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shadowarrior
March 21st, 2012, 12:05 AM
Welcome to the Trains Trivia of the Week thread.

Every Wednesday we will ask you a question here related to trains, and you will have a week to answer the question. Next Wednesday, we will update the previous week's answer and put in a new question again. You can use this thread to discuss your answers.

If you have a trivia question which you want to be featured in this section, email it through to trainznews@n3vgames.com along with the answer.

So you are a ferroequinologist......right? :)

Last week's answer:

The Central Railroad of New Jersey (CNJ) began operating it’s Blue Comet service in February 1929.

This week's question:
As part of the 75th anniversary celebrations for Mallard’s setting of the record for fastest steam locomotive, two A4 locomotives will return to the United Kingdom for the celbrations. What are the names and numbers of these locomotives, and where are they coming from?

Bill69
March 21st, 2012, 03:11 AM
April 1856. Ran from Adelaide to Port Adelaide.

Bill69

CRO
March 21st, 2012, 04:37 AM
1854, when the first steam railway between Melbourne and Port Melbourne started.

Bob (CRO)

big_b
March 21st, 2012, 05:55 AM
1854 September 12th
Melbourne & Hobsons Bay railway with a locally constructed locomotive

Dave

Roy3b3
March 21st, 2012, 06:50 AM
The first railway to operate in Australia was a locally manufactured steam locomotive, which ran from Flinders Street Melbourne in Victoria to Sandridge (Port Melbourne) on 12th September 1854.

Roy B

Kris94
March 23rd, 2012, 02:50 AM
On June 1, 1999 Conrail was split between Norfolk Southern and CSX. 42 percent to CSX and 58 percent to Norfolk Southern.

BLACKWATCH
March 23rd, 2012, 04:41 AM
On June 1, 1999 Conrail was split between Norfolk Southern and CSX. 42 percent to CSX and 58 percent to Norfolk Southern.

It would help if you actually read the opening post :o.

As to the question in hand, I concur with Bob (CRO), I have the same info.

ex-railwayman
March 23rd, 2012, 11:12 AM
I would agree with all the posts of our learned experts from Australia, in other words, I couldn't find anything on t'internet to contradict their claim.......:hehe:

cheerz. ex-railwayman.

shadowarrior
March 28th, 2012, 01:40 AM
Good answer guys :)
As identified by a lot of users here, last week's answer was: 12th of September 1854 between Melbourne (Flinders Street) and Sandridge (now Port Melbourne) in Victoria (Australia).

Will be updating the first post soon with this week's question.

captainkman
March 28th, 2012, 02:07 AM
The regulator admits steam into the cylinders.

Bill69
March 28th, 2012, 02:13 AM
Snip{This week's question:

What is the function of the ‘regulator’ in a steam locomotive?}

The regulator adjusts the amount of steam allowed into the steamchest, i.e. works like a throttle on a car.

Cheers,
Bill69

BobCass
March 28th, 2012, 12:12 PM
I agree with Bill69..

boyerm25
March 29th, 2012, 08:57 AM
It changes the speed.

Jananton
March 29th, 2012, 02:08 PM
What is the function of the ‘regulator’ in a steam locomotive?
Hmm, the regulator is the device situated in the steamengine cabin that can set the regulator valve. This valve, most of the time, is situated on top of the kettle in a so called steam dome. The valve regulates the amount of steam that passes from its collection point the dome, to, depending on the type of engine, either a superheater first, or the steamchest directly.

Greetings from nighttime Amsterdam,

Jan

jmehl77
March 31st, 2012, 07:33 PM
is it not to control the speed in which the locomotive keeps a constant speed

shadowarrior
April 3rd, 2012, 02:16 AM
Correct. :)

The function of the ‘regulator’ is to regulate the amount of steam being supplied to the ‘steam chest’. This then goes to the cyinders via the valves, which control the timing and amount of steam permitted into the cylinders.

big_b
April 3rd, 2012, 02:57 AM
Loco anti skid
Used to control & maintain brake pressure by exhausting when req'd on long down grades when in dynamic braking to stop wheel slip

LordSven
April 4th, 2012, 11:27 AM
Welcome to the Trains Trivia of the Week thread.

