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ZecMurphy
October 10th, 2012, 07:20 PM
Welcome to the Trains Trivia of the Week thread.

Every Wednesday we will ask you a question here related to trains, and you will have a week to answer the question. Next Wednesday, we will update the previous week's answer and put in a new question again. You can use this thread to discuss your answers.

If you have a trivia question which you want to be featured in this section, email it through to trainznews@n3vgames.com along with the answer.

So you are a ferroequinologist......right? http://forums.auran.com/trainz/images/smilies/asmile.gif

Last week's answer:
The first type of locomotive to use Walschaerts Valve Gear in North America was Mason Fairlie type locomotive (also known as the Mason Bogie).

This week's question:
What railway products was the company McKenzie and Holland known for producing, particularly in Australia?

SD45T-2
October 10th, 2012, 09:01 PM
1995 in late December, 31st I think.

Euphod
October 10th, 2012, 09:45 PM
1995 in late December, 31st I think.

Don't you mean 1996?

http://trn.trains.com/Railroad%20Reference/Railroad%20History/2006/06/BNSF%20Railway%20merger%20family%20tree.aspx

wilh
October 11th, 2012, 07:51 AM
September 25, 1995

itareus
October 11th, 2012, 10:36 AM
As Ed said,

ATSF merged on December 31, 1996 into BN

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BNSF_Railway

Enzo1
October 11th, 2012, 11:39 AM
The big merger was in 1995

itareus
October 11th, 2012, 03:57 PM
This week's question:
In what year did the ‘Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway’ (ATSF) merge with the ‘Burlington Northern Railway’ (BN) to form the Burlington Northern and Santa Fe Railway (BNSF)?


So the question was ATSF merging with BN ...

Extract from the link in Euphod's post:

"Chartered in 1859 as the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe. Burlington Northern Santa Fe Corp. created on September 22, 1995, when BN bought AT&SF's corporate Parent. Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway merged into Burlington Northern Railroad on December 31, 1996, and BN renamed Burlington Northern & Santa Fe Railway"

Zec, you could have started WW3 here ! :D !

VPiH
October 14th, 2012, 05:19 AM
The creation of BNSF started on 22 September 1995. This new holding company formally merged the railways into the Burlington Northern and Santa Fe Railway on 31 December 1996. On 24 January 2005, the railroad's name was officially changed to "BNSF Railway," using the initials of its original name.

ZecMurphy
October 17th, 2012, 01:22 AM
In what year did the ‘Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway’ (ATSF) merge with the ‘Burlington Northern Railway’ (BN) to form the Burlington Northern and Santa Fe Railway (BNSF)?
The ‘Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway’ (ATSF) was formally merged with the ‘Burlington Northern Railway’ (BN) to form the Burlington Northern and Santa Fe Railway (BNSF) on December 31 1996.


This weeks question:
In what year did Southern Pacific 4449 enter service?

big_b
October 17th, 2012, 02:49 AM
In what year did Southern Pacific 4449 enter service?

May 30, 1941

GTW1226
October 17th, 2012, 03:22 PM
First Run May 30 1941

ts2012
October 17th, 2012, 08:31 PM
It entered service on May 30, 1941

ts2012
October 17th, 2012, 08:32 PM
Lol my avatar is the GS-4 SP 4449!

ZecMurphy
October 24th, 2012, 08:29 PM
In what year did Southern Pacific 4449 enter service?
Southern Pacific GS-4 #4449 entered service in May 1941.




This weeks question:
Which real steam locomotive was used as the basis for the steam locomotive in The Polar Express movie (2004)?

ts2012
October 24th, 2012, 08:54 PM
It was the Pere Marquette 1225 Berkshire-type (2-8-4).

flyboy559
October 25th, 2012, 06:31 PM
Pere Marquette 1225

mrjunction
October 26th, 2012, 10:46 AM
Pere Marquette 1225

Aptly chosen PM 1225.(In case anyone has'nt noticed,Christmas is 12-25)

teddytoot
October 26th, 2012, 02:13 PM
Aptly chosen PM 1225.(In case anyone has'nt noticed,Christmas is 12-25)

But ony for Americans. For the rest of the world it is 25-12.

Bhorton
October 26th, 2012, 02:22 PM
When I was Young, I always made it in Trainz as a Big Boy with the CP coaches! :hehe: Proved me wrong!

big_b
November 1st, 2012, 05:03 PM
In what year did the Coronation Scot service of the London Midland and Scottish railway begin operation?

1937

JIb228
November 4th, 2012, 08:48 AM
Which real steam locomotive was used as the basis for the steam locomotive in The Polar Express movie (2004)?

Pere Marquette 1225. Not only was it the basis for the movie, but the book as well. The author grew up near where 1225 was on display. For the movie they also included a few SRI, Steam Railroading Institute, crew members. As well as all the sounds you hear the locomotive make in the movie are form the real 1225.

ZecMurphy
November 4th, 2012, 06:08 PM
Which real steam locomotive was used as the basis for the steam locomotive in The Polar Express movie (2004)?
Pere Marquette Railway’s steam locomotive 1225, currently operational for heritage specials, was used as the basis for the steam locomotive in The Polar Express movie.




This weeks question:
In what year did the Coronation Scot service of the London Midland and Scottish railway begin operation?

big_b
November 9th, 2012, 09:40 AM
In what year did the McKeen Motor Car Company build it's first railcar/railmotor?

1905

Euphod
November 9th, 2012, 09:45 AM
This weeks question:
In what year did the Coronation Scot service of the London Midland and Scottish railway begin operation?

1937 and only ran until 1939.

ZecMurphy
November 11th, 2012, 07:10 PM
In what year did the Coronation Scot service of the London Midland and Scottish railway begin operation?
The Coronation Scot service began operation in 1937.








This weeks question:
In what year did the McKeen Motor Car Company build it’s first railcar/railmotor?

big_b
November 16th, 2012, 05:26 PM
In what year did the first electric train service to operate in Melbourne

1919

jadebullet
November 16th, 2012, 06:27 PM
McKeen built it's first car in 1905.

ZecMurphy
November 21st, 2012, 09:16 PM
In what year did the McKeen Motor Car Company build it’s first railcar/railmotor?
The McKeen Motor Car Company built it’s first railcar/railmotor in 1905.








This weeks question:
In what year did the first electric train service operate in Melbourne?

ZecMurphy
November 21st, 2012, 09:29 PM
In what year did the first electric train service operate in Melbourne?
The first electric train service operate in Melbourne was on the 29th of May 1919 between Sandringham and Essendon.
















This weeks question:
There was a sister train to the Central Railroad of New Jersey's Blue Comet that ran from New York City to Wilkes-Barre. What was its name, and color scheme? (Thank you to Jadebullet for this weeks trivia question)

Euphod
November 21st, 2012, 10:38 PM
This weeks question:
There was a sister train to the Central Railroad of New Jersey's Blue Comet that ran from New York City to Wilkes-Barre. What was its name, and color scheme? (Thank you to Jadebullet for this weeks trivia question)

The Bullet, and Olive Green. Thank you to Jadebullet for this week's trivia answer.(http://forums.auran.com/trainz/showthread.php?66900-Blue-Comet-railroad-terminal-(warning-semi-large-pictures)&p=724783#post724783)

Has it occurred to anyone else that a trivia contest is less than effective in the age of Google?

big_b
November 21st, 2012, 10:54 PM
Yes - no knowledge of railways or trains needed only how to search with google.

Dave

ZecMurphy
November 21st, 2012, 11:11 PM
OTOH, for an online trivia, what is more important? Being the first to answer a question, or learning something new about railways?

We do attempt to make some of the trivia questions difficult, however at the same time we also look for questions that may allow people to learn a little about railways, railway history, etc :)

flyboy559
November 22nd, 2012, 02:23 AM
the atlantic highlands express?

big_b
November 22nd, 2012, 03:01 AM
OTOH,

We do attempt to make some of the trivia questions difficult, however at the same time we also look for questions that may allow people to learn a little about railways, railway history, etc :)

Quite true as you usually end up knowing not only the answer but quite a few other facts as well while searching & reading looking for the right reply to the question.

Dave

Sourdough
November 22nd, 2012, 12:07 PM
I thought the same thing as Ed when this started.....however, I didn't know the answer to any of the questions on my own, but now I do...:cool:

ZecMurphy
December 6th, 2012, 08:04 PM
There was a sister train to the Central Railroad of New Jersey's Blue Comet that ran from New York City to Wilkes-Barre. What was its name, and color scheme? (Thank you to Jadebullet for this weeks trivia question)
The sister train to the Blue Comet was ‘The Bullet’, which was painted dark green.








This weeks question:
What is double double heading, and why is this done? (Thank you to UP8328 for this weeks trivia question)

ZecMurphy
December 6th, 2012, 08:27 PM
There was a sister train to the Central Railroad of New Jersey's Blue Comet that ran from New York City to Wilkes-Barre. What was its name, and color scheme? (Thank you to Jadebullet for this weeks trivia question)
Double Heading (as well as Triple Heading, and so on) is the use of more than one locomotive on the head or point of a train when one of the locomotives in not equipped for M/U operation, with each locomotive having it’s own crew. This is done to provide extra power when hauling a heavy train, and was relatively common in the steam era, and early diesel era. Most trains today have ‘multiple-unit’ cabilities, which allow them to run with only one crew controlling many locomotives in the one consist.
















This weeks question:
What is the purpose of a ‘scotch block’ in a railway yard?

big_b
December 7th, 2012, 05:54 AM
What is the purpose of a ‘scotch block’ in a railway yard

To chock or wedge the wheels to stop train cars from moving
Similar to those used on aircraft & cars

Dave

Bill69
December 7th, 2012, 06:15 PM
This weeks question:
What is the purpose of a ‘scotch block’ in a railway yard?

A scotch block is used to lock a set of points in one particular direction. This is usually to avoid rollingstock straying on to a main line.

