PDA

View Full Version : SG Shay's for 2012?



SD40T-2
December 3rd, 2012, 03:13 PM
Greetings,

I've been looking around for some sweet standard gauge shays for my branchline, but the only ones I can find are narrow gauge models. Anyone know where to look?

Thanks,

Brian

haddock56
December 3rd, 2012, 03:47 PM
Ben Neal has a Lima standard gauge two-truck shay at Subpar Productions. I too was hoping for a standard gauge 3-truck or 4-truck shay like the Lima-built Class D. If you can afford payware try Paulz Trainz. He can give you a quote on the commission price.

philskene
December 3rd, 2012, 08:16 PM
Hi Brian --

See the second locomotive in the firth image in Post #1 here:

http://forums.auran.com/trainz/showthread.php?91163-14-of-Ben-Neal%E2%80%99s-steam-locomotives-error-free-in-TS12

And this video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sEFTr6eQxXw

Phil

SD40T-2
December 4th, 2012, 12:39 AM
I agree, a four-truck shay would be interesting. They didn't do very well on the true logging railroads, but when the WM(?) heard about the low speed HIGH horsepower ratings that they had, they put it to work as a yard switcher. It's a wonder more railroads didn't catch on. Then again, I'm unaware of how successful it was as a switcher.

wva-usa
December 4th, 2012, 05:09 AM
I agree, a four-truck shay would be interesting. They didn't do very well on the true logging railroads, but when the WM(?) heard about the low speed HIGH horsepower ratings that they had, they put it to work as a yard switcher. It's a wonder more railroads didn't catch on. Then again, I'm unaware of how successful it was as a switcher.

They weren't used primarily as yard switchers, but the Chesapeake & Ohio Railway (C&O) purchased 16 four-truck shays from Lima, designated as Class C-9, that were used on various branch lines with steeper-than-average grades from the early 1900s through the late 1920s. They did their share of switching at various coal mines on the branches and being shorter in length that a Mallet, they conserved space on the short switchbacks found on some branch lines.

In a level yard, Shays weren't all that more powerful than conventional rod steam locomotives. For example, the three-truck, 150 ton, Shay, built in 1921 for the Greenbrier, Cheat & Elk RR (engine #12 on the GC&E) had a tractive effort just slightly less than a USRA heavy Mikado, which meant that both locomotives had practically the same train starting capacity on level track. However, that 150-ton Shay was capable of exerting 28 percent greater pull on a 4-percent grade and more than double the pull on an 8-percent grade vs. the Mikado. The Shay's forte was its ability to handle more cars on steep grades.

The GC&E and Shay collaborated to add a fourth truck to #12 in 1933, and in the process, created the heaviest Shay (at 196 - 203 tons) ever operated. See pic of the four-truck #12 here (http://Western Maryland 162 ton 3 truck shay (Big 6) which is the 2nd biggest shay ever built).