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View Full Version : Big Boy Challenger



jjanmarine3
March 25th, 2012, 04:30 AM
Hi guys, will this steam loco ever be available from trainz DLS, or is there a way of DL it . I need it to pull more than 20000 tons up the hill from Avery please !

gearhead2578
March 25th, 2012, 05:29 AM
The UP Big Boy (4006) is already around. The challenger (3985), IIRC, I've seen as payware - but it was only available for older versions. In fact UP 4006 (the Big Boy) is built in on TS2010 and 12..... A little look through your locos and maybe a quick trip through google would save you the nail biting suspense of waiting for a response from here :)

jjanmarine3
March 25th, 2012, 06:42 AM
The UP Big Boy (4006) is already around. The challenger (3985), IIRC, I've seen as payware - but it was only available for older versions. In fact UP 4006 (the Big Boy) is built in on TS2010 and 12..... A little look through your locos and maybe a quick trip through google would save you the nail biting suspense of waiting for a response from here :)

I have Big Boy yes, just looking for the bigger brother.

505657j
March 25th, 2012, 10:45 AM
the big boy had no real big brother but trainz italia built bigger ones that are not realistic, but are great to have

jjanmarine3
March 25th, 2012, 12:14 PM
Thanks Jeremiah.
I extracted the following from TrainzItalia for interest sake : " It seems that the “Huge Boy” denomination comes from a sign penciled on the basic project. Unfortunately the sign was made with a copying pencil, and it was not possible to erase it, so this monster went down to history with this name. The prototype was built in 1943-44 and began its service on the lines starting from Cheyenne, hauling very heavy trains with ease.
The effects on its passage on the rails, however, were devastating. After the passage of the Huge Boy, a dedicated MoW train followed its train with the specific duty of fixing broken rail joints and tightening loose tie plates.
This problem made the use of this monster highly uneconomic, even for a rich company such as Union Pacific. The Huge Boy was gradually relegated to helper duty on some very steep but absolutely straight routes. In late 1946, as war traffic declined, Union Pacific decided to retire the beast and to use it as a source of spare parts for the smaller Big Boys.

bendorsey
March 25th, 2012, 01:00 PM
Paulz Trainz USA offers a Challenger (4-6-6-4) as payware. His rates are quite reasonable.

Ben

wreeder
March 25th, 2012, 01:25 PM
I think after checking out this site you will find that the Italians are having a bit of fun. Union Pacific never ran a "Hugh Boy" but some railroads ran a loco just as big.

http://www.steamlocomotive.com/misc/largest.shtml

William

bendorsey
March 25th, 2012, 01:36 PM
The Erie Triplex had 3 sets of drivers as does the Huge Boy but not all under the boiler.

Something I've always been curious about concerning the Huge Boy (4-8-8-8-4)is how drivers pivot. The Big Boy (4-8-8-4) had the rear set attached to the boiler with the front set pivoting under the front of the boiler (std for US articulateds). My question concerning the Huge Boy is which set is attached to the frame? It makes a difference. if its the rear set and both front sets pivot under the boiler and boiler overhang on curves would be twice as much as it would if it was the center set that was attached to the boiler with the front and rear sets swiveling. You can wipe out a lot of fence posts and telephone poles if both front sets swivel, lol. Any one know?

Thanks,

Ben

wreeder
March 25th, 2012, 03:42 PM
Hi Ben,

I just checked and there is no swing at all on any of the driver sets. It is as if they are all mounted on a rigid frame. In a curve, the leading truck and the first set of drivers stay on the rails but the second and third set of drivers come off the rails to the inside of the curve. The trailing truck stays on the rails.

William

jjanmarine3
March 25th, 2012, 04:02 PM
I checked out that site thanks William and ended up finding much more info and after about two hours I came to the conclusion that there are and were many more steam monsters out there than most of us realise and many arguments about who's was the biggest and strongest....there is talk about a steam locomotive that one could fit Big Boy's boiler inside of it.

Ben, I don't know how the setup worked but yes no wonder the tracks were stressed out after a trip...also I did my time on steam as a fitter and I am glad I never had to work on the steam pipes and joints and smoke boxes of these giants...the SAR (file://\\sar) GL garret was bad enough...

tariacuri
March 25th, 2012, 05:54 PM
I don't know what was connected to what but I can tell you that the DMIR was able to get Yellowstones and tenders into the Mallet stalls at Proctor (which were added to facilitate lage engines post WWII - and which the CN just dismantled cause they had flat roofs and were a disaster - a flat roof in Minnesota?), But . . . there is no info on how they really did it. I have a plan view and can't figure it out. The tenders were more trouble to move around from the literature. In Superior and other spots related roads added huge 'Y' tracks to turn them.