Cheers,
Bill69

jordon412
December 7th, 2012, 08:45 PM
Sounds like what we here in the US call a 'derail' . It tends to be a piece of, I assume metal, that is in the shape of a wedge that slopes toward the middle of the tracks, preventing a moving car from ending up on the mainline. It literally derails the car by derailing it to end up with one wheel in between the rails and the other outside the rails. It'll cost a lot of money to 'rerail' the car, which tends to require lifting the car by a crane or something else, but it gets the job done.

wva-usa
December 8th, 2012, 05:52 PM
Sounds like what we here in the US call a 'derail' . It tends to be a piece of, I assume metal, that is in the shape of a wedge that slopes toward the middle of the tracks, preventing a moving car from ending up on the mainline. It literally derails the car by derailing it to end up with one wheel in between the rails and the other outside the rails. It'll cost a lot of money to 'rerail' the car, which tends to require lifting the car by a crane or something else, but it gets the job done.

It depends on how badly the car is derailed, but over the years I've watched railroad crews rerailing a variety of cars and equipment, including loaded 100-ton coal cars and steam locomotive tenders using a "rerailer (http://www.surf-prep.com/id67.html)", with no assistance from a crane required. Pic below:

http://www.surf-prep.com/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/4018-01-R.jpg

Rerailers were commonly carried in the toolboxes of most caboose cars and underneath the tenders on many steam locomotives.

You can see the rerailer mounted above the rear truck in the pic of the Rio Grande tender on this page (http://www.victorianweb.org/cv/rrmuseums/crm/3b.html).

Bill69
December 8th, 2012, 07:57 PM
There are actually diferent types of Scotch Block, some will derail runaway rollingstock and some just lock a set of points as I stated above.

Cheers,
Bill

ZecMurphy
December 13th, 2012, 09:28 PM
What is the purpose of a ‘scotch block’ in a railway yard?
The ‘scotch block’ in a railway yard is also known as a ‘derail’, and is used to derail a train or wagon within the yard, before it reaches the mainline tracks. This prevents a train that has not been permitted to leave the yard (e.g. a runaway wagon) from colliding with a train on the mainline, or derailing on the mainline and blocking the track.
































This weeks question:
What is the purpose of a ‘scotch block’ in a railway yard?

big_b
December 14th, 2012, 02:25 AM
Other answers depending where you look & depending on location as stated above

Scotch block: a wedge or block placed against a wheel to prevent movement.


SpragsOn severe inclines, it is not sufficient to depend on the parking brakes of coaches or wagons to keep them stabled or parked. Sprags are metal (steel) bars that are inserted between the spokes of a wagon's wheels to prevent it from rolling away; scotch blocks or stop blocks are wooden or metal wedges that are placed on the rail under a wheel for the same purpose. Also called scotch blocks / stop blocks

tocfan
December 14th, 2012, 02:06 PM
The purpose of the booster was to increase starting tractive effort for a steam locomotive. Steam locomotives generated their highest horsepower and tractive at speed. They need the booster to start the train and once the train was moving the booster was normally cut off

wva-usa
December 29th, 2012, 04:29 AM
There's an excellent 1922 article (loaded with illustrations and info) from the Sante Fe Magazine about the locomotive booster that can be read online (http://books.google.com/books?id=XObNAAAAMAAJ&pg=RA3-PA69) at Google Books.

ZecMurphy
January 17th, 2013, 09:54 PM
What is the purpose of a ‘booster’ on a steam locomotive?
The booster on a steam locomotive is used to increase, or boost, the tractive effort at slow speeds, or when starting. The booster is a small steam engine attached to the trailing bogie of the locomotive, or in some cases, to the tender bogies, and operates in a similar manner to the traction motors on a diesel, just being steam powered instead of electric.































This weeks question:
What was the role of the ‘Chief Mechanical Engineer’ in a railway company?

Timothetoolman
January 18th, 2013, 03:45 AM
The role of a 'Chief Mechanical Engineer' or CME is to be in charge of the design and construction of, in this case, locomotives and rollingstock. He (or she) is by no means is the sole creator as many people are employed in the drawing office and R&D, but they oversee the entire process from paper to prototype.

Cheers
Tim

wva-usa
January 18th, 2013, 08:27 AM
The job title of "Chief Mechanical Engineer" was used primarily by the railway companies in Britain, Australia, and New Zealand. The nomenclature of the railroad companies in the U.S. was somewhat different, as reflected in the chart below, from page 139 (http://books.google.com/books?id=8_9CAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA139) of the book, Railroad Administration, published in 1920.

http://books.google.com/books?id=8_9CAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA139&img=1&zoom=3&hl=en&sig=ACfU3U2ZW05GSnwy6Ne9Lh9N7E9K8Iuhvw&ci=104%2C120%2C680%2C1212&edge=0

ZecMurphy
January 23rd, 2013, 11:04 PM
What was the role of the ‘Chief Mechanical Engineer’ in a railway company?
The ‘Chief Mechanical Engineer’ was the person who was responsible for the design, construction, and maintenance of locomotives and rolling stock in a railway company.

































This weeks question:
What is the function of ‘thermic syphons’ on a steam locomotive?

LieLestoSbrat
January 27th, 2013, 06:06 PM
To improve the circulation of the water within boiler

robd
January 27th, 2013, 06:21 PM
This weeks question:
What is the function of ‘thermic syphons’ on a steam locomotive?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermic_siphon

ZecMurphy
February 7th, 2013, 09:19 PM
What was the role of the ‘Chief Mechanical Engineer’ in a railway company?
Thermic Syphons are used to improve the circulation of water through the boiler, as well as to increase the heating surface area in a locomotive’s boiler.

































This weeks question:
What is the purpose of a ‘calling on’ signal?

ZecMurphy
February 7th, 2013, 09:37 PM
What is the purpose of a ‘calling on’ signal?
A calling on signal is used to permit a train into an occupied siding, such as to allow a locomotive to couple to it's train. They are used in place of the signalman having to display a green flat to the driver, which is not always practical.

































This weeks question:
When operating on a single track rail line, what is ‘pilotman working’?

Dean_Forest
February 9th, 2013, 03:13 PM
When operating on a single track rail line, what is ‘pilotman working’?

According to my rulebook:


Should a token be lost or so damaged that it cannot be replaced in the instrument or in the case of failure of the token apparatus between two signal boxes, in the event of non availability of an S&T Technician, Working by Pilotman will be introduced as shown in Appendix (b) to this Section G.

AndyB100
February 11th, 2013, 06:49 AM
Indeed - it is also used for single line working on double track in the case of an obstruction, including engineering work, under all forms of block working, be it track circuit block or absolute block.

Essentially, unless all signals admitting trains to a single line section are locked with each other so that nothing can get into the section from either end while another train is in the section, a token or staff has to be carried (or if permitted, the staff can be shown to the driver and a specific ticket for that journey handed to him if another train is following.)

If no token or staff is available, a pilotman has to do the job. He gets authority from the signalman for the train to proceed, gives that authority to the driver, and if the next train through the section is coming from the other end, he travels with the driver as the token/staff.

Some sections are permanently worked by pilotman - Mullingar-Athlone (Formerly ETS Mullingar-Moate and TCB Moate-Athlone, Mullingar has been converted to TCB and Moate is closed) and Lisburn-Antrim (formerly TCB, signals disconnected and loops at Ballinderry and Crumlin clipped (query lifted?) - the panel is still present in Antrim signalcabin, which has been reduced to a gate box, and the panel is unusable anyway)

Another example used to be Antrim-Bleach Green. I think the line was singled in about 1989, and from then on it was worked by Electric Token Block from Antrim to Belfast York Road, and later Belfast Central. Until its closure for refurbishment about ten years later, it was used as a diversion route - I remember in 1995 the Belfast-Lisburn section was closed between Botanic and Adelaide for works related to the new Great Victoria Street station, and trains from Antrim had to run via Bleach Green to reach Belfast, rather than the then main route via Lisburn (as above). To save trains running the whole way to Belfast to exchange tokens, they instituted pilotman working for the weekend so that trains could pass each other on the double track section between Bleach Green and Monkstown.

ZecMurphy
February 12th, 2013, 09:40 PM
When operating on a single track rail line, what is ‘pilotman working’?
Pilotman working is when a person (known as the ‘pilotman’) acts as the token for a section of track. This is a form of ‘staff and ticket’ working, however the pilotman replaces the staff. Verbal authority to enter a section then replaces the ‘ticket’. So long as there is only one ‘pilotman’ for a section, this is safe.

This system is also used where there is a signal failure in automatic train control systems, as well as when a double track rail line has one track closed but services continue to operate on the remaining track (e.g. where a derailed train is blocking on line, but not the other).

































This weeks question:
What is a "doghouse" on a steam locomotive?

haddock56
February 12th, 2013, 10:14 PM
The 'doghouse' on a steam engine was intended as a place for the brakeman to ride near the head end of the train. The D&RG was known to feature these on the K-27 and other 2-8-2s on the famous 3 foot gauge network, of which two parts are still in operation today with almost all the original equipment. The brakeman may have had a rough ride whenever he/she was in the 'doghouse', presumably named bc of the limited space inside of one.

wva-usa
February 13th, 2013, 01:33 AM
The 'doghouse' on a steam engine was intended as a place for the brakeman to ride near the head end of the train. The D&RG was known to feature these on the K-27 and other 2-8-2s on the famous 3 foot gauge network, of which two parts are still in operation today with almost all the original equipment. The brakeman may have had a rough ride whenever he/she was in the 'doghouse', presumably named bc of the limited space inside of one.

Brakemen riding in the head-end brakeman's cabin (or cupola) just needed to learn how to get comfortable... The N&W brakeman in this photo (http://columbusrailroads.com/photogallery-3/N&W 2039 Y-3 1955-1200.jpg) appears to have had the technique down pretty well (one foot resting in the window.) Soon after the N&W first installed the cabins on some tenders the railroad installed steam lines from the locomotive to the "doghouse" to provide heat during cold weather. Some crews on the N&W called the brakeman's cabin "the monkey box". But for that matter, on some roads, the caboose was called the "dog house".

http://wvrailroads.net/images/c/c3/Head_Brakemans_Cabin_or_Dog_House.jpg
Above: Letter from a member of the Order of Railroad Conductors advocating the use of "dog houses" published in a union magazine in 1922.

peterwise
February 14th, 2013, 10:26 AM
A doghouse just has to be the coal tender - think of the coal bunker sometimes found in back gardens/yards.