Every Wednesday we will ask you a question here related to trains, and you will have a week to answer the question. Next Wednesday, we will update the previous week's answer and put in a new question again. You can use this thread to discuss your answers.

If you have a trivia question which you want to be featured in this section, email it through to trainznews@n3vgames.com along with the answer.

So you are a ferroequinologist......right? :)

Last week's answer:

The function of the 'regulator' is to regulate the amount of steam being supplied to the 'steam chest'. This then goes to the cylinders via the valves, which control the timing and amount of steam permitted into the cylinders.

This week's question:

What is the function of the 'bail' control/valve on a locomotive?

The Bail Off control releases the brakes on the locomotive. When you use the train brake with a long train it takes a while for the brakes on the cars to come on, the brakes on the locomotive apply much faster. This can cause the weight of the train to push a car near the front of the train into derailment. By releasing (or 'Bailing off') the brakes on the locomotive you release the pressure at the front and let the cars drag the train to a stop from the rear. It's also useful if you need to stop the train while climbing a grade, you want to keep the the train stretched out and avoid 'bunching up' the consist as you go uphill so you would make an application with the train brake and bail off the locomotive. You would also keep some throttle on and as the train is dragged to a stop apply the locomotive brake to full apply some more train brake and cut the power. Same when you start again. Apply power, release the loco brake, bail off, and then release the train brake.

(I took this explanation from http://www.trainsim.com/vbts/archive/index.php/t-188861.html with limited editing; I couldn't quite put my own words to the knowledge!)

Bill69
April 9th, 2012, 05:27 AM
I agree with LordSven

Bill69.

RPearson
April 9th, 2012, 01:51 PM
is it not to control the speed in which the locomotive keeps a constant speedYou're thinking of the term regulator as it is applied in the US. Stationary steam engines had regulators to maintain a constant speed. Steam locomotives didn't use devices like this. Throttle is the more common name in the US for the device Trainz calls a regulator.

Bob Pearson

Jananton
April 9th, 2012, 02:53 PM
You're thinking of the term regulator as it is applied in the US. Stationary steam engines had regulators to maintain a constant speed.

Hmm isn't that what's called a governer, or is that just British slang. :hehe:

Greetings from nighttime Amsterdam,

Jan

Bill69
April 9th, 2012, 03:34 PM
As I said in my answer the regulator is like the throttle valve in a car. In a car the throttle valve adjusts the amount of mixture or air to the manifold, the valves then feed it to the cylinders.

Bill69

RPearson
April 9th, 2012, 08:26 PM
Hmm isn't that what's called a governer, or is that just British slang. :hehe:

Greetings from nighttime Amsterdam,

JanYes, governor. But I'm not sure about a governer.:-)

Bob Pearson

Jananton
April 10th, 2012, 09:48 AM
Yup, that's what you get typing a reply late at night with no default preview option. :hehe:

Governor intended of course.

Greetings from cloudy Amsterdam,

Jan

shadowarrior
April 11th, 2012, 12:51 AM
LordSven got some details there and big_b got the anti skid part right as well.

The ‘Bail’ or ‘Bail-off’ is used to release the independant (locomotive) brakes when the train brake has been applied. This allows the locomotive to ‘stretch’ the train when braking, reducing the stress on the couplers. During heavy braking, or an emergency brake application, it also prevents the locomotive’s wheels from locking up (and hence sliding).

big_b
April 11th, 2012, 05:19 AM
The Flying Scotsman

Dave

captainkman
April 11th, 2012, 05:31 AM
4472, Flying Scotsman.

roblodge
April 14th, 2012, 08:21 AM
roblodge

The Flying Scotsman!


Welcome to the Trains Trivia of the Week thread.

Every Wednesday we will ask you a question here related to trains, and you will have a week to answer the question. Next Wednesday, we will update the previous week's answer and put in a new question again. You can use this thread to discuss your answers.

