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Blog Comments

  1. pdwood's Avatar
    Yes, good luck. You should try the 3D tiles since you then get much of what you need ready made in the route. I did this with Rjukanbanen in Norway using free raster maps with height data and was amazed at the result. Very good.
  2. mp202's Avatar
    Good luck, Joshe! You have gotten farther than most people with this program.
  3. HLJames's Avatar
    Another thing that should be considered is that shortlines aren't likely to buy massive amounts of power, they might only acquire a handful. As an example: the SD40-2's would make sense for a shortline to perhaps pickup about 8, while acquiring over 50 of them isn't likely at all. Another example of this can be if there's only 55 engines in existence, the shortline won't pickup nearly all of them and instead might only get a handful, like 3 of them. Just something else to think about, since I've noticed this with some fictional shortlines at JontedRail
  4. whitepass's Avatar
    More like 2000 or 2001 as Trainz came out in 2000.
  5. SantaFebuff's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Wessex_Electric_Nutter
    Thats great, sounds about right, but what about if you are into passenger services? Trains are not often loads of cars in surburban situations, but more like shorter trains and far more of them. One thing I like to simulate is a branchline service from a major to minor destination, which the traffic gets dense (therefore challenging) along with lots of station stops until you get away from it all and go down to one track.

    Although, it all depends on several variables. In the UK, lots of train operating companies (old and new) have to deal with lots and lots of passenger traffic to which the timetable is quite manic to say the least, particular example is Basingstoke to Southampton, with regular freight trains and regular passenger trains, from several companies (3 freight, 3 passengers).

    As for replacing stuff, you are right unless the railway is government owned, in which case, you have to deal with a lot of disruption, like placing an extra line (because it increases capacity), rerouting line (likewise), flyovers (likewise), etc. Its Trainz, you can play it how you like
    Great points! I will do more of these explanation. I will get to passenger service when I do. Thank you for your comment, I usually feature US-based advice and point of views, but it's always a refresher to see another perspective. Don't get me wrong, I know plenty about UK railroads. The only problem with that in American railroading is that you'd have to do that pre-1970, being that Amtrak (government ran) took over all passenger service. By the early 2000s, they dropped a lot of the branchline trains.

    Most lines today that exist are main connections or connections that still bring up enough money and usage to be worth keeping.
  6. Wessex_Electric_Nutter's Avatar
    Thats great, sounds about right, but what about if you are into passenger services? Trains are not often loads of cars in surburban situations, but more like shorter trains and far more of them. One thing I like to simulate is a branchline service from a major to minor destination, which the traffic gets dense (therefore challenging) along with lots of station stops until you get away from it all and go down to one track.

    Although, it all depends on several variables. In the UK, lots of train operating companies (old and new) have to deal with lots and lots of passenger traffic to which the timetable is quite manic to say the least, particular example is Basingstoke to Southampton, with regular freight trains and regular passenger trains, from several companies (3 freight, 3 passengers).

    As for replacing stuff, you are right unless the railway is government owned, in which case, you have to deal with a lot of disruption, like placing an extra line (because it increases capacity), rerouting line (likewise), flyovers (likewise), etc. Its Trainz, you can play it how you like