Peter.

ZecMurphy
February 28th, 2013, 05:15 AM
What is a "doghouse" on a steam locomotive?
Normally, freight operations required both a head-end brakeman and a brakeman at the rear of the train. Often, there wasn't a lot of extra room in the cab. The fireman didn't always like to share his seat with the brakeman and there wasn't really enough room to stand without getting in the way of the fireman. By 1937, new locomotives were built with enough room to seat the head-end brakeman in the cab. Older locomotives were modified during shopping with a small cabin on the top of the tender for the head-end brakeman. This was called a "doghouse". Some companies provided steam heating for the doghouse, particularly where the train would run in cold climates.

































This weeks question:
What is the name of the rack system used on the West Coast Wilderness Railway’s (Originally the Mount Lyell Mining and Railway Company) trains and track?

jordon412
February 28th, 2013, 03:04 PM
That would be the ABT system
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_coast_wilderness_railway

wva-usa
March 2nd, 2013, 09:08 PM
The snippet below, from the History of Baldwin Locomotive Works from 1831 to 1897 (published in 1897), tells how the 2-8-0 wheel arrangement came to be known as the "Consolidation" type of steam locomotive. Following a custom of the times, the Lehigh Valley gave each of its locomotives a name. Because the Lehigh Valley has just completed a merger with the Lehigh & Mahanoy, the locomotive was named "Consolidation" in honor of the corporate union of the two roads. Eventually, more than 33,000 Consolidation type locomotives were built in the U.S., more than any other wheel arrangement.

http://wvrailroads.net/images/4/41/Baldwin_Consolidation.jpg (http://wvrailroads.net/index.php/File:Baldwin_Consolidation.jpg)

ZecMurphy
March 3rd, 2013, 06:30 AM
What is the name of the rack system used on the West Coast Wilderness Railway’s (Originally the Mount Lyell Mining and Railway Company) trains and track?
The rack system used on the West Coast Wilderness Railway is the ‘Abt’ rack system..

































This weeks question:
What name is commonly used for a ‘2-8-0’ type locomotive?

jadebullet
March 6th, 2013, 01:37 PM
Whoa, time travel.

Yeah, Consolidation is the best bet for the answer.

ZecMurphy
March 13th, 2013, 09:35 PM
What name is commonly used for a ‘2-8-0’ type locomotive?
The name commonly used for ‘2-8-0’ type locomotives is a ‘consolidation’.


































































This weeks question:
This month, the locomotive LNER 4472, Flying Scotsman, celebrated an anniversary of it’s completion. What year was the completed, and how old is the locomotive (from the completion year)?

ZecMurphy
March 20th, 2013, 12:05 AM
This month, the locomotive LNER 4472, Flying Scotsman, celebrated an anniversary of it’s completion. What year was the completed, and how old is the locomotive (from the completion year)?
LNER 4472, Flying Scotsman, was completed in 1923, and is 90 years old.


































































This weeks question:
What is the name for a steam-electric locomotive where the boiler powers a generator (operated by simply expansion engines), rather than direct drive to the driving wheels, and does not use a Turbine?

ZecMurphy
March 20th, 2013, 12:07 AM
What is the name for a steam-electric locomotive where the boiler powers a generator (operated by simply expansion engines), rather than direct drive to the driving wheels, and does not use a Turbine?
The name of the steam-electric locomotive design that uses a generator operated by simple expansion engines is the ‘Heilmann’ locomotive.





















This weeks question:
What is the name of the British Rail Class 55 locomotive, and where does the name originate from.

narrowgauge
March 20th, 2013, 12:49 AM
A scotch block is placed near the entrance to a siding to prevent runaways getting on to the main. It is not designed to derail. It is a metal or wooden hinged device that can be flipped over to cover the rail with provision to lock it in the open nor closed position. It is so named because it serves to 'scotch' a wheel. It does not take the place of the traincar brakes. It is a safety and security device.

Peter

Oops! I answered last weeks question and Zec overtook me.

evilrider
March 20th, 2013, 01:19 AM
I love to Travel a long Journey in Trains..

ZecMurphy
March 27th, 2013, 09:52 PM
What is the name of the British Rail Class 55 locomotive, and where does the name originate from.
The name of the British Rail Class 55 locomotive is the ‘Deltic’ locomotive, with the name originating from the ‘Deltic’ design of engine.




















This weeks question:
What is the purpose of ‘Head End Power’?

boyerm25
March 27th, 2013, 09:54 PM
It is to supply power (lighting, heat, cooling, etc.) to the passenger cars on a train. It is also called hotel power (lol).

ZecMurphy
April 11th, 2013, 08:46 AM
What is the purpose of ‘Head End Power’?
The purpose of Head End Power (HEP) is to provide power from the locomotive to the passenger carriages, for heating, lighting, and so on. Some earlier refrigerated containers also required the use of HEP to provide power for the refrigerators.







































This weeks question:
What is the purpose of the Gresley Conjugated Valve Gear?

Bill69
April 13th, 2013, 07:34 PM
Gresley conjugated valve gear is to operate the valves for the centre cylinder. It is, or was, (not sure if the patent has expired) a patented system and was used on some American 3 cylinder locos, as well as British LNER 3 cylinder locos.

Cheers,
Bill69

Engineerkenny
April 13th, 2013, 08:46 PM
if the question this week is about head end power then here's my answer: Head end power is the use of helper locomotives to help a large freight train get up a steep grade for example NS can be using up to 6 helpers on the horseshoe curve This I had learned on extreme trains when I was im going to say maybe 10? By the way if you want to know why I said 6 helpers its because on the Ep. NS Coal train they said they had 6 helpers on! but it mostly looks as if all I should have said was for power:hehe:

Timothetoolman
April 15th, 2013, 12:24 AM
The purpose of the Gresley-designed Conjugated Valvegear is to reduce the vibration of the locomotive's rod vibration (a.k.a hammer blow) on both the track and inside the locomotive. It has the added purpose of using the 2 external cylinders to power in the central cylinder by way of a rocking arm system visible at the head of the cylinders. As well as Gresley designed locomotives of the A1/A3 andA4 class locomotives, it would be later used on other 3 cylinder locomotives around the world. It's one disability as opposed to regular 3 cylinder locomotives with more conventional walsharts valvegear was that the center cylinder tended to wear out faster.

ZecMurphy
April 17th, 2013, 09:28 PM
What is the purpose of the Gresley Conjugated Valve Gear?
The purpose of the Gresley Conjugated Valve Gear is to drive the valve for the centre cylinder on a 3 cylinder loco, by using the valve gear of the outside cylinders to drive special linkages that operate the inside cylinder’s valve.





























This weeks question:
What is the nickname commonly given to the original set of Hunslet ‘Quarry’ class locomotives?

Bhorton
April 18th, 2013, 02:52 PM
I think they were nicknamed Austerity's If I remember rightly (sorry if I have got the wrong hunslet)

I have other idea's, maybe Dolbadarn Or Penrhyn.

I am probably wrong, but what the hey?

jadebullet
April 19th, 2013, 07:31 AM
(from the newsletter)
A pony truck is used to help guide a locomotive's drivers around a curve. They are normally equalized as well so they reduce bouncing and spread out the weight more.

clam1952
April 19th, 2013, 07:49 AM
Original Quarry Hunslets? - Alice Class - after I think the first one.

ZecMurphy
April 21st, 2013, 09:38 PM
What is the nickname commonly given to the original set of Hunslet ‘Quarry’ class locomotives?
The nickname commonly given to the original set of Hunsley ‘Quarry’ class locomotives is the ‘Alice’ class locomotive, referring to the name given to one of the original locomotives built to this design.























This weeks question:
What are the two main purposes of ‘pony’ trucks (bogies) or pony wheels on a steam locomotive?

SD45T-2
April 22nd, 2013, 08:58 AM
They pony wheels on a locomotive are used to guide locomotives through curves and support the front of the loco.

ZecMurphy
April 25th, 2013, 11:40 PM
What are the two main purposes of ‘pony’ trucks (bogies) or pony wheels on a steam locomotive?
The two main purposes of ‘pony’ trucks (bogies) or pony wheels on a steam locomotive are to carry weight (e.g. the firebox) to reduce the axle load, and to guide a locomotive through corners, so as to help reduce wheel/flange wear.























This weeks question:
In what year did the GE ‘Dash 9’ (C44-9W) series of locomotive begin production, and operation?

pdkoester
April 26th, 2013, 12:59 AM
The two main purposes of ‘pony’ trucks (bogies) or pony wheels on a steam locomotive are to carry weight (e.g. the firebox) to reduce the axle load, and to guide a locomotive through corners, so as to help reduce wheel/flange wear.























This weeks question:
In what year did the GE ‘Dash 9’ (C44-9W) series of locomotive begin production, and operation?

I am going to guess about 1993... ATSF units.

Ron_Meinke
April 26th, 2013, 12:31 PM
The CW44 started production in 1993.

inprr
April 27th, 2013, 03:05 AM
ok here is the brain teaser here. true the first true dash 9 came out in '93. but the first ones, set of three, were actually c40-8w, bought by CSX, these were at the end of the build line of the dash 8's. these were the first dash 9 locos. if you dont believe me look for your self. here (http://modeltrains.about.com/od/locomotiveprototypes/a/GE-C44-9W-Locomotive-Profile.htm) -inprr

cascaderailroad
May 1st, 2013, 07:04 PM
Do you know where this loco is right now ? I will tell you ... but you must guess:
http://www.ebtrr.com/pics/nd1495x.jpg

http://www.ebtrr.com/pics/nd1495x.jpg

http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3095/5861733777_aaa950fb31_o.jpg

Bondy007
May 1st, 2013, 09:07 PM
Yes that's true but the question was specifically about the C44-9W series not the C40 so 1993 is technically correct I believe

ZecMurphy
May 9th, 2013, 01:25 AM
In what year did the GE ‘Dash 9’ (C44-9W) series of locomotive begin production, and operation?
The GE ‘Dash 9’ (C44-9W) type locomotive first began production, and operation, in 1993.



