If you have a trivia question which you want to be featured in this section, email it through to trainznews@n3vgames.com along with the answer.

So you are a ferroequinologist......right? :)

Last week's answer:

The ‘Bail’ or ‘Bail-off’ is used to release the independant (locomotive) brakes when the train brake has been applied. This allows the locomotive to ‘stretch’ the train when braking, reducing the stress on the couplers. During heavy braking, or an emergency brake application, it also prevents the locomotive’s wheels from locking up (and hence sliding).

The ‘Bail’/’Bail Off’ function is available in Trainz (Diesel locomotives only), and can be activated by pressing ‘D’, or ‘0’ on the number pad.


This week's question:

What was the first steam locomotive to circumnavigate the world?

westfalen
April 14th, 2012, 06:20 PM
The Scotsman visited North America and Australia but which route did it travel on it's sea voyages? Unless it crossed the Pacific on one of its trips the answer to the question "Which was the first steam locomotive to circumnavigate the world?" is none.

gg14835
April 15th, 2012, 05:10 PM
The Flying Scotsman

pware
April 16th, 2012, 04:44 AM
To get back on topic, which is ...


This week's question:

What was the first steam locomotive to circumnavigate the world?

My guess is the "Flying Scotsman"

Built 1923 for GNR.

Toured USA in early 1970s

Toured Australia in 1988 where it travelled over 28,000 mi (45,000 km) and set a number of records including the longest non-stop run by a steam loco (442 mi - 711 km).

shadowarrior
April 18th, 2012, 01:45 AM
The first locomotive to circumnavigate the world was former LNER locomotive 4472, Flying Scotsman, when it traveled to Australia in 1988/89, traveling in the same direction around the globe to travel to, and then from, Australia.

big_b
April 18th, 2012, 07:34 AM
90 degrees


Dave

westfalen
April 19th, 2012, 02:12 AM
The first locomotive to circumnavigate the world was former LNER locomotive 4472, Flying Scotsman, when it traveled to Australia in 1988/89, traveling in the same direction around the globe to travel to, and then from, Australia.
Ok, if that's correct I'll agree with Flying Scotsman then, I knew she returned to the UK from San Franscisco via the Panama Canal but wasn't sure of the route to and from Australia.

captainkman
April 19th, 2012, 02:21 AM
"What is the off-set angle of the cylinders/wheels on a standard 2 cylinder steam locomotive?"

The answer is 90 degrees, and as a result the loco makes 4 chufs per revolution.

Bill69
April 20th, 2012, 03:11 PM
Yes the off-set angle on a two cylinder loco is 90 degrees and the reason it has this off-set is so the loco has power from a standing start.
If there was no off-set both cylinders could be at their absolute extremities when the loco comes to a stop, and as a result would not be able to move again under it's own power. The four chuffs per revolution is actually two chuffs per side and this is because the cylinders are double acting i.e. they pull as well as pushing.

Cheers,
Bill69

watasee
April 21st, 2012, 07:40 AM
Welcome to the Trains Trivia of the Week thread.

Every Wednesday we will ask you a question here related to trains, and you will have a week to answer the question. Next Wednesday, we will update the previous week's answer and put in a new question again. You can use this thread to discuss your answers.

If you have a trivia question which you want to be featured in this section, email it through to trainznews@n3vgames.com along with the answer.

So you are a ferroequinologist......right? :)

Last week's answer:

The first locomotive to circumnavigate the world was former LNER locomotive 4472, Flying Scotsman, when it traveled to Australia in 1988/89, traveling in the same direction around the globe to travel to, and then from, Australia.

This week's question:

What is the off-set angle of the cylinders/wheels on a standard 2 cylinder steam locomotive?
" 90 degrees - Also known as quartering - each cylinder stroke is one quarter revolution from the opposite cylinder "

hemi2k
April 24th, 2012, 04:41 PM
The offset is 90 degrees clockwise from left side to right side

Carl

afried
April 27th, 2012, 06:19 PM
i think it is 90 degress

JIb228
May 1st, 2012, 01:08 AM
Its not 90 Deg, its more like 75 to 80. Depending on the driver diameter, builder, and cylinder sizes.

