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Thread: American Tank Engines

  1. #1
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    Default American Tank Engines

    While we tend to favor larger locomotives with tenders for shunters, what's everybody using for their standard gauge tank engines? I have the C-16 and some tiny 0-4-0s, but what else is there?

  2. #2

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    I was always under the impression that the US didn't use that many tank engines, besides the big express CNJ ones and the Baldwin 0-4-0s...

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    The Boston and Albany (part of the NYC but a separate entity) used them for commuter service out of Boston.
    http://www.railarchive.net/nyccollection/ba306.htm
    John
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  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by JCitron View Post
    The Boston and Albany (part of the NYC but a separate entity) used them for commuter service out of Boston.
    Link removed...
    Pretty interesting locos you've found there, John. Not just due to it being a tank engine, but also having a standard-gauge 2-6-6 wheel arrangement, something incredibly rare here in the US. Those'd be a real treat for us steam fans.

    Also found this one on the same site.

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    I found a couple interesting ones.
    This first one almost looks like it has a tender! But the site does confirm that it's a 2-4-4t:


    This second one is plain pretty:
    Copper-capped

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    Tank engines have limited capacity to carry fuel and water so applications tend to be a but limited in the US where stations, service facilities, and so on are often quite far apart. In Europe for example stations and service facilities tended to be closer together so fuel and water capacity weren't a problem so they (justifiably) used a lot of them. In the US they were used primarily for, commuter service, shunting around large industrial complexes, and an occasional RR yard.

    Cute as they are can you imaging traveling from NY to San Fran on a train pulled by an 0-6-0T? As Trainzers we would love it - otherwise it would be the trip from hell.

    Ben
    Trestle Man

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    Quote Originally Posted by chris2001trainz2010 View Post
    Pretty interesting locos you've found there, John. Not just due to it being a tank engine, but also having a standard-gauge 2-6-6 wheel arrangement, something incredibly rare here in the US. Those'd be a real treat for us steam fans.

    Also found this one on the same site.
    That is one cool locomotive. It looks almost British with the side panels the way they are.

    The B&A locomotives, that were gone long before I was born, were pretty stocky looking gems. It must've been awesome seeing these in operation from South Station, around the Newton Loop, and back via Needham Jct. and Riverside. This line today is the Newton branch of the MBTA "High Speed" trolley line, which once hosted PCCs instead of BREDA LRVs. The loop its self still exists with parts out of service and other parts still run as a freight branch.

    The MBTA acquired this route in 1959, ending the service for these critters.

    John
    John
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    Plans and a photo of the largest tank engine in the US (an 0-10-0T) are on pages 46 and 47 of the August, 1973 issue of MR Magazine.

    Would make a very interesting addition to Trainz I'd think.

    Ben
    Trestle Man

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    Default From one model, came many...

    Quote Originally Posted by hauntedclipp View Post
    ...This second one is plain pretty:
    Back in the 1960s, Rex Engineering made a S Scale (freelance) model of similar 2-4-4T 2nd pic, below) by using the running gear (and cab) of the company's model of a B&O 0-4-0 Dockside loco (1st pic, below.)





    And then a few years later, Rex made a freelance 2-4-0 and tender (pic below) based on their (freelance) 2-4-4T...



    Which they soon "stretched" into a 2-6-0...



    Which later was the basis for their 0-6-0 model...

    Last edited by wva-usa; May 27th, 2015 at 10:14 PM.

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  10. #10

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    Courtesy of:
    http://espee.railfan.net/nonindex/st...reg_bailey.jpg


    This is a Sister Locomotive to US Plywood #11 out at the Northwest Train Museum. They have 3 of this locomotive class/type, all sisters owned/operated by Weyrhauser at some point or another, and there is a 4th floating around in someones personal collection out here, mostly all are rusting away though.


    This last one operates out at the Mt Rainer Scenic Railway.

    Anyway, point being, though no where near as mainstream as in Europe, America has had its tank engines too....

    -Falcus

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    "Fireless" tank locos were also fairly common in the U.S., being used around various sorts of industries.

    The last steam locomotives in use on the C&O Railway were three Class C-8, 0-6-0T "fireless cookers," built by the H.K. Porter Co. in 1949, which were used to switch cars at the chemical plants on Blaine Island near South Charleston, WV, until the mid-1960s. The C-8 was "fireless" in the sense that they had no firebox. Their boilers were "charged" with steam supplied by one of the plant's boiler systems. One full charging plus several partial recharging kept the "fireless cookers" working for a full day. The fireless steam locos were used, rather than conventional steam or diesel-electirc locos, due to the explosive environment of the chemical plants. The C-8 locos were serviced at the C&O's engine terminal at Handley, WV.

    Last edited by wva-usa; May 27th, 2015 at 11:27 PM.

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  12. #12
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    That Southern Pacific had a larger tank to go with it, I'll have to look for the photo, and it was appropriately named a Beached Whale!

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