This weeks question:
What is the purpose of ‘tri-cocks’ in a steam locomotive’s cab?

daylightrain
May 28th, 2013, 09:38 PM
Nobody's answered the question, so I will:
Tri-Cocks are small valves used to check the water level if the sight glass breaks or is not giving an accurate reading.

ZecMurphy
July 4th, 2013, 12:02 AM
In what year did the first of the Pennsylvania Railroad's T1 class locomotives enter service?
The first of the Pennsylvania Railroad's T1 class locomotives entered service in 1942.



























This weeks question:
What is the purpose of a 'check valve' on a steam locomotive's boiler?

robd
July 4th, 2013, 04:50 AM
A one way non return valve that allows water to enter the boiler but not to flow back in to the feed system?

R707
July 4th, 2013, 07:22 AM
In order for the water from the injector to enter the boiler at the same pressure, the pressure must be greater than the same boiler pressure. The water from the injector is sped up through the delivery system and hence traveling at about 20MPH the pressure of the water is now a greater pressure and forces the check valve open admitting the water to enter the boiler from the injector.

conductor1945
July 6th, 2013, 03:47 AM
as far I know a check valves is used to prevent backflow of water out of the boiler into the watersupply tank

ZecMurphy
July 11th, 2013, 01:19 AM
What is the purpose of a 'check valve' on a steam locomotive's boiler?
The purpose of a check valve on a steam locomotive’s boiler is to prevent pressurized steam from running back along the pipe. This is most commonly used on the feedwater pipes from the injector or feedwater pump. These are commonly seen on the side of the top of the boiler of many steam locomotives, although some have them located elsewhere as well.




















This weeks question:
When was the last Shay locomotive built, and what builder’s number did it receive?

jordon412
July 11th, 2013, 04:20 PM
That would be Western Maryland Shay #6. Built 05-14-1945, builder number #sn-3354 or just #3354. Currently operating on the Cass Scenic Railroad (State Park) in Cass, West Virginia.
Information from:
http://www.shaylocomotives.com/

wkwood
July 13th, 2013, 11:53 AM
That would be Western Maryland Shay #6. Built 05-14-1945, builder number #sn-3354 or just #3354. Currently operating on the Cass Scenic Railroad (State Park) in Cass, West Virginia.
Information from:
http://www.shaylocomotives.com/

Well wasn't that locomotive a one-off? I mean they had to bring people out of retirement and it wasn't built in the Shay shop because it converted for war production. Actual Shay production ended in 1937. I do like the Cass Scenic Railroad BTW, I've been there a couple of times.. I don't think the Shays ever compare though with the old Baldwin 2_6_6_2T like #110 running in the Black Hills SD.

ZecMurphy
July 17th, 2013, 11:55 PM
When was the last Shay locomotive built, and what builder’s number did it receive?
The last Shay locomotive was built in 1945, wth the builders number 3354. This locomotive was built for the Western Maryland Railway, and is now preserved by the Cass Scenic Railway.




















This weeks question:
What was the last ‘bulldog’ (round nose) style EMD locomotive built, and when did it enter service?

H222
July 18th, 2013, 01:29 AM
The CL/CLP/CLF class buit in south Australia. Entered service early 70s

wkwood
July 24th, 2013, 12:13 AM
If you're talking bulldog style, electric bulldogs built by ASEA (licensed by EMD) were the last running. Staring mid 1950s last were done in early 1960s. A few were running up until the mid - 90s in regular service.

ZecMurphy
July 24th, 2013, 11:11 PM
What was the last ‘bulldog’ (round nose) style EMD locomotive built, and when did it enter service?
The last ‘bulldog’ (round nose) style EMD locomotive type built was the Clyde/EMD CL class built for the Commonwealth Railways in 1970-1972, with the last being CL17, bringing an end to the construction of the EMD streamlined ‘bulldog’ style locomotives, which dated back to 1939.












This weeks question:
In what year did the first S-2 class Berkshire locomotive enter service for the New York, Chicago and St. Louis Railroad (aka, the NKP)?

JIb228
July 25th, 2013, 12:17 PM
1934 is when NKP got its S1 berks, S2's came around mid 1941 with locomotives #715-729.

ZecMurphy
August 1st, 2013, 09:21 PM
In what year did the first S-2 class Berkshire locomotive enter service for the New York, Chicago and St. Louis Railroad (aka, the NKP)?
The first NKP S-2 class Berkshire locomotive entered service in 1944.
























This weeks question:
What is the purpose of a checkrail?

JIb228
August 1st, 2013, 11:09 PM
This weeks question:
What is the purpose of a checkrail?

They are used to help guild possible derailed cars to a safer spot. Often found on bridges o other areas where a derailed car might hit some thing and cause more damage.

pga1965
August 3rd, 2013, 02:01 AM
What is the purpose of a checkrail?

check rails are mainly used on and around bridges, and on tight curves. the purpose is to prevent locos' and/or vehicles that have derailed from overturning from falling off a bridge, or causing a more major derailment while the train is moving through a tight turn. hence in both cases reducing the damage of a derailment.

big_b
August 3rd, 2013, 09:46 AM
Rails laid parallel to the main rail to guide the wheels through points. Also around bends so the flanges don't climb the rails as the taper on the wheels tend to want to climb the outer rail in the turn at these locations.
Leading & trailing edges are usually tapered or turned out to pick up ( guide )the flange as it enters & leaves the check rail.
On curves check rails only need to be on the inner rail but sometimes are seen on both.

wks
August 3rd, 2013, 06:50 PM
The purpose of the checkrail, a rail inside the main rail to maintain stability of train passing this section of the main road.. It came into being about 1825 or there about.

davidbird
August 9th, 2013, 04:37 PM
October 1976, between London Paddington and Bristol/South Wales

ZecMurphy
August 15th, 2013, 10:00 AM
What is the purpose of a checkrail?
Checkrails are placed on the inside of the running rail (the rail the wheel travels on) to help ensure that the train does not derail in high risk situations, such as on sharp curves or across bridges. They are also part of the design of most turnouts (points) where the rails cross, so as to help ensure the train follows the track.
















This weeks question:
In what year did the first Intercity 125/’HST’ train enter service, not including the prototype?

ZecMurphy
August 15th, 2013, 10:01 AM
In what year did the first Intercity 125/’HST’ train enter service, not including the prototype?
The first Intercity 125/'HST' train entered service in October 1976, with the first units being delivered in late 1975.
















This weeks question:
What is the difference between a 'top lift' and a 'bottom lift' automatic/knuckle coupler?

Zeldaboy14
August 16th, 2013, 11:13 PM
Is a top lift a Lift on the track above, and the bottom lift is the chain for the link of an engine?

Timothetoolman
August 17th, 2013, 12:11 AM
A top lift knuckle has the pin holding the connection solid and is 'lifted above" removing the pin and enabling the connection to be split. I would only assume a "bottom lift" applies to a reverse of the top lift.

Tim

jjanmarine3
August 17th, 2013, 12:36 AM
I think it is the method that the knuckle is unlocked and where the release lever is mounted.
In the top lift method the release lever or mechanism releases or unlocks the knuckle by lifting it up through the top of the coupler, and in the bottom lift method the knuckle is released or unlocked by pushing the knuckle lock pin up from the bottom through the coupler.

nicky9499
August 17th, 2013, 12:46 AM
top lift:

http://www.southernsteamtrains.com/miscpix2/2-coupler-02.jpg

bottom lift:

http://www.proto48.org/images/tips/tip_04a.jpg

pga1965
August 17th, 2013, 02:59 AM
What is the difference between a 'top lift' and a 'bottom lift' automatic/knuckle coupler?

'top lift couplers' are those most commonly used, top lift meaning the release is on the top of the coupler. A 'bottom release' coupler are used on passenger carriages, where there is a passenger connection on top of the coupler. some specialised freight wagons where low clearance is required may also have 'bottom release' couplers.(e.g. well wagons, and car carriers)

ZecMurphy
August 23rd, 2013, 12:34 AM
What is the difference between a 'top lift' and a 'bottom lift' automatic/knuckle coupler?
The difference between a ‘top lift’ and a ‘bottom lift’ automatic/knuckle coupler is the way in which the ‘pin’ (which locks the knuckle closed, and hence ‘couples’ the wagons). A ‘top lift’ coupler has the lifting mechanism to lift the pin (and release the knuckle) at the top of the coupler. A ‘bottom lift’ coupler has the lifting mechanism at the bottom of the coupler, to push the pin up and release the knuckle.
































This weeks question:
What is the purpose of ‘smoke deflectors’ when fitted to a steam locomotive?

nicky9499
August 23rd, 2013, 01:33 AM
It makes smokestack exhaust billow above and away from the sides of the engine to prevent obstructing the crew's sight.

SBLimey
August 23rd, 2013, 09:53 AM
This week's question:
What is the purpose of ‘smoke deflectors’ when fitted to a steam locomotive?


My understanding is that they help push the smoke up, rather than down along the sides of the carriages, so as to keep the carriages free of smoke, especially in tunnels.

cascaderailroad
August 23rd, 2013, 11:05 AM
It was for the cab crew especially, to lift smoke upward.

Long tunnels were always smoke filled, and some cab crews donned respirator masks, resembling molten steel mill helmets, with air tubing.

teddytoot
August 23rd, 2013, 01:30 PM
In the early part of the 20th century as boilers got fatter and funnels shorter it was found that smoke would drift down and obscure the cab and hence the driver's view. Various experiments were done to cure this problem. As each loco tended to have it's own unique problem, there was quite a variation in smoke deflector patterns. The British tended to favour flat side plates whereas the Germans went for the small wing type deflectors as seen for a while on the Flying Scotsman. A good example of seeing the difficulty of solving the problem is to look at a series of photos of the first Bulleid Merchant Navy locomotives and see how the front end changed in shape.