TramDU1214
May 5th, 2012, 03:36 PM
On a ‘compound’ steam locomotive, what is the function of the ‘simpling’ valve?
It is called that way, because it changes double/tripple expansion to single expansion.
Simpler: It lets fresh steam into the low pressure cylinders.

big_b
May 5th, 2012, 06:36 PM
The simpling valve was opened which allowed steam directly from the boiler to the low pressure cylinder as well as the high pressure one. Not only did this provide maximum tractive effort when starting but also avoided problems that might arise if the high pressure piston was in a dead centre position (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Top_dead_centre). Once moving, the simpling valve was closed and the locomotive continued in compound operation.

Dave

TramDU1214
May 6th, 2012, 03:39 AM
The simpling valve was opened which allowed steam directly from the boiler to the low pressure cylinder as well as the high pressure one. Not only did this provide maximum tractive effort when starting but also avoided problems that might arise if the high pressure piston was in a dead centre position (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Top_dead_centre). Once moving, the simpling valve was closed and the locomotive continued in compound operation.

Dave
Where have you copied it? ;) It is great :clap:

Bill69
May 10th, 2012, 04:42 PM
I agree with the above except "fresh steam" it would be more acurate to call it high pressure steam.

Bill

teddytoot
May 11th, 2012, 05:18 AM
This week's question:
When working with a ‘staff and ticket’ safe working system, what is the function of the ‘ticket’?

This is to allow more than one train to proceed along single line working in the same direction. The first driver is issued with a ticket authorising him to proceed. This is repeated if there are more than two trains. The last train carries the staff. Until the staff is received at the end of the section, no train can proceed in the opposite direction.

pga1965
May 13th, 2012, 11:58 AM
a staff allows a train to pass alternatingly from one direction to the other, a 'Ticket' allows one or more train to travel in the same direction, followed on another train by the 'train staff'.

Jananton
May 13th, 2012, 03:06 PM
Presuming this is right, this sounds somehow very Victorian to me. :hehe:

Greetings from nighttime Amsterdam,

Jan

pga1965
May 13th, 2012, 10:22 PM
a staff allows a train to pass alternatingly from one direction to the other, a 'Ticket' allows one or more train to travel in the same direction, followed on another train by the 'train staff'.

of course it more complicated than this in reality, i just tried to give a short answer.

Paul - Ex qld rail station operations

pga1965
May 13th, 2012, 10:33 PM
by the way these rules are no longer permitted to be used as they are deemed unsafe!!!! (but these rules were good enough to be used for 140(roughly) in Queensland)

big_b
May 16th, 2012, 08:15 PM
That would be in Oz across the Nullarbor Plain 478km with a few wiggly bits either side to break the monotony .
One of the few places where you wont miss anything if you blink or rest your eyes for awhile.

Dave

GossenGarrat
May 18th, 2012, 06:39 AM
The Trans-Austrailian railway has the longest strech of straight track in the world

caerafon002
May 19th, 2012, 02:49 AM
Nullabor Plain South Australia

tonytony
May 19th, 2012, 05:11 PM
Nullabor Desert - Australia - 480 miles long

Rik3801T
May 19th, 2012, 10:45 PM
[QUOTE=shadowarrior;962177]Welcome to the Trains Trivia of the Week thread.

Every Wednesday we will ask you a question here related to trains, and you will have a week to answer the question. Next Wednesday, we will update the previous week's answer and put in a new question again. You can use this thread to discuss your answers.

If you have a trivia question which you want to be featured in this section, email it through to trainznews@n3vgames.com along with the answer.

So you are a ferroequinologist......right? :)

Last week's answer:

A ‘staff and ticket’ safe working system uses a ‘staff’ as a token to permit a train into a section of rail line. As only one staff will exist for a particular section of rail line, you will need a way of bringing the staff back to send a train in the same direction again. This either requires a returning train, or requires the staff to be returned by road to the originating station.

