparse frequency is not too far removed from that provided in NER days!




    A 59 Class 0-6-0 hauls a down goods along the independant line between Chevington station and Amble junction.



    The 59 Class and A Class pass each other.



    The A Class arrives at Chevington.



    The 59 Class rejoins the down main line at Amble Junction.



    The 1463 Class passes Amble Junction in the up direction.



    The A Class has run around the branch train at Chevington and hauls it across to the down line before placing it in the branch bay.



    The 1463 Class arrives at Chevington, the first of around four trains to stop here in the up direction on the way to Newcastle, picking up any passengers from the Amble branch. There are less than a hundred inhabitants at East and West Chevington hamlets and they are both more than half a mile away from the station.



    Continuing on its way to Newcastle the train is to the south of Chevington station. Next stop is Widdrington, another station that retains passenger service to this day, though again, only the sparse commuter service provided by the Northen Rail Class 142 Pacer DMU assigned to the service.


  12. #207

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    Can I just say this thread is one of my favourites on these forums and I look forward to updates everytime I log on. Your route has inspired me to recreate my own slice of the NER which you can see on my 'Burnham Fey' thread. Can I ask are you planning to commission any of the earlier locos like the Fletcher 901 class or my personal favourites the Raven A2s and the one-off EE1? Oh; and where did you get the diagonal wood fence at Chevington, I've looked everywhere for one like that.
    Last edited by nathanmallard; January 10th, 2018 at 08:13 PM.

  13. #208
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    Hi nathanmallard. Thanks for the kind words. I am not commissioning any locos from Paul atm as my big project with him right now is the East Coast Joint Stock coaches. That is going to take up quite an amount of time and money. I have already commissioned older locos such as the Fletcher BTP 0-4-4T, Tennant 1463 Class 2-4-0 and McDonnell 59 Class 0-6-0. I have no current plans to delve further in to the Fletcher era locos such as the 901 Class 2-4-0, even though ten of them were still in service at December 1922. They were very much a Darlington loco, with examples used as station pilots by WWI and hauling trains over the Stainmore line to Tebay and Penrith. I would have a use for one or two at Darlington on my ECML section in County Durham but other priorities are taking up the cash.

    Gaps I have in the N.E.R. stud are the S and S1 Class 4-6-0s, V Class 4-4-2 Atlantics and Raven's 4-6-2 Class Pacifics (the L.N.E.R. A2). No plans to fill those gaps just yet.

    The fencing at Chevington is C+ SF PDC Midland Platform Fencing Diagonal by itareus. They are on the DLS. Itareus also does C+ SF LDC Midland Fencing diagonal and C+ SF LDC Ground Fencing Post & Rail. In fact do a search for itareus and see just how much they have available.

  14. #209

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    Thanks for the pointer on the fences borderreiver. That's fine, I do really like those ECJS coaches and it is clear that a lot of time and effort has gone in to them. I ask only because I have the drawings for these locomotives (as well as some from the Furness Railway, the GC and the Hull & Barnsley) and I may commission them myself at some point. It's lovely to see any pre-grouping types in Trainz, I'm certainly glad about what we've got.

  15. #210
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    Default Back to the BCR - New Signal

    North East England during the steam era. I have been very lucky to have chrisaw build a signal for Reedsmouth Junction based on the actual prototype signal. I hope that this will be available on the DLS. The tall lattice signal has three arms, two four foot home arms for access to Platform 1 (BCR to Riccarton) and Platform 3 (Wansbeck Branch platform) with a miniature arm for access to the Wansbeck loop. Sig T Feathers installed to operate it ( straight, right 1 and right 2). Colour photographs from the 1960s indicate that the original lower quadrant NBR signals were still in situ. Neither the LNER not BR spent money changing them to upper quadrant arms. I think that they were supplied by a contractor. Certainly in the same period the N.E.R. turned to McKenzie and Holland to supply and fit major signalling installations.

    Here in the early BR period, a BR Std 77XX 3MT brings a morning four coach stopping passenger train from Newcastle in to Reedsmouth Junction. It is bound for Hawick. It is a cloudy, wet morning, which is far from unknown during the summer up in the North Tyne Valley. The shots include approaching and passing the new signal.








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