Saturnr
August 25th, 2013, 07:13 AM
Smoke deflectors are used to prevent drifting, to get the smoke up, instead of letting it drift and obscure the engineer's view. They help with draft. The smaller kind are called Elephant Ears, like on UP 4-6-6-4 #3977. Most engines which had the smoke deflectors were built or rebuilt/modernized during or after WWII (1940s).:D

wkwood
August 25th, 2013, 06:51 PM
The deflectors helped to channel air along the sides of the boiler. This channel of air naturally prohibited smoke and other particles of combustion from flowing down the sides of the locomotive. This especially helped visibility especially in tunnels where the escaping steam and smoke from the boiler didn't have much room to escape and would funnel around the sides of the train naturally.

ZecMurphy
September 5th, 2013, 12:14 AM
What is the purpose of ‘smoke deflectors’ when fitted to a steam locomotive?
The purpose of smoke deflectors, when fitted to a steam locomotive, is to ‘lift’ or ‘push’ the smoke and steam from the chimney up higher so as to not obscure the crew’s view out of the cab.











This weeks question:
What is the purpose of ‘interlocking’ on a signal lever frame?

nicky9499
September 5th, 2013, 12:43 AM
Interlocking prevents conflicting movements of a set of switches for safety reasons. For example, a crossover on double-track may be interlocked so that the switches can only be aligned to diverge together.

SBLimey
September 6th, 2013, 07:07 AM
What is the purpose of ‘interlocking’ on a signal lever frame?


The interlocking is to prevent the setting of conflicting signals on a single track.

ZecMurphy
September 19th, 2013, 09:18 PM
What is the purpose of ‘interlocking’ on a signal lever frame?
The purpose of interlocking, on a signal lever frame, is to prevent conflicting train movements from being permitted on signals and turnouts. For example, if you have two lines merging to one line, the signals and turnouts will be interlocked so that the signals can only be changed when the turnouts are set correctly, and so that the turnouts can only be changed when all applicable signals are set to stop.
















This weeks question:
On a steam locomotive, what is the purpose of the expansion link?

rweber95
September 21st, 2013, 02:27 PM
Interlocking also provides other safety functions, at least on the systems that I've worked.
1. The levers in the frame are sequentially numbered. To set a path you must pull a series of numbered levers and you must pull them in a specified order. The interlocking mechanism will prevent you from deviating from that sequence.
2. Once a sequence has been complete, pulling the last lever in the sequence locks that path and you can't undo it until the time lock is set and timed out. This feature prevents the tower operator from making changes in the face of an oncoming train.

Bob Weber

jjanmarine3
September 22nd, 2013, 12:28 AM
IfI remember correctly from 40 years ago... :eek:...the expansion link moves up or down positioning the valves correctly allowing steam to be admitted to the pistons for forward or reverse movement.

ZecMurphy
October 1st, 2013, 11:48 PM
On a steam locomotive, what is the purpose of the expansion link
The purpose of the expansion link on a steam locomotive is to both allow the locomotive’s direction to be reversed, and adjust the cut-off of the valves to improve performance at higher speeds. Both of these functions are achieved by moving either the expansion link or the radius rod up and down, which in turn changes the timing of the valves that admin steam into the cylinders.














This weeks question:
On a steam boiler, what is an economizer?

Bill69
October 4th, 2013, 10:45 PM
An economiser is used to increase the efficiency of a boiler to raise steam. Economisers come in various different forms, they can be as simple as a steam heated cylinder used to heat the water from the tender before it goes into the boiler.

Cheers,
Bill69

ZecMurphy
October 9th, 2013, 09:22 PM
On a steam boiler, what is an economizer?
The economizer, sometimes known as a ‘feedwater heater’ (particularly on steam locomotives), uses the exhaust gasses after they have left the boiler tubes to pre-heat the water so as to improve the fuel efficiency of the boiler, since less fuel will be required to heat the water. On steam locomotives, these use steam (either live steam or exhaust steam) to pre-heat the water.














This weeks question:
What were the names of the four streamlined steam locomotives that hauled the Spirit of Progress in Victoria??

NSWGR_46Class
October 11th, 2013, 06:44 PM
S 300 Matthew Flinders
S 301 Sir Thomas Mitchell
S 302 Edward Henty
S 303 C J La Trobe

ZecMurphy
October 16th, 2013, 11:43 PM
What were the names of the four streamlined steam locomotives that hauled the Spirit of Progress in Victoria?
The names of the four streamlined steam locomotives that hauled the Spirit of Progress were Matthew Flinders (S300), Sir Thomas Mitcheel (S301), Edward Henty (S302), and C.J.Latrobe (S303).































This weeks question:
What is the purpose of the blowdown on a steam locomotive??

JIb228
October 17th, 2013, 12:30 AM
This weeks question:
What is the purpose of the blowdown on a steam locomotive??

To allow the crew to "blowdown" the boiler, or let off all the steam in a safe manner prior to shutting down the locomotive.

MrRail
October 18th, 2013, 08:10 AM
It allows out steam and water when shutting down a boiler, but can also remove, and help prevent build ups of boiler scale.

ZecMurphy
October 24th, 2013, 08:19 PM
What is the purpose of the blowdown on a steam locomotive?
The purpose of the blowdown on a steam locomotive is to rapidly release water/steam from the lowest part of the boiler so as to ‘blow out’ sediment, and unwanted minerals.










This weeks question:
On a steam locomotive, what is the purpose of a superheater??

transitguard
October 24th, 2013, 10:46 PM
This weeks question:
On a steam locomotive, what is the purpose of a superheater??

From a thermodynamics standpoint, a superheater heats the steam out of the saturated steam region and into the superheated region of the phase diagram. When the steam is superheated, it is less likely to condense when energy is harvested from it such as when it goes through a turbine or reciprocating engine.

In practice a superheater also causes higher efficiency in most cases because it is increasing the heat transfer area between the hot combustion gases and the steam. This allows more energy to be absorbed from the burning fuel.

ZecMurphy
October 31st, 2013, 08:29 PM
On a steam locomotive, what is the purpose of a superheater?
The purpose of a superheater is to further heat the steam, using the otherwise unused heat from the exhaust gasses in the boiler. This superheated steam, being at a temperature above it’s ‘vaporisation’ point (the point it changes from water to steam - this temperature changes depending on boiler pressure), does not carry any water with it and is at a high enough temperature to not condense within the cylinders whilst the locomotive is in operation. Superheated steam also provides greater expansive energy, which will either improve the performance of the locomotive or increase it’s fuel efficiency (or both).

















This weeks question:
What is the purpose of a ‘Shelf’ coupler??

4449tj
October 31st, 2013, 09:19 PM
it is a coupler that cannot be uncoupled from another coupler from vertical motion. it has catches on the bottom and top to keep this from happening. Shelf couplers are used on ALL tank cars and also on any hazmat cars. this is so that the coupler can't puncture the tank in a derailment.
TJ

DaveL
November 1st, 2013, 08:28 AM
Yup, what he said.....except I would not use the word "cannot" or the word "can't". Having seen a wreck or two, anything is possible....."cannot & can't" are too narrow.

DaveL

nicky9499
November 1st, 2013, 09:12 AM
Sounds about right, although "reduce the chances of a coupler puncturing a tank car" would be a more appropriate description.

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7131/7717174522_115065bddc_z.jpg

This shows a concise view of how the "shelves" block off the top or bottom of the knuckles.

http://www.tc.gc.ca/media/images/tdg-eng/coupler.jpg

Cheerio,
Nicholas

ZecMurphy
November 7th, 2013, 08:47 PM
What is the purpose of a ‘Shelf’ coupler?
The purpose of a ‘Shelf’ coupler is to prevent couplers from dropping under or riding over the other coupler. The ‘bottom shelf’ is to help prevent the couplers from dropping below the other coupler and either decoupling the train or allowing wagons to impact on each other. The bottom shelf is also designed to ‘catch’ a coupler if it breaks away from the wagon, so that the coupler doesn’t end up under the train and cause a derailment. The ‘top shelf’ is to help prevent couplers riding over the top of another coupler, and is generally used on tank wagons to help prevent the coupler on another wagon riding over and puncturing the tank.

















This weeks question:
What is the name of the designer of the streamlining on the Pennsylvania Railroad’s T1 class locomotives??

SD45T-2
November 9th, 2013, 08:21 AM
Way, way too easy.

Raymond Loewy-Also did many other locomotives, including the S1, the First Streamlined K4, and FM's Road Switchers.

MrRail
November 20th, 2013, 10:57 PM
Yep, Raymond Loewy. This was also on google the other day interestingly enough.

ZecMurphy
November 22nd, 2013, 12:52 AM
What is the name of the designer of the streamlining on the Pennsylvania Railroad’s T1 class locomotives?
The name of the designer of the streamlining on the Pennsylvania Railroad’s T-1 class locomotives was Raymond Leowy.








This weeks question:
Which railway has the only currently operational Vauclain Compound steam locomotive in the world?

ronc77n
November 22nd, 2013, 10:14 PM
Welcome to the Trains Trivia of the Week thread.

Every Wednesday we will ask you a question here related to trains, and you will have a week to answer the question. Next Wednesday, we will update the previous week's answer and put in a new question again. You can use this thread to discuss your answers.

If you have a trivia question which you want to be featured in this section, email it through to trainznews@n3vgames.com along with the answer.

So you are a ferroequinologist......right? :)

Last week's answer:

The name of the designer of the streamlining on the Pennsylvania Railroad’s T-1 class locomotives was Raymond Leowy.

This week's question:
Which railway has the only currently operational Vauclain Compound locomotive in the world?

The locomotive is located at the Pikes Peak Railway, Colorado.

Nevada40
November 22nd, 2013, 10:14 PM
This weeks question:
Which railway has the only currently operational Vauclain Compound steam locomotive in the world?

That would be the Manitou and Pikes Peak Cog Railway, and their #4.

ZecMurphy
November 28th, 2013, 10:16 PM
Which railway has the only currently operational Vauclain Compound steam locomotive in the world?
The only operational Vauclain Compound locomotive in the world resides at the Manitou and Pike's Peak Railway in Colorado, USA.




