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higsy98
March 27th, 2013, 06:44 PM
Just a simple question how do you weather locos in gimp??

steamboateng
March 27th, 2013, 07:10 PM
Gimp supports layers, and layers are the secret to weathering. Many tutes out there on using layers. The function is the same, regardless of format. Layers simply project an image below it with an image at a given opacity %. It's the concept that's important, not the mechanics. Layers can be imposed upon layers, all adding up to a cohent whole.

higsy98
March 27th, 2013, 08:54 PM
Gimp supports layers, and layers are the secret to weathering. Many tutes out there on using layers. The function is the same, regardless of format. Layers simply project an image below it with an image at a given opacity %. It's the concept that's important, not the mechanics. Layers can be imposed upon layers, all adding up to a cohent whole.

ok im a bit confused but ok.

Paulsw2
March 27th, 2013, 10:13 PM
A basic approach would be to use the 'render - fog' command to create separate layers for 'grime', 'dust', 'rust', 'dirt' using different RGB values for each. Once the layers are set up, you can vary the opacity level for each to get the 'look' of weathering you want:

http://i114.photobucket.com/albums/n264/paulsw2/J39line-up6.jpg

Paul

JCitron
March 28th, 2013, 01:11 PM
ok im a bit confused but ok.

It's not as difficult as it seems.

In the very olden days, long before computer graphics, people would use sprays to seal the different "layers" of chalk and paint to keep each one from interfering with the other. Today with programs such as Gimp and Photoshop, people use layers. Each layer can then be protected from the other, and then combined at the end. This is one of the main advantages of using layers because you can control what you're doing and undo the damage at that level without starting all over again.

Layers also allow you to float your "decals" into place. With layers, you can move and adjust things such as logos and graffiti (decals) to get them just right before adding them permanently on the first go around

Another advantage of using the layers is for transparency or thinness of the textures over each other without erasing the texture that's underneath. Unlike the real world, computer textures are subtractive meaning they replace each other, not additive like paints which would darken with each subsequent placement of "paint" or ink.

Once all the different parts are to your satisfaction, you can then "flatten" or combine the layers into a final graphic and all the parts will add together to make the paint as you want it.

John

boleyd
March 29th, 2013, 08:08 AM
Is there a way to weather an existing item on the DLS? Perhaps some nice clean track-side thing that needs some grime. Lots of assets look very pretty and well detailed but seem to lack character. Might be fun to add that with Gimp layers as described above.

JCitron
March 29th, 2013, 11:19 AM
Is there a way to weather an existing item on the DLS? Perhaps some nice clean track-side thing that needs some grime. Lots of assets look very pretty and well detailed but seem to lack character. Might be fun to add that with Gimp layers as described above.

There sure is, Dick.

Very easily download the asset, open for edit in Explorer, and change the textures as you wish. As an added step though, you might want to clone the asset so you have a working copy instead of editing the original.

I did this myself at one point to make rusty track with coal cinder ballast.

John

higsy98
March 30th, 2013, 04:02 PM
It's not as difficult as it seems.

In the very olden days, long before computer graphics, people would use sprays to seal the different "layers" of chalk and paint to keep each one from interfering with the other. Today with programs such as Gimp and Photoshop, people use layers. Each layer can then be protected from the other, and then combined at the end. This is one of the main advantages of using layers because you can control what you're doing and undo the damage at that level without starting all over again.

Layers also allow you to float your "decals" into place. With layers, you can move and adjust things such as logos and graffiti (decals) to get them just right before adding them permanently on the first go around

Another advantage of using the layers is for transparency or thinness of the textures over each other without erasing the texture that's underneath. Unlike the real world, computer textures are subtractive meaning they replace each other, not additive like paints which would darken with each subsequent placement of "paint" or ink.

Once all the different parts are to your satisfaction, you can then "flatten" or combine the layers into a final graphic and all the parts will add together to make the paint as you want it.

John
how do you weather the trucks

JCitron
March 30th, 2013, 04:26 PM
how do you weather the trucks

The same way. People spray light layers of chalk dust on the sides of the trucks to represent ballast dust and brake dust. In the real models, they have to be careful of pick-up wheels so they remove the wheels first. For us it's a bit easier with the 3d models. We still have to be careful not to put the dust on the wrong parts though.

John

higsy98
March 30th, 2013, 05:25 PM
The same way. People spray light layers of chalk dust on the sides of the trucks to represent ballast dust and brake dust. In the real models, they have to be careful of pick-up wheels so they remove the wheels first. For us it's a bit easier with the 3d models. We still have to be careful not to put the dust on the wrong parts though.

John
does it have to be opened seperately because the trucks are a separate file.

higsy98
March 31st, 2013, 09:11 PM
bump thread im just going to do this.

Paulsw2
April 1st, 2013, 06:39 PM
Yes, the bogie is a separate asset and you need to clone this, then open it for edit and proceed to weather its textures in the same way as for the loco body. A key point here is to get a good match between bogie and loco body. Re-using the same RGB and opacity values for the rust/grime/dirt/dust layers should achieve this.

Paul