So as to allow two trains to travel in the same direction, a ‘ticket’ can be used in place of the staff. The ‘ticket’ will have the train information written on it (most tickets are printed with boxes for this information), and will be stored in a box that can only be unlocked using the staff (this ensures the tickets can only be accessed when the staff is available at that station). When the crew receive the ticket, they must also see that the staff is available for the same section of line, so as to ensure that another train is not in the section.

So as to ensure that no two trains are in the same section, the signalman must have received a message from the next station to inform him that the previous train has cleared the section of line. Other rules also prevent this situation occurring.
Tickets are rarely used on mainline railways, however the ‘staff’ system is still in use in some locations. On busy rail lines, the ‘staff and ticket’ system was replaced by ‘electric staff’ systems, which had multiple staffs locked in a unit, which was electrically linked to an identical unit at the other end of the section. This allowed multiple trains in the same direction, but only allowed one staff to be removed at a time.

This week's question:
Where is the longest straight stretch of railway located?

It is located In Australia, between Port Augusta in SA and Kalgoorlie in WA - across the Nullabor Plain.

Puffingbilly
May 20th, 2012, 01:38 AM
Nullabor Desert - Australia - 480 miles long

Actually it's the world's longest stretch of dead-straight railway track, and is 478 kilometres (297 mi) in length between the 797 km post west of Ooldea and the 1275 km post west of Loongana.

Cheers

Ron

reingeneration
May 20th, 2012, 03:17 AM
Welcome to the Trains Trivia of the Week thread.

Every Wednesday we will ask you a question here related to trains, and you will have a week to answer the question. Next Wednesday, we will update the previous week's answer and put in a new question again. You can use this thread to discuss your answers.

If you have a trivia question which you want to be featured in this section, email it through to trainznews@n3vgames.com along with the answer.

So you are a ferroequinologist......right? :)

Last week's answer:

A ‘staff and ticket’ safe working system uses a ‘staff’ as a token to permit a train into a section of rail line. As only one staff will exist for a particular section of rail line, you will need a way of bringing the staff back to send a train in the same direction again. This either requires a returning train, or requires the staff to be returned by road to the originating station.

So as to allow two trains to travel in the same direction, a ‘ticket’ can be used in place of the staff. The ‘ticket’ will have the train information written on it (most tickets are printed with boxes for this information), and will be stored in a box that can only be unlocked using the staff (this ensures the tickets can only be accessed when the staff is available at that station). When the crew receive the ticket, they must also see that the staff is available for the same section of line, so as to ensure that another train is not in the section.

So as to ensure that no two trains are in the same section, the signalman must have received a message from the next station to inform him that the previous train has cleared the section of line. Other rules also prevent this situation occurring.
Tickets are rarely used on mainline railways, however the ‘staff’ system is still in use in some locations. On busy rail lines, the ‘staff and ticket’ system was replaced by ‘electric staff’ systems, which had multiple staffs locked in a unit, which was electrically linked to an identical unit at the other end of the section. This allowed multiple trains in the same direction, but only allowed one staff to be removed at a time.

This week's question:
Where is the longest straight stretch of railway located?


478km across the Nullabor Plain in Australia

LennyA
May 20th, 2012, 06:53 PM
111 miles in the Nularbor plain in Australia, i believe.

Mickeya
May 21st, 2012, 08:39 AM
Its the track across the Nulabor Plain in Southern Australia I think,300miles dead straight



Mickey

stovepipe
May 22nd, 2012, 06:49 AM
'No tree' plain, AUS.

It was a good map in Railroad Tycoon II as I recall.

big_b
May 23rd, 2012, 05:41 PM
In series resistance is high giving the loco high traction to start off it then changes to
Series -parallel where the resistance is being dropped off in steps ( notches ) to accelerate the loco up to about 30km/h
if full speed is selected resistance is reapplied to to the motors then notched out again to increase speed & decrease resistance until
full speed is reached without resistance the motors are now now in parallel

Dave

tdstead
May 28th, 2012, 04:53 PM
On a diesel-electric or electric locomotive, what is the difference between ‘series’, ‘series-parallel’ and ‘parallel’, in relation to the traction motors?