This weeks question:
Which steam locomotive was used in multiple films and TV shows, including Petticoat Junction and The Virginian?

Southern1581
November 28th, 2013, 10:49 PM
Sierra Railway #3

cameronjames
December 10th, 2013, 04:57 PM
September 25, 1995

no silly it was 1939.

Saturnr
December 13th, 2013, 04:23 PM
The lempor and lemprex exhausts were created by engineer L D Porta.

ZecMurphy
January 9th, 2014, 11:08 PM
Who developed the ‘Lempor’ and ‘Lemprex’ exhaust systems for steam locomotives?
The Lempor and Lemprex exhaust systems for steam locomotives were developed by Livio Dante Porta.



This weeks question:
What is the highest railway station in the world?

flyboy559
January 10th, 2014, 12:07 AM
Tanggula Railway Station in Tibet is the highest at 16,627 feet or 5068 meters above sea level

ZecMurphy
January 23rd, 2014, 11:23 PM
What is a ‘lifting’ injector on a steam locomotive?
A lifting injector is an injector that uses steam to not only push water into the boiler, but to also ‘lift’ the water from the tank or tender when the injector is above the water level.


This weeks question:
In what country did the only ‘Davies Patent’ wooden railed railway operate?

Tracksupervisor
January 25th, 2014, 05:41 AM
The Davies Patent wooden rails were used in Australia in a little town called Mount George carting logs from the bush to a saw mill gauge was 4ft81/2in some rail was still there in 1962

BLACKWATCH
January 25th, 2014, 09:30 AM
The 'Oreti Railway' in the Province of Southland, New Zealand, was a std gauge wooden-railed railway built by Davies in the 1800's

ZecMurphy
February 5th, 2014, 10:41 PM
In what year did the Southern Aurora begin operations between Melbourne and Sydney?
The Southern Aurora began operations between Melbourne and Sydney in April 1962




This weeks question:
Which British heritage railway holds the distinction of being the only double track heritage railway in Britain?

butler57
February 5th, 2014, 10:50 PM
The GCR - Great Central Railway is the UK’s only double track, main line heritage railway. It’s the only place in the world where full size steam engines can be seen passing each other.

gary.stevens
February 6th, 2014, 06:39 PM
I believe it's the Great Central Railway in Loughborough, Leitcestershire.
Gary Stevens NZ

Corky_Bantam
February 8th, 2014, 04:12 AM
Yes the Great Central Railway. Or, more accurate a section of it. I believe that they are in the process of building a new bridge to join two sections together. The railway is also used by network rail for testing purposes.

BLACKWATCH
February 8th, 2014, 08:53 AM
Zec, we seem to have a BIG lump missing between #156 & #157 :confused:

SteamSeeker
February 9th, 2014, 08:18 AM
The Great Central Railway in Leicestershire

Bhorton
February 10th, 2014, 05:08 PM
A bit late, but Great Central Railway. (I think that they are getting a single line branch)

ZecMurphy
February 13th, 2014, 09:02 PM
Which British heritage railway holds the distinction of being the only double track heritage railway in Britain?
The British heritage railway that holds the distinction of being the only double track heritage railway in Britain is the Great Central Railway, between Loughborough and Rothley (single track then continues on to Liecester North).






This weeks question:
In what year did the Fowler 0-10-0 ‘banking’ locomotive no2290 (also known as ‘Big Bertha’) begin operation?

BLACKWATCH
February 14th, 2014, 05:43 AM
She was built in 1919, ran her first trial on Jan 1st 1920 & comenced operations the same year, 1920.

Ref: 'Fowler Locomotives' by Brian Haresnape, published by Ian Allen 1972

pcas1986
February 14th, 2014, 06:45 AM
She was built in 1919, ran her first trial on Jan 1st 1920 & comenced operations the same year, 1920.

Ref: 'Fowler Locomotives' by Brian Haresnape, published by Ian Allen 1972
You beat me to it. And my version of it with MR, LMS and BR livery can be found on the DLS. I do have some minor updates when I can find time to finish them off.

mineminx
February 17th, 2014, 02:01 PM
1920. Also, Big Bertha was an 'Anderson' locomotive built in Derby and not a 'Fowler' locomotive.

BLACKWATCH
February 17th, 2014, 04:30 PM
1920. Also, Big Bertha was an 'Anderson' locomotive built in Derby and not a 'Fowler' locomotive.

That is true, Anderson did design the loco, as he was a draughtsman at Derby, he was also acting CME between 1915 and 1919 when Fowler was away on war work, however, the important word is highlighted, so the loco is still classed as a 'Fowler', because it was built under Fowlers reign as CME for the Midland. 1909--1923

ZecMurphy
March 5th, 2014, 10:09 PM
Which British heritage railway regularly featured in the drama Heartbeat, as well as in several of the Harry Potter films?
The British heritage railway that regularly featured in the drama Heartbeat, as well as in several of the Harry Potter films, was the North Yorkshire Moors Railway.










This weeks question:
What was the last steam operated railway to be operated on the British Railways network, prior to privatisation?

BLACKWATCH
March 6th, 2014, 03:33 AM
The British heritage railway that regularly featured in the drama Heartbeat, as well as in several of the Harry Potter films, was the North Yorkshire Moors Railway.

That may well have been "last weeks question", but you didn't post it on here. :n:


This weeks question:
What was the last steam operated railway to be operated on the British Railways network, prior to privatisation?

This is the second time in a row that I have answered a question & you have done this, you did it Feb 6th, so how about forgetting
this one ( the answer is The Vale of Rheidol Railway as it happens ) & giving the answer to the last one we all saw on Feb 14th ?

Timothetoolman
March 6th, 2014, 04:16 AM
What's you problem? You get aggravated over the silliest of things, taking harmless little mistakes a personal slights. I can't even see what your complaining about:n:

Tim

BLACKWATCH
March 6th, 2014, 09:48 AM
What's you problem? You get aggravated over the silliest of things, taking harmless little mistakes a personal slights. I can't even see what your complaining about:n:

Tim

My point is, why run something like this if you're not going to run it properly ?
You might like living in a slap dash world where people can't be bothered, but this is the sort
of attitude that's got the world in the sorry mess it's in.

As for me making it a "a personal slight", where do you get that from ?
All I stated was that both times I've posted on here, it's happened, for all I know it's also happened a few times before.

Maybe it's different in "the land of Ooo", but most of us live in the real world. :n:

nicky9499
March 6th, 2014, 10:00 AM
Yes yes, it's all slap dash in the land of Ooo and everything is a sorry mess, N3V can't possibly go on for much longer like this so perhaps we should hand everything over to someone living in the real world. Someone like you perhaps Mr. Bolshy Yorkshireman.

BLACKWATCH
March 6th, 2014, 03:58 PM
Yes yes, it's all slap dash in the land of Ooo and everything is a sorry mess, N3V can't possibly go on for much longer like this so perhaps we should hand everything over to someone living in the real world. Someone like you perhaps Mr. Bolshy Yorkshireman.

And who rattled your bloody cage ?

As far as you & timthetool are concerned, my post was addressing Zec, it has nothing to do with you pair of trolls, so 'wind yer necks in'.

AMTRAKwannabe
March 6th, 2014, 04:02 PM
I think you're the troll here. :n:

ZecMurphy
March 6th, 2014, 07:23 PM
Good Morning All
Unfortunately, it does appear that I missed a couple of trivia posts. We do apologize for any inconvenience caused by not posting it here (note, the question at answer are included in the newsletter), and in future if one is missed I'll try to ensure that at a minimum I make a separate post before the 'current' trivia post to show the question/answer.

Regards

teddytoot
March 7th, 2014, 04:24 AM
Good Morning All
....(note, the question at answer are included in the newsletter)...
Regards
That would be OK but MANY OF US WHO ARE SIGNED UP STILL DO NOT GET THE NEWSLETTER. Yes I am shouting!

BLACKWATCH
March 7th, 2014, 04:55 AM
Thank you Zec.



I think you're the troll here. :n:
It's got nothing to do with you either (as if I give a damn what a Classic Idiot thinks).

peterwise
March 7th, 2014, 07:33 AM
Enough children!

This is supposed to be fun remember!

Peter.

puffernutter
March 7th, 2014, 08:10 AM
That would be the Vale of Rheidol Railway, narrow gauge, from Aberystwyth to Devils Bridge, in mid Wales

ZecMurphy
March 11th, 2014, 10:55 PM
What was the last steam operated railway to be operated on the British Railways network, prior to privatisation.
The last steam operated railway to be operated on the British Railways network, prior to privatisation, was the Vale of Rheidol Railway in Wales.











This weeks question:
In what year did the Roaring Camp & Big Trees Railroad begin operation?

FallonBill2
March 16th, 2014, 01:16 PM
[QUOTE=ZecMurphy;1053785]
Welcome to the Trains Trivia of the Week thread.

Every Wednesday we will ask you a question here related to trains, and you will have a week to answer the question. Next Wednesday, we will update the previous week's answer and put in a new question again. You can use this thread to discuss your answers.

If you have a trivia question which you want to be featured in this section, email it through to trainznews@n3vgames.com along with the answer.

So you are a ferroequinologist......right? :)

Last week's answer:

The last steam operated railway to be operated on the British Railways network, prior to privatisation, was the Vale of Rheidol Railway in Wales.

This week's question:
In what year did the Roaring Camp & Big Trees Railroad begin operating?


]Around 1960 I think - if this is the one near Santa Cruz CA.

ZecMurphy
March 19th, 2014, 08:47 PM
In what year did the Roaring Camp & Big Trees Railroad begin operation?
The last steam operated railway to be operated on the British Railways network, prior to privatisation, was the Vale of Rheidol Railway in Wales.











This weeks question:
What is the common nickname for a steam locomotive with a 2-6-2 wheel arrangement?

