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axe1970
January 1st, 1970, 12:00 AM
I made a tutorial in this thread. http://forums.auran.com/trainz/showthread.php?t=12365&highlight=displacement

....but I don't know how useful it was. Hopefully it will be for you.

Regards

Ian_Coleman
November 13th, 2008, 02:49 PM
I'm looking for a good landscape creation tutor. I know there's some out there, but I don't seem to be able to locate one!

Can someone help please?

Ian

davesnow
November 13th, 2008, 06:47 PM
If you mean creating Displacements (landscapes) in Photoshop, try my mini-tutorial here:

http://forums.auran.com/trainz/showthread.php?t=28240

bernhart_lossiemouth
November 13th, 2008, 07:01 PM
Do you mean a tutorial? Or a tutor who can come to your house after school for $50 per hour? I know where you can locate a tutor, but for a tutorial you might need to think about using the internet.

Bernie

Ian_Coleman
November 14th, 2008, 03:31 AM
Oh Mr bernhart_lossiemouth!

What a funny man you are! I'm amazed at your wit! I can't stop laughing!


Thanks for your reply, davesnow.

No, I don't have Photoshop. I just meant a tutorial to enable me to build a decent landscape, with good smooth tracks!

Ian

0099
November 14th, 2008, 05:07 AM
No, I don't have Photoshop. I just meant a tutorial to enable me to build a decent landscape, with good smooth tracks!

Ian

Not sure if it meets your needs but have you checked the Tips and tricks - Surveyor thread ? In between the other stuff im sure there is some landscaping things ( I don't read the thread so i wouldn't know )

Anthony

rweber95
November 14th, 2008, 11:29 PM
There are a lot of good ideas here http://www.virtualrailroader.com/basic_trainz.html

Bob

escafeld
November 16th, 2008, 02:08 AM
If it's a fictional route I'm doing, I always lay the track first, but make sure it isn't all a dead straight track by adding plenty of curves.

There is always a reason to have a curve in a railway, as it's more expensive than laying straight track, so on your layout you need to show a reason for doing this - a hill, hollow, water, houses, mines, forestry, factories and so on. Some ruthless railway builders ploughed through houses and such, but you can take a more sympathetic approach.

I would make sure not to lay any track at zero level. I would add a few gradients so that track can go over track and roads and water. Get some tunnels built and raise the land over them to suit. Rivers came first so get a river dug out. Roads came second and usually followed the rivers. Same with the railways. They can intertwine many times in the course of a route.

************************************************** ****

Double track

When I'm laying double track I select a double track from anyone one of those with the correct spacing between tracks. In my case 3.5

I lay the straight sections with double track and then join the two ends with single tracks. I then delete the double track and join the gaps up with single track and use the straightening tool on them. If you have a long sweeping curve, it may pay to check on the gap between the two track. They can sometimes come a little too close together in the centre of the curve and/or cause a wobble in the running of the train.

With a long curve I add a very small section of double track over the exsisting track, line it up and then break the single sections apart by adding spline points. I join the single track to the short section of double and then delete the double track as above.

Watch out for gradients, don't make them too steep. A rise of 1 metre across a baseboard equals a gradient of 1 in 75, which is quite steep. Aim for less, say half a metre.

Practice makes perfect.

Ian_Coleman
November 16th, 2008, 04:59 AM
Thank you Dave. This is just the sort of advice that I was hoping for!

Just one clarification please - Regarding what you say about laying the track first, but not at ground level, do you mean that you lay the track on the virgin baseboard, then lift it by means of the 'raise spline height' control?

I presume then, that having done that, allowing for ny gradients that you require, you then use the 'smooth track height' control to lift the ground up to meet the track.

I plan to start a new layout, using that method, later today. But I just wanted to be sure that I had fully understood what you were saying.

I knew that using double-track is not recommended, so I always use single track, but your way of using double-track, and then changing to single seems a very good idea, as I find it very difficult to keep the spacing even.

Ian

escafeld
November 16th, 2008, 05:12 AM
Mostly I lift the track and use the 'smooth track height' control, as you say. It's just a matter then of checking out the height of the raised ground level and applying it roughly around the track.