Pretty simple like the L class Locos I rode on in victoria thast had 33 throttle notches, the first few notches are Series is the slowest used mostly for shunting and to get the train moving , as the throttle advances the next series of knotches is Series Paralllel then finally for the higher speed the last notches are full Parallel.

Also intresting is the Polish locos that have a Fiel Lever you change at higher speeds.


Tom

jjanmarine3
May 29th, 2012, 09:16 PM
The difference is the way that the traction motors are coupled across the main traction generator or main traction alternator .
In simplish short terms relating to diesel locomotives, : When a locomotive starts moving Amperage is High and Voltage is low, as the traction motors speed up the A & V values move toward each other and when saturation point is reached the armarures can turn no faster and the fields are also saturated ( full to their capacity ) at a certain set value before this saturation point is reached low voltage fs relays will be energised ( by a measuring device that monitors volts and amps ) which in turn will pick up high voltage fs contactors, which will couple external resistances to the the traction motors . This results in more 'electrical space' to enable the traction motors to turn faster.This process is called 'field shunting'. When the traction motors slow down again this process is reversed .The driver controls this process by using a lever in the cab that will allow or disallow field shunting. I suppose a person could say this is the locomotives electrical gearbox .:)

Geoff404
June 1st, 2012, 12:47 PM
The terms "Series", "Series-parallel" and "Parallel" normally refer to the connections of the Armature (the bit that rotates) and the Field windings of a Traction Motor. At low speeds the armature is rotating slowly and therefore producing (for a given magnetic field) a low "Back-emf" hence for a given supply voltage a high armature current. By connecting a high current Field winding in Series with the high current Armature winding a powerful magnetic field is created and the motor generates a high torque at low speeds. Hence the use of the "Series" connection for starting and low speed operation. In the "Series-parallel" configuration a second Field winding, connected in parallel with the Series Armature and Field windings is energised, this has the effect of maintaining the Stator Magnetic Field as the motor speed, and hence back-emf, increases. In the "Parallel" configuration the Armature and Field windings are connected in parallel. This configuration is appropriate for high speed operation.

fillflange
June 4th, 2012, 05:49 AM
Welcome to the Trains Trivia of the Week thread.

Every Wednesday we will ask you a question here related to trains, and you will have a week to answer the question. Next Wednesday, we will update the previous week's answer and put in a new question again. You can use this thread to discuss your answers.

If you have a trivia question which you want to be featured in this section, email it through to trainznews@n3vgames.com along with the answer.

So you are a ferroequinologist......right? :)

Last week's answer:

The longest straight stretch of railway line in the world is across the Nullabor Plain in Australia on the Trans-Australia Railway, running from the 797KM post (west of Ooldea), to the 1275KM post (west of Loongana), covering 478KM (approx 297 miles).

This week's question:
On a diesel-electric or electric locomotive, what is the difference between ‘series’, ‘series-parallel’ and ‘parallel’, in relation to the traction motors?
Le differenze sono che : in serie si mettono ad esempio in una loco di 6 assi motori tutti i motori in trazione uno dopo l'altro.In serie-parallelo si mettono in trazione due rami di motori di tre motori .In parallelo tre rami di due motori.In alcune loco elettriche dalla e 646-645 fs Italia vi è anche il super-parallelo però la loco ha 12 motori tre rami da quattro.

big_b
June 4th, 2012, 11:48 PM
navvie - Railway builders track layers etc

dave

teddytoot
June 5th, 2012, 04:26 AM
Navvie is the colloquial name for the labourers who did the basic earth moving for the original railways here in Britain. The name is a corruption of navigator, a name given to them when they were originally employed in digging out the canal system which preceeded the railways. Nowadays the term tend to be employed for any labourer employed in earthmoving work.

zava
June 10th, 2012, 03:06 AM
it does mean an unskilled laborer working on the constraction of a railway road, canal, or every sort of artificial passage, does it not?

big_b
June 13th, 2012, 04:00 AM
navvie on tramp

walking from one job to another ( only means of transport )

Falaise
June 19th, 2012, 03:49 AM
Welcome to the Trains Trivia of the Week thread.

Every Wednesday we will ask you a question here related to trains, and you will have a week to answer the question. Next Wednesday, we will update the previous week's answer and put in a new question again. You can use this thread to discuss your answers.

If you have a trivia question which you want to be featured in this section, email it through to trainznews@n3vgames.com along with the answer.

So you are a ferroequinologist......right? :)

Last week's answer:

On a railway, a Navvie is a trackworker. On railways, this term was initially used to mean railway construction workers who were working to dig/build the trackbed, cuttings, embankments, and tunnels. The name actually comes from ‘navigators’, referring to the builders of the earlier canals. Later, the term was used to refer to any track worker, either construction or maintenance. Some locations still use the term ‘navvie’, with the suger cane tramways in Queensland using this as an official term for workers performing trackwork.

This week's question:
Carrying on from our previous question, what would a navvie mean when he was “on tramp”?


Why not in french:'(

big_b
June 20th, 2012, 11:17 PM
In what year was the first EMD ‘FT’ type diesel locomotive produced?
November 1939

GARTHAH
July 6th, 2012, 10:08 AM
When did the first Garratt locomotive operate, and for which railway was it built?
first Garratt was K1 2 foot gauge and it operated in Tasmania originally and currently it is on Welsh Highland Railway after repatriation and to UK and restoration.

cheers Garth

big_b
July 6th, 2012, 09:05 PM
When working with 2 position signals (semaphore or colour light), what is the function of a ‘splitting home’ signal

Main & secondary track in a junction .Height of signal determines main & secondary

ad602000
July 7th, 2012, 04:33 AM
When did the first Garratt locomotive operate, and for which railway was it built?
1909 for the North-East Dundas Tramway, Tasmania

steamrodder
July 12th, 2012, 09:18 PM
In 1907 Beyer, Peacock & Co. (http://forums.auran.com/wiki/Beyer,_Peacock_%26_Co.) submitted a proposal for a 2 ft (610 mm) gauge 0-4-0+0-4-0 (http://forums.auran.com/wiki/0-4-0%2B0-4-0) Garratt to the New South Wales Government Railways.... That's what I found in Wickipedia. -Robert-

teddytoot
July 13th, 2012, 04:07 AM
As stated above, the first two Beyer-Garrats (K1 and K2) were supplied to the North East Dundas Tramway in 1909. The line closed in 1930 and they lay derelict in the deserted engine shed at Zeehan. In 1947 K1 was repurchased by Beyer Peacock and is now preserved in the UK. K2 was scrapped.

big_b
July 14th, 2012, 10:32 AM
What is the purpose of a co-acting signal

To give the driver a better view of the signal from a distance usually due to some kind of obstruction natural or man made blocking the view of the signal at normal height.

nexusdj
July 21st, 2012, 12:57 PM
A co-acting signal repeats the exact indication of the signal that it is associated with to give a driver a clearer indication where the associated main signal has restricted sighting .

JackDownUnder
July 22nd, 2012, 02:13 PM
Welcome to the Trains Trivia of the Week thread.

Every Wednesday we will ask you a question here related to trains, and you will have a week to answer the question. Next Wednesday, we will update the previous week's answer and put in a new question again. You can use this thread to discuss your answers.

If you have a trivia question which you want to be featured in this section, email it through to trainznews@n3vgames.com along with the answer.

So you are a ferroequinologist......right? :)

Last week's answer:

The first Garratt locomotive, known as ‘K1’ (K class locomotive number 1) entered service in 1909 with the Tasmanian Government Railways on the North East Dundas tramway, in Tasmania, Australia. Locomotive K1 is now preserved operational on the Welsh Highlands Railway. A second locomotive (K2) was also built and operated, however was scrapped.

This week's question:
What is the purpose of a co-acting signal?


Co-acting signals were provided to make it easier for the driver to see the signal. It was thought that a standard height post would not afford the driver enough "sight distance" so this Co-acting signal was provided. From a long distance the top arm was clearly visible. As the train got closer the top arm was
so high that easy viewing was difficult by which time the bottom arm was in good view.

big_b
July 29th, 2012, 06:14 PM
In what year did LNER A4 class locomotive #4468 (Mallard) set the world record for the fastest steam locomotive, and what speed was reached?

3/7/38 202.58 kph - 125.88 mph

Beattie
July 29th, 2012, 06:41 PM
Whats the oldest operating railroad company in america and how old is it?

TheParot67
August 1st, 2012, 01:27 PM
The Strasburg Railroad was chartered on June 9th 1832, making it 180 years old.

ZecMurphy
August 1st, 2012, 08:40 PM
Hi All
If you wish to submit a new trivia question, please use the email address in the first post. The current trivia question is in the first post of the thread, and will also be announced via the Trainz newsletter.

Please do not post new questions in the thread, as this will lead to confusion with the 'official' trivia question at the start of the thread.

Regards

Euphod
August 1st, 2012, 08:44 PM
Most confusing thread....ever!

big_b
August 8th, 2012, 10:04 AM
may 10 - 1869

AlanBradbury
August 8th, 2012, 10:48 AM
The line was completed on April 28th 1869, but as big b correctly states, the official Golden Spike ceremony took place a few days later, on May 10.

Al

big_b
August 12th, 2012, 06:16 AM
In what year was the last Climax locomotive built, and what was the highest builder's number given to a Climax locomotive?

1928 ---- highest build number 1694

big_b
August 19th, 2012, 06:12 AM
In the 1953 movie The Titfield Thunderbolt, which real locomotive played the part of the locomotive 'Thunderbolt'

lion 115 yo loco built in 1838

big_b
August 25th, 2012, 08:42 AM
In what year did the Central Railroad of New Jersey (CNJ) begin operating it's Blue Comet service?

1929

jjanmarine3
August 28th, 2012, 02:17 AM
ohmyword :confused:

big_b
September 1st, 2012, 07:34 AM
As part of the 75th anniversary celebrations for Mallard's setting of the record for fastest steam locomotive, two A4 locomotives will return to the United Kingdom for the celebrations. What are the names and numbers of these locomotives, and where are they coming from?

Dominion of Canada #60010 in blue livery from the Canadian Railway Museum Delson/Saint-Constant Quebec &
Dwight D Eisenhower #60008 in green livery from the National Railroad Museum Wisconsin

big_b
September 16th, 2012, 09:31 AM
In what year did the Eurostar service begin operation through the Channel Tunnel between London and Paris and Brussles

14 November 1994

mezzoprezzo
September 16th, 2012, 10:44 AM
Q&A removed from quote

Hi big_b.

Shouldn't the question and answer have been emailed as advised in the OP, rather than be placed in the thread?




Most confusing thread....ever!

The most confusing thread, ever, is generally attributed to Arthur Spencer Carru .....

Oh, ... sorry , my mistake:o. For a moment I thought Ed had posed a new question.:D

Cheers
Casper

teddytoot
September 16th, 2012, 02:04 PM
Big_b has read his newsletter early. I have noticed several times that the previous answer and the new question appear in the newsletter before they are posted here.

big_b
September 16th, 2012, 04:30 PM
The same question was also asked in the news letter dated 9th Sept a week ago


Dave

mezzoprezzo
September 16th, 2012, 05:07 PM
I’ve not seen a Newsletter for months!

The link in this post (http://forums.auran.com/trainz/showthread.php?62767-Latest-Trainz-Newsletter) no longer brings up the latest issue. It appears to have been abandoned since February 2012.

Casper
:confused:

big_b
September 16th, 2012, 05:51 PM
I see what you mean
It may be on the "soon" list of things to do!
They have been coming out on a regular weekly basis since at least May/June.Usually a Sunday night here last one was just after midnight this morning (Monday)

Dave

big_b
September 23rd, 2012, 03:09 AM
In what year did the first PRR K4s locomotive enter service

1916