Timothetoolman
March 19th, 2014, 09:50 PM
Prarie (10 whatevers)

Tim

nicky9499
March 19th, 2014, 10:04 PM
Prairie :hehe:

judahGrice
March 24th, 2014, 04:11 PM
Prairie... :confused:

CheekyBugger
March 26th, 2014, 12:24 AM
How about you stop posting trivia questions that only Americans would know the answer to? There are a LOT of us out here who are NOT American. Trainz is not even American. I mean, come on.

CheekyBugger
March 26th, 2014, 12:30 AM
Okay, I'm tired of having my posts deleted on me all the time. What is up with that? I didn't say anything bad in the last one. Holy cow!

cascaderailroad
March 26th, 2014, 02:37 AM
I used to think that I knew somethings about trains ... but it turns out ... The more I know ... The more I don't know !

I just learned this week that, "Long Hood Running" was due to RR's needing to have the one person crew (engineer only) to sit on the right side of the long hood, and that he be able to read trackside signals, that are on the right side of the rail line (especially in switching operations and coal service runs).

Sourdough
March 26th, 2014, 06:05 PM
How about you stop posting trivia questions that only Americans would know the answer to? There are a LOT of us out here who are NOT American. Trainz is not even American. I mean, come on.

Why would only Americans know the answer to the British Railway question? You might want to read the past trivia questions as soon as you manage to unbind your undies.....:cool:


Okay, I'm tired of having my posts deleted on me all the time. What is up with that?

I imagine a lot of non-Americans could answer that one....

sparky15
March 26th, 2014, 06:18 PM
I think his comments in the hump yard screenshot competition were his high point myself

ZecMurphy
March 26th, 2014, 10:53 PM
What is the common nickname for a steam locomotive with a 2-6-2 wheel arrangement?
The common nickname for a steam locomotive with a 2-6-2 wheel arrangement is a ‘Prairie’ locomotive.










This weeks question:
Which two Victorian Railways locomotives hauled the last train on the Lilydale to Warburton line?



As a note, I try to vary between generic and country specific topics for the trivia each week. As it is, the last few have tended more towards generic or British based topics. The last one, on the Prairie locos, was actually inspired by the GWR's 'Prairie Tank' locomotives, and Puffing Billy's 2-6-2T Baldwin's (well, based on Baldwin's). This weeks is Australian. If anyone does have trivia suggestions, they are free to PM me or contact the email address in the first post. It does get pretty hard to come up with fresh railway trivia questions after nearly 2 years...

tbundy1982
April 4th, 2014, 03:40 PM
I just learned this week that, "Long Hood Running" was due to RR's needing to have the one person crew (engineer only) to sit on the right side of the long hood, and that he be able to read trackside signals, that are on the right side of the rail line (especially in switching operations and coal service runs).

I've read a number of theories on this topic, and I've never heard that one before. I assume you are referring to North America? I have equated "Long hood Running" with the long-hood forward running, or what appears to be a diesel engine running backwards. Forgive me if I misunderstood.


One theory is that early diesel manufacturers designed the first generation locomotives with cabs at the rear to mimic the shape of steam locomotives, therefore providing engine crews some familiarity with the operating environment and some comfort in being protected in the event of a front-end collision.

Going against your statement about one-person crews, running a locomotive long-hood forward actually hindered the engineer's ability to operate alone, with nearly no visibility around left-hand curves. There was some unrest at that time within the engineers union about the recent lack of necessity of the fireman. Producing new road-switchers with limited visibility probably helped secure the fireman's job for years. This way of thinking changed by the late 1950's, and, due to crew safety (visibility), short hood diesels began to become the standard.

The N&W and Southern Railway both ordered locomotives with high short hoods, designated long-hood forward, well into the 1970's. SOU units were purely long hood forward, while N&W units commonly had dual controls so the engineer could sit on either side. This practice of running long-hood forward eventually faded, and several Class 1 railroads have a rule that states if turning facilities are available a train may not leave the terminal with the long hood forward.

I have run both high-hood geeps and an RS-3 and the visibility issue is very apparent. EMD switchers are not as bad, because you sit a little higher than the top of the hood.


Back to the topic: What two railroads merged in 1980 to form CSX? I'll give it a go, without any fact checking to keep it fair. Be warned, the information below could be complete BS. I'm going off the top of my head...

The first thing that comes to mind are the Chessie System and Seaboard System, but that happened a few years later, IIRC. The Seaboard didn't gather the Family Lines together til 1982, I think. The Chessie System was also a loosely connected group of railroads that chose to cooperate rather than merge in the wake of the merger difficulties in the 1960's. The C&O was the dominant party I believe. I think they finally combined all the railroads (B&O, C&O, WM) around 1980. My guess is the Baltimore & Ohio and Chesapeake & Ohio...final answer.

Edit: I got it wrong... :( The overall idea is correct, but there is a detail in the merger that better suits the question. Good luck!

Tyler

ZecMurphy
April 8th, 2014, 09:52 PM
Which two Victorian Railways locomotives hauled the last train on the Lilydale to Warburton line?
The two Victorian Railways locomotives that hauled the last train on the Lilydale to Warburton line were D3 639, and K166.









This weeks question:
Which two railroads merged in 1980 to form CSX Corporation?

ZecMurphy
April 8th, 2014, 09:54 PM
Which two railroads merged in 1980 to form CSX Corporation?
The two railroads that merged in the 1980s to form CSX Corporation were the Chessie System and Seaboard System Railroad.














This weeks question:
In what year did the Khyber Pass Railway begin operating?

gremlin1812
April 8th, 2014, 11:55 PM
G'day,
The Khyber Pass railway experienced the ups-and-downs of the times. It was built as strategic line to thwart any Afghan or Russian invasion of India. The railway was officially opened on 3 November 1925 during the British raj in India. The wife of Victor Bailey, the engineer who was assigned the construction of the line, had previously driven the first train into Landi Kotal.


After independence of Pakistan in 1947 a weekly train was started between Peshawar and Landi Kotal, running every Sunday. Train operations were stopped in 1982, as the railway was not commercially viable. However, in the 1990s, a tourist train, the Khyber train safari, was launched by a private enterprise in collaboration with Pakistan Railways. It was closed in 2006 after a flood washed away railway track and bridges.
Regards
Barrie

ZecMurphy
April 15th, 2014, 09:53 PM
In what year did the Khyber Pass Railway begin operating?
The Khyber Pass Railway began operations in 1925.










This weeks question:
Which of the Darjeeling Himalayan Railway B class steam locomotives now resides in the United Kingdom?

captainkman
April 15th, 2014, 10:06 PM
It is DHR #778. She's the only B class to ever be taken out of India. She's based at a private railway but is sometimes run on other lines such as the Ffestiniog.

Kieran.

TheGameMelon
April 21st, 2014, 08:09 PM
DHR #778 .

ZecMurphy
April 23rd, 2014, 10:54 PM
Which of the Darjeeling Himalayan Railway B class steam locomotives now resides in the United Kingdom?
The Darjeeling Himalayan Railway B class steam locomotives which now resides in the United Kingdom is DHR no 778.






This weeks question:
In what year did preserved Canadian National Railways steam locomotive 6060 enter service?

gremlin1812
April 23rd, 2014, 11:28 PM
Canadian National Railway steam locomotive 6060 "The Spirit of Alberta" was assembled in Canada's Montreal Locomotive Works in October 1944. Initially used on short freight runs in central Canada, the 6060 was assigned in 1945 to the prestigious continent-wide passenger excursions. Its sleek design, emphasized by its conical nose and running boards, and its capacity to travel great distances without being spelled off, made it ideal for passenger traffic. In the mid-1950s, it was converted from coal to fuel oil. Retired from active service in the early 1960s.

Barrie

ZecMurphy
May 1st, 2014, 12:11 AM
In what year did preserved Canadian National Railways steam locomotive 6060 enter service?
Preserved Canadian National Railways steam locomotive 6060 entered service in 1944.





This weeks question:
For what purpose was the London and South Western Railway’s (LSWR) one-off F9 class locomotive number 733 (nicknamed ‘The Bug’) built for?

captainkman
May 1st, 2014, 12:22 AM
It was built as a self-propelled inspection car.

Kieran.

teddytoot
May 1st, 2014, 03:38 AM
It was built for Dugald Drummond in 1899 as an inspection car. After his death in 1912 his successor Urie had no use for it and it was transferred to service stock in 1913. It was renumbered to 58S in 1924. The only further use made of it was in 1932 when it was used to haul an ex-SECR six-wheeled coach around Southampton docks to show visiting parties the construction of the New (now Western) Docks. It was then stored at Eastleigh and condemned in 1940.

ZecMurphy
May 8th, 2014, 11:42 PM
For what purpose was the London and South Western Railway’s (LSWR) one-off F9 class locomotive number 733 (nicknamed ‘The Bug’) built for?
The London and South Western Railway’s one-off ‘F9’ class locomotive, number 733 (nicknamed ‘The Bug’) was built as Dugald Drummond's ‘Inspection Cab’/personal rail transport on the LSWR during his time as both Locomotive Superintendent and Running Superintendent.




This weeks question:
Which Australian steam locomotive was given the nickname ‘Healthy Hilda’ (among other nicknames)?

trainman7616
May 9th, 2014, 12:17 AM
H220 "Heavy Harry" 4-8-4 (Healthy Hilda)

ZecMurphy
May 13th, 2014, 09:32 PM
Which Australian steam locomotive was given the nickname ‘Healthy Hilda’ (among other nicknames)?
The Australian steam locomotive given the nickname ‘Healthy Hilda’ was the Victorian Railways H class #220, otherwise known as ‘Heavy Harry’ by railway enthusiasts.




This weeks question:
What was the last steam locomotive to run at over 100MPH (160KM/H), and when was this run undertaken?

ZecMurphy
May 22nd, 2014, 08:57 PM
What was the last steam locomotive to run at over 100MPH (160KM/H), and when was this run undertaken?

The last steam locomotive to run at over 100MPH (160KM/H) was DR 18 201, on the 5th of May 2002.







This weeks question:
Which steam locomotive is seen in O. Winston Link’s photograph ‘Eastbound Hotshot’?

