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illinoiscentral
April 10th, 2009, 07:09 PM
Hello Everyone, I thought I would post some useful infomation, mostly for our younger members who do not know this stuff.

I will add more as my researching comes along.

Horn Sequences.
When approaching a grade crossing use this sequence to warn the crossing,
H---- H---- H- H------- ( Long, Long, Short, Long) This should not be any shorter than 15 seconds, nor any longer that 20 seconds.

When you are at a stop and you decide to go forward use this sequence,
H-- H-- (Two Short Blasts) *When at a depot (depending on regulations) turn your bell on also.

When at a stop and you decide to move in the reverse direction use this sequence,
H- H- H- (Three Short Blasts)* When at a depot (depending on regulations) turn your bell on also

When approaching a private crossing (non-public road) turn your bell on only.

When there is a person or animal on the tracks, use this sequence and use speed caution,
H- H- H- H- H- (Five Short Blasts)*Use bell also.

When the train comes to a complete stop at a station use this sequence,
H--- (One short or long blast)

* Information based on proceedures used by the Monticello Railway Museum, Monticello Illinois.
* I will not be held responsible for your accident in Trainz!:hehe:
It is in my best interest that this become a "sticky". I hope you guys can come back time & time again.

Well, I hope this information comes in handy. Have a nice day.

Woody:wave:

jadebullet
April 10th, 2009, 07:18 PM
Don't forget the horn signal for approaching a station. One long blast of the horn.

rweber95
April 10th, 2009, 11:52 PM
To expand this a little bit, here is a page out of the General Code of Operating Rules (GCOR 2000).

5.8 Bell and Whistle Signals
5.8.1 Ringing Engine Bell
Ring the engine bell under any of the following conditions:
Before moving, except when making momentary stop and start switching movements.
As a warning signal anytime it is necessary.
When approaching men or equipment on or near the track.
When approaching public crossings at grade with the engine in front, as follows:
- If distance permits, ringing must begin at least 1/4 mile before the public crossing and
continue until the crossing is occupied.
or
- If distance does not permit, ringing must begin soon enough before the crossing to provide a
warning and continue until the crossing is occupied.
5.8.2 Sounding Whistle
When weather conditions impair visibility, sound the whistle frequently.
When other employees are working in the immediate area, sound the required whistle signal
before moving.
Other forms of communications may be used in place of whistle signals, except signals (1) and
(11). See following chart.
The required whistle signals are illustrated by o for short sounds and for longer sounds:
Sound Indication
[1] Succession Use when an emergency exists, or persons or livestock are on the
of short sounds track. When crews on other trains hear this signal, they must stop
until it is safe to proceed.
[2] When stopped: air brakes are applied, pressure equalized.
[3] Release brakes. Proceed.
[4] o o Acknowledgment of any signal not otherwise provided for.
[5] o o o When stopped: back up. Acknowledgment of hand signal to back up.
[6] o o o o Request for signal to be given or repeated if not understood.
[7] o o o Flagman protect rear of train.
[8] o o o Flagman protect front of train.
[9] Flagman may return from west or south.
[10] Flagman may return from east or north.
[11] o Approaching public crossings at grade with engine in front, start signal not less than mile before reaching crossing, if distance permits. If distance does not permit, start signal soon enough before the crossing to provide warning. Prolong or repeat signal until engine occupies the crossing.
Use this signal to warn employees when:
Approaching men or equipment on or near the track, regardless of any whistle
prohibitions.
or
View is obstructed.

Euphod
April 11th, 2009, 12:08 AM
Here's my mean contribution:

http://www.alkrug.vcn.com/rrfacts/rrfacts.htm

Lots of interesting and useful information there, Now Get Off MY LAWN!:(

rweber95
April 11th, 2009, 12:24 AM
You can download a copy of the GCOR that's used by most railroads in the US. Get it here http://home.comcast.net/~eng95/GCOR.pdf

Bob

illinoiscentral
April 11th, 2009, 11:04 AM
Thanks Guys!
Thank You so much rweber! You beat me to it! I had just done a little researching before bed last night. I hope this thread can help folks operate more realisticly.

Woody

Euphod
April 13th, 2009, 11:20 PM
Here's a tidbit I picked up from Model Railroader, and will help anyone looking to model grain train activites:

BNSF Ry. Grain Elevator directory:

www.bnsf.com/markets/agricultural/elevator

leeferr
April 13th, 2009, 11:28 PM
Here's a tidbit I picked up from Model Railroader, and will help anyone looking to model grain train activites:

BNSF Ry. Grain Elevator directory:

www.bnsf.com/markets/agricultural/elevator (http://www.bnsf.com/markets/agricultural/elevator)

Thanks Ed
that is a very interesting and useful link
Mike