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Milwaukeeroad261
November 9th, 2010, 07:39 PM
does anyone have any advice for content creating that doesnt have any front elevation, small detail, and bogey diagrams (mainly steam)

-AJ

whitepass
November 10th, 2010, 10:09 AM
Do the research before you start, a lot of steam locos can not be made do to lack of plans, data, and some times photos.

wva-usa
November 10th, 2010, 11:55 AM
does anyone have any advice for content creating that doesnt have any front elevation, small detail, and bogey diagrams (mainly steam)

Specifically, are you asking about a U.S. built steam locomotive, and if so, which kind of "bogey" are you talking about? Drivers? Pony/pilot truck? Booster/trailing truck? Tender trucks?

Typically, American steam locomotive made in the 20th century used standard designs for trucks, which often were designed/patented by only a few companies. For example, the Commonwealth Steel Company (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commonwealth_Steel_Co.) made the castings for the 2-wheel Delta trailing truck (below), which was used extensively during the steam era by various American locomotive builders.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/54/Delta_trailing_truck_Commonwealth_Steel_Co.jpg/220px-Delta_trailing_truck_Commonwealth_Steel_Co.jpg

You'll find a good many scale drawings that have been printed in modeling magazines and books that didn't show complete details of the tender trucks for example. The publisher of the drawings often just gave the (proper) name of the type of truck used, e.g. "6-wheel Commonwealth" or "6-wheel Buckeye" or "4-wheel Andrews".

If you know the *proper* name (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proper_noun) of the truck, then you can usually find drawings or at least photos. For example, the "6-wheel Commonwealth" tender trucks used a design from the Commonwealth Steel Company, etc. (Note: You won't find the term "bogey" used as the "proper" name for any trucks built/used on U.S. made steam locomotives)

You can usually find someone (via the multitude of RR-related discussion forums on the 'Net) or some organization (RR historical societies, etc.) that can tell you the proper name of the trucks used a given "class" of locomotives. Once you know the (proper) name, you can usually find drawings, such as the one below, for a Bettendorf tender truck (made by the Bettendorf Axle Company), from the "Locomotive Cyclopedia of American Practice, Vol. 1" of 1906.

http://lh4.ggpht.com/_gLo7ixg1BxI/TNrg90bCuxI/AAAAAAAAAPM/BCaZm9T9dKE/s288/Bettendorf-Tender-Truck.png
(http://books.google.com/books?id=NOZSAAAAMAAJ&lpg=PA33&ots=eo3R-dcG2I&dq=Locomotive%20cyclopedia%20of%20American%20pract ice%2C%20Volume%202&pg=PA391&ci=82%2C212%2C835%2C572&source=bookclip)

Although specific to Z-scale modeling, this Web page (http://jamesriverbranch.net/clinic_2a.htm) provides a good overview of the standard designs used for the more common types of trucks typically used on American locomotive tenders and rolling-stock.



Do the research before you start, a lot of steam locos can not be made do to lack of plans, data, and some times photos.

Actually, it's very possible to build a reasonably accurate model without having a complete set of drawings or photos. For example, there aren't a complete set of plans for the N&W's non-streamlined versions of the railroad's Class J 4-8-4 that were built during the WWII years. There are only a handful of photos of the non-streamlined Js that exist, and not a single photo of the right-side of the locomotive has ever been found.

But there have been models made of the locomotive over the years, simply because it's possible to surmise what the right-side looked like, based on standard industry practices.