AMTRAKwannabe
May 22nd, 2014, 10:27 PM
NVM, counted the wheels, all I know now is it's a 2-6-6-4...

pcas1986
May 23rd, 2014, 02:36 AM
Looks rather like a N&W 2-6-6-4 Class A but I don't know much about U.S. locos. What a great photo! A train, aircraft (on the screen) (Sabre jet?) and 1950's cars.

I miss Drive Ins. Youtube doesn't have the same attraction.

flyboy559
May 23rd, 2014, 11:36 AM
It was N&W Class A #1242

ZecMurphy
May 28th, 2014, 11:24 PM
Which steam locomotive is seen in O. Winston Link’s photograph ‘Eastbound Hotshot’?

The steam locomotive seen in O. Winston Link’s photograph ‘Eastbound Hotshot’ is Norfolk and Western A class #1242.






This weeks question:
What is the purpose of the ‘damper’ on a steam locomotive?

Zeldaboy14
May 28th, 2014, 11:41 PM
To keep the engine cool if it gets too hot.

Bill69
May 28th, 2014, 11:43 PM
The damper on a steam loco is the same as a damper on any fire, it slows down the burn rate.

Cheers,
Bill69

racefanwfo
May 30th, 2014, 01:20 AM
the damper is a valve which controls the fire by regulating the amount of air that can reach the fire.

dalesaylor
May 30th, 2014, 05:53 AM
The damper is used to adjust how much air/oxygen is fed to the fuel in the engine.



Welcome to the Trains Trivia of the Week thread.

Every Wednesday we will ask you a question here related to trains, and you will have a week to answer the question. Next Wednesday, we will update the previous week's answer and put in a new question again. You can use this thread to discuss your answers.

If you have a trivia question which you want to be featured in this section, email it through to trainznews@n3vgames.com along with the answer.

So you are a ferroequinologist......right? :)

Last week's answer:

The steam locomotive seen in O. Winston Link’s photograph ‘Eastbound Hotshot’ is Norfolk and Western A class #1242.

This week's question:
What is the purpose of the ‘damper’ on a steam locomotive?

ZecMurphy
June 4th, 2014, 07:58 PM
What is the purpose of the ‘damper’ on a steam locomotive?

The purpose of the ‘damper’ on a steam locomotive is to control the flow of air into the firebox, through the firebed, which in turn allows the fireman to control the fire by reducing the oxygen available to be burned.





This weeks question:
What does the acronym ‘MU’ mean in relation to diesel locomotives?

judahGrice
June 4th, 2014, 08:23 PM
The purpose of the ‘damper’ on a steam locomotive is to control the flow of air into the firebox, through the firebed, which in turn allows the fireman to control the fire by reducing the oxygen available to be burned.





This weeks question:
What does the acronym ‘MU’ mean in relation to diesel locomotives?
M=Multiple U=Units. MU=Multiple Units.

benjaminw
June 7th, 2014, 06:41 PM
Multiple unit

ZecMurphy
June 12th, 2014, 10:26 PM
What does the acronym ‘MU’ mean in relation to diesel locomotives?
In relation to diesel locomotives, the acronym ‘MU’ means multiple unit’. This is the system that allows multiple diesel locomotives to be electrically coupled to allow one crew to operate all locomotives together.








This weeks question:
Which company built the single cylinder locomotive used at the Nether Heyford Brickworks tramway in the United Kingdom?

Bill69
June 12th, 2014, 11:54 PM
I think that would have to be Aveling & Porter. A single cylinder 0-4-0 that was modified from a traction engine design.

Cheers,
Bill69

ZecMurphy
June 18th, 2014, 10:10 PM
Which company built the single cylinder locomotive used at the Nether Heyford Brickworks tramway in the United Kingdom?
The company that built the single cylinder locomotive used at the Nether Heyford Brickworks tramway in the United Kingdom was Aveling and Porter.







This weeks question:
Which preserved Australian steam locomotive turns 100 years old on the 25th of June 2014?

ZecMurphy
July 1st, 2014, 08:54 PM
Which preserved Australian steam locomotive turns 100 years old on the 25th of June 2014?
The preserved Australian steam locomotive that turned 100 years old was Puffing Billy’s NA class locomotive 14A, which entered service on the 25th of June 1914.






This weeks question:
Which Australian politician attended the launch of Trainz in December 2001?

ZecMurphy
July 1st, 2014, 08:56 PM
Which Australian politician attended the launch of Trainz in December 2001?
The Australian Politician who attended the launch of Trainz in December 2001 was Peter Beattie.










This weeks question:
What type of boiler was originally used on the LNER’s sole ‘W1’ class locomotive?

flyboy559
July 1st, 2014, 10:42 PM
A high pressure water tube boiler

ZecMurphy
July 9th, 2014, 10:59 PM
What type of boiler was originally used on the LNER’s sole ‘W1’ class locomotive?
The type of boiler that was originally used on the LNER’s sole ‘W1’ class locomotive was a high pressure water-tube boiler.


















This weeks question:
Which Australian passenger train became known as Australia’s Wonder Train?

Puffingbilly
July 10th, 2014, 04:21 AM
Spirit of Progress!!

judahGrice
July 10th, 2014, 10:38 PM
spirit of progress, was known as "the wonder train"

EDIT: just realized the post above this!

lrh1701
July 11th, 2014, 02:25 AM
Hi all been away catching up on life with my grandchildren, also trying out Trainsim from Steam, and i am glad to say that I will soon be purchasing the new trainz setup........in a boxset i think??

ZecMurphy
July 17th, 2014, 12:24 AM
Which Australian passenger train became known as Australia’s Wonder Train?
The Australian passenger train that became known as Australia’s Wonder Train was the Spirit of Progress.

















This weeks question:
What was the American company ‘lunkenheimer’ known for making for railway (and other) applications?

gp792
July 17th, 2014, 03:12 AM
Lunkenheimer made whistles, especially for locomotives.

gattka504
July 23rd, 2014, 02:59 PM
bronze and iron valves, including whistles

ZecMurphy
July 24th, 2014, 08:52 PM
What was the American company ‘lunkenheimer’ known for making for railway (and other) applications?
The American company ‘Lunkenheimer’ was known for making steam whistles and valves for railway (and other) applications.






This weeks question:
Which Australian steam locomotive turned 125 years old on the 24th of July 2014?

Puffingbilly
July 26th, 2014, 02:39 AM
Steamrail Victoria's Y112

ZecMurphy
July 30th, 2014, 08:46 PM
The Australian steam locomotive that turned 125 years old on the 24th of July 2014 was ex Victorian Railways locomotive Y112.
Which Australian steam locomotive turned 125 years old on the 24th of July 2014?





This weeks question:
How many NGG16 locomotives are currently operational at the Welsh Highlands Railway in the UK?

Enzo1
July 30th, 2014, 10:37 PM
This weeks question:
How many NGG16 locomotives are currently operational at the Welsh Highlands Railway in the UK?
I would say 4 according to my research

Timothetoolman
July 31st, 2014, 01:12 AM
AFAIK 4, 3 owned by the WHR and 1 privately owned.

Tim

ZecMurphy
August 6th, 2014, 10:40 PM
How many NGG16 locomotives are currently operational at the Welsh Highlands Railway in the UK?
There are three NGG16 locomotives currently operational at the Welsh Highlands Railway.




This weeks question:
Which railway was the worlds first preserved railway?

Enzo1
August 7th, 2014, 12:50 AM
I would say that it is the:
Talyllyn Railway

ZecMurphy
August 14th, 2014, 08:31 PM
Which railway was the worlds first preserved railway?
The worlds first preserved railway was the Talyllyn Railway, which was taken over for preservation in 1951.



This weeks question:
When did New Zealand’s first steam railway begin operation?

Bill69
August 14th, 2014, 08:44 PM
snip


This weeks question:
When did New Zealand’s first steam railway begin operation?

Canterbury Provincial Railway 1863

Bill69

loconutter40
August 15th, 2014, 03:35 AM
1863 and operated between Christchurch and Ferrymead.

ZecMurphy
August 20th, 2014, 10:27 PM
When did New Zealand’s first steam railway begin operation?
New Zealand’s first steam railway began operation in 1863.



This weeks question:
Which version of Trainz introduced interactive passenger stations?

Bill69
August 20th, 2014, 11:24 PM
snip
This weeks question:
Which version of Trainz introduced interactive passenger stations?

TRS2004

Bill69

Tim788
August 22nd, 2014, 01:59 AM
The first version of Trainz to have interactive passenger stations was Trainz Railroad Simulator 2004 released in September 2003 which also introduced interactive industries and wagons

ZecMurphy
August 26th, 2014, 09:46 PM
Which version of Trainz introduced interactive passenger stations?
Interactive passenger stations were introduced in Trainz Railroad Simulator 2004’s Service Pack 2 (also known as the “Passenger Pack”).


This weeks question:
In what year was the Lithgow Zig Zag railway bypassed by the ‘10 Tunnels Deviation’?

Bill69
August 26th, 2014, 11:52 PM
[QUOTE=snip
This weeks question:
In what year was the Lithgow Zig Zag railway bypassed by the ‘10 Tunnels Deviation’?[/QUOTE]

The Lithgow Zig Zag Railway was bypassed by tunnels in 1910.

Bill69

ZecMurphy
September 3rd, 2014, 11:46 PM
In what year was the Lithgow Zig Zag railway bypassed by the ‘10 Tunnels Deviation’?
The ‘10 Tunnels Deviation’, which bypassed the Lithgow Zig Zag railway, opened on the 16th of October 1910.

This weeks question:
What articulated locomotive design was Beyer, Peacock, and Company well known for producing?

narrowgauge
September 3rd, 2014, 11:56 PM
The Garratt

ZecMurphy
September 11th, 2014, 10:53 PM
What articulated locomotive design was Beyer, Peacock, and Company well known for producing?
The articulated locomotive design that Beyer, Peacock, and Company was well known for producing was the Garratt locomotive.

This weeks question:
Which locomotive in the USA is considered the smallest Standard Gauge pacific type steam locomotive in the world?