Sometimes, as in the layout I'm working on, which has a gradient from 90 metres to 300 metres. I will raise the ground level on a patch of each baseboard, getting higher and higher with each board and copy and paste it around. It forms 'steps', which I smooth out later and then either build up further, or reduce in height.

escafeld
November 16th, 2008, 05:16 AM
It's a pity the displacement maps don't work on raised ground. All they do is take it back to the level it would have been before you raised the ground level.

escafeld
November 16th, 2008, 05:31 AM
I had this Derby station on another route http://i14.photobucket.com/albums/a303/escafeld01/Screen_184.jpg, which was at a ground level of 10 metres. I merged it onto another route at 300 metres and had to raise every spline point by 290 metres. I added a blank baseboard to the route and raised the level to 300 metres and copied and pasted several squares of it to where the elevated station was and it worked fine. The platform ends have been fixed, by-the-way

Ian_Coleman
November 16th, 2008, 05:33 AM
Thanks Dave,

I'm going to try your methods on a fictional layout.

Ian

escafeld
November 16th, 2008, 05:48 AM
There are about a dozen textures I like, which are default textures and are all in a block. I'll pull out the kuids later. I only use three or four in any one place, but swap for darker or lighter colours as I go along.

I try and keep off splines, which is difficult.

Have a look at the 'Tips and Tricks' forum. Several people have posted in there, myself included. There are some really useful tips.

escafeld
November 16th, 2008, 05:51 AM
Have a look at this thread for vegetation, which I started. Note the links to screenshots.

http://forums.auran.com/trainz/showthread.php?p=4541#post4541

escafeld
November 16th, 2008, 06:37 AM
An excellent tutorial

http://trains.0catch.com/tutorial.html#index

wreeder
November 16th, 2008, 10:06 AM
It's a pity the displacement maps don't work on raised ground. All they do is take it back to the level it would have been before you raised the ground level.

You can use the displacement map on an empty baseboard and then copy and paste the new terrain to your map using the relative setting in the copy panel. This adds the terrain variations to the existing level of the land without the return to zero problem. It works on hillsides too.

TS2009 has added the ability to use Displacement maps as terrain shaping brushes. Just choose a displacement map before using one of the ground shaping tools. The cursor changes to a square and the radius dial controls the size of the area effected.

William

JCitron
November 16th, 2008, 11:55 AM
You can use the displacement map on an empty baseboard and then copy and paste the new terrain to your map using the relative setting in the copy panel. This adds the terrain variations to the existing level of the land without the return to zero problem. It works on hillsides too.

TS2009 has added the ability to use Displacement maps as terrain shaping brushes. Just choose a displacement map before using one of the ground shaping tools. The cursor changes to a square and the radius dial controls the size of the area effected.

William

Thank you for the tip on TRS2009. This is cool!, I have to give it a try.

John

Ian_Coleman
November 16th, 2008, 01:41 PM
Displacement maps are something that I know absolutely nothing about.
A brief explanation would be greatly appreciated.

Also, could someone kindly explain the purpose of the split spline button?

I'm getting on a bit, and it takes a little longer before things sink in!

Thanks,
Ian

wreeder
November 16th, 2008, 05:06 PM
OK, Split Spine first since it is the easiest.

You have a section of track that you have laid. It has five spline points in its length. If you use the split spline tool on one of the spline points in the middle you cause it to become unconnected and have two spline points in the same place instead of one. Use the move tool to grab one of the spline points and drag it away from the other.

Here is a very good tutorial on using displacement maps in trainz.

http://www.uktrainz.co.uk/faq/Displacement_Tutorial_0.1.pdf

Ian_Coleman
November 18th, 2008, 10:51 AM
Thanks wreeder
What is the advantage in using the Split Spine tool, as opposed to just crating a new spline point wherever it is needed?

Ian

escafeld
November 18th, 2008, 08:08 PM
In all the time I've used Trainz, I've never ever used the Split Spline tool, so forget it if it troubles you.

Displacement maps are all ready built into Trainz, so you don't have to create any, but it can be a fun thing.

I had a hand in this thread, which you may find interesting.

http://forums.auran.com/trainz/showthread.php?t=2021&page=5

This thread you might wish to look at about yard ladders - sidings, as we call them. Some links are broken, but there is some useful stuff left.

http://forums.auran.com/trainz/showthread.php?t=8197

Dave

wreeder
November 19th, 2008, 07:23 AM
Thanks wreeder
What is the advantage in using the Split Spine tool, as opposed to just crating a new spline point wherever it is needed?

Ian

The only advantage that I know of is that it creates the new spline point without moving anything out of alignment. When you use the Add Spline Point tool if you do not click directly on the centerline of the spline then the new spline point will deform the shape of the spline.

I can't say that I use it for much but I did know what it did so I answered your question.:D

William

backyard
November 19th, 2008, 08:28 AM
:cool: Thanks for this list of tutorials, I'll add these to my Favorites. I'm adept at tracklaying in elevated terrain, however vegetation management in route creation really dogs my cats!

Last night, I downloaded a Trainz SP-1 layout called "Thurmond."

At one point in the route, a mainline ran across a bridge then across a siding, then connected to the mainline on the otherside of the siding, for a junction.

The point at where it crossed the siding was a diamond...since diamonds are tricky for AI Drivers, I decided to remove the diamond, attach the diverging route off the bridge to the siding, then install a crossover.

I used the Split Spline tool to disconnect the junction & moved the diverging route to the siding, then reconnected the mainline using the Move Spline tool.

Also, the Split Spine tool can be used to disconnect track from a bridge or portal without deleting the track...reducing the number of clicks & keyboard commands because a portal's elevation cannot be changed using a Spline Height tool.

So...any place you need to edit a spine point without deleting track, the Split Spine tool is handy.

ldowns
November 19th, 2008, 09:50 AM
Thanks wreeder
What is the advantage in using the Split Spine tool, as opposed to just crating a new spline point wherever it is needed?

Ian

What I've found it most useful for is fixing cases where I inadvertantly joined two splines without intending to (such as when laying double track and accidentally joining them). Since the undo command is a potential disaster when used with splines, this can sometimes save a bit of time instead of deleting the accidentally joined splines and relaying them.

--Lamont'

ish6
November 19th, 2008, 10:23 AM
Good info in this thread ... :p

Ish

axe1970
November 20th, 2008, 12:03 AM
hmmm,

I don't know how my post appeared at the top of this thread. Sorry for that.
I think it happened when the forum had a bit of a hickup this week.

regards

NSWGR_46Class
November 20th, 2008, 12:06 AM
What I've found it most useful for is fixing cases where I inadvertantly joined two splines without intending to (such as when laying double track and accidentally joining them). Since the undo command is a potential disaster when used with splines, this can sometimes save a bit of time instead of deleting the accidentally joined splines and relaying them.

--Lamont'
Hold down the left shift key when working with splines and they will not do the magic join trick

davesnow
November 20th, 2008, 09:03 AM
Hold down the left shift key when working with splines and they will not do the magic join trick

Yeah. If it weren't for this "tool" I'd never be able to lay side by side track the way I do in my routes.

greywolfretired
November 21st, 2008, 01:09 AM
Ian, I sent you an email but I think I sent it to someone else as well, axe1970 I think. Oh well thats life.

axe1970
November 21st, 2008, 02:57 AM
Ian, I sent you an email but I think I sent it to someone else as well, axe1970 I think. Oh well thats life.

I didn't recieve an email or a PM.

Regards

greywolfretired
November 23rd, 2008, 08:29 PM
I did a tutorial in landscaping texturing ect couple years ago. Its in a PDF file,not sure how to upload so if you are interested in it let me know and I'll send it to you.

martinvk
November 23rd, 2008, 11:11 PM
Instead of placing double track and then replacing it with two single tracks later, I use some of the many track spacing tools that are available to keep the two tracks properly aligned. Some are just visual spacers, that is you align splice points with the tool but they are not attached to it. Others are physical spacers that you attach the track splines to. Then if you need to you can move the whole thing as a unit if the alignment needs some adjusting.

Ian_Coleman
November 24th, 2008, 04:08 AM
To greywolfretired.

I didn't get an email!

Ian

greywolfretired
November 24th, 2008, 09:18 AM
Ian . I just sent you an email through the forum.

backyard
November 24th, 2008, 03:33 PM
:cool: I use Geo-data maps(DEM) & add a simple Topo map overlay.

I use the Surveyor Mini-map to view said route & trace the railroad lines, roads, etc.

This is a simular process offered by TransDEM's UTM tiles, that go under the baseboard & viewed in Grid View.

I add spline points at every hash-mark as lines delineate railroads have.

Then using trackcharts I start at the low end milepost of the route, example MP0.0, MP1, MP2, or MP693, MP694, MP695, etc. This develops track direction priority(the default direction of the arrows on traincars set-up in Surveyor).

Moving down the line, I check elevation & gradient using the Mini-map. Most of the time you can left-click the spline-point using the Height tool(CTRL+H), then the Smooth-Spline tool(CTRL+S).

In the United States of America, the average grade was established by the Baltimore & Ohio as max 1.9%...this is a rule of thumb & you readily find that many places for a short distance may be as much as 2.5%, averaged with a group of changes in a distance to lower than this.

This is why "ruling grades" may not necessarily reflect a particular grade on the same line.

It only gets spooky when you begin to make deep 30 foot cuts or 30 foot embankments & that makes the 5 meter grid in TS2009 very desirable!

Then you find pictures on the web or drive to the location & find the work you did in Surveyor is spot on!

Going back to the beginning of the route, I survey the tangents(straight track) & radius(curved track) for irregularities & remove unