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martinvk
August 19th, 2009, 09:45 PM
Is there a way to have a visual indication to show if a section of track has been straightened in TS2009? If there is a pronounced curve in the track or leading into a facing junction it can be obvious but there are many times when the effect is very subtle. :)

Can the mini map be configured to use a different colour for straightened track?
Or perhaps a Surveyor only trackside object could be made that could read and show the track attribute?

Dermmy
August 20th, 2009, 01:41 AM
I know exactly what you mean and it can be damned frustrating! If in doubt I attach a new piece of track temporarily to one end of the suspect track length and then move the new 'loose end' about. If the suspect track stays straight it is straightened, if it curves it isn't....

Andy :)

BobCass
August 20th, 2009, 01:49 AM
Hi martink: The best I could offer is you might want to try the Guides on the DLS, I beleive they have straight ones.


Bob Cass :)

Tokkyu40
August 20th, 2009, 07:22 AM
If in doubt, I click on the track with the Straighten tool. If I can't tell the difference, I don't worry about it.

:cool:Claude

cascaderailroad
August 20th, 2009, 07:33 AM
If in doubt, questioning if the track is straightened or not, simply delete the one section, and re-do the single segment of track in question, and straighten it again.

danny5
August 20th, 2009, 12:32 PM
could en you run a rule over the track and see if it's straight ?
Danny5

Dermmy
August 20th, 2009, 03:06 PM
could en you run a rule over the track and see if it's straight ?
Danny5

The issue isn't whether the track is 'straight', it's whether or not the 'straighten' tool has been applied. Sometimes the application of the tool is obvious, but sometimes it isn't....

Andy ;)

American_Connections
August 20th, 2009, 03:25 PM
#1 is the track straight with the grid? Have yor applied straight track to it? Set a rule between the curves you want it to connect to, is it straight? I think you need to accually THINK! Are you straight?

martinvk
August 20th, 2009, 05:19 PM
The question is not does it look straight, the question is, has it been straightened. There is a difference.

When you form junctions, if the wrong leg is straightened, you don't get a smooth transition. The effect might be very subtle on high speed switches but it's still there.

Back in the day of TRS2004 and TrainzMap, you could get a view which showed the status of each segment, whether or not it was straightened. :o

Why can we get that now with TS2009? :confused:

Dermmy
August 21st, 2009, 05:33 AM
#1 is the track straight with the grid? Have yor applied straight track to it? Set a rule between the curves you want it to connect to, is it straight? I think you need to accually THINK! Are you straight?

A wake-up call, huh? Well I am pretty sure I am awake. Pretty sure Martin is too. Whether a track is 'straight' is blindingly obvious. Whether or not the 'straighten' tool has been applied is sometimes impossible to tell. In the simplistic example you quote I am pretty sure both Martin and I could work out that it was straightened. Now go look at a straight length of track composed of five spline segments. When you can tell me how I can tell at a glance whether the straighten tool has or has not been applied to the centre section, I might take you off my ignore list...

Andy :)

nicky9499
August 21st, 2009, 12:07 PM
Wow AC, this was a perfectly normal discussion until you inadvertently brought sexual orientation into the picture.

martinvk, just temporarily attach track to the spline ends of the track you want to know is straightened or not. Wiggle it about 360 degrees then hit escape (you don't need to actually place it). The track that moves is not straightened. If both don't then both are straightened.

Alternatively, go down the spline using the curvature tool (hit 'L' key). If anywhere along the spline the tool shows a very large number (example 452607) then it's not straightened.

But keep in mind; two straightened splines can affect each other as well, both in elevation and curvature.

Cheerio,
Nicholas.

martinvk
August 21st, 2009, 03:56 PM
OK, I was hoping for a visual indication without having to interact with each and every segment I'm interested in but it looks like we lost something when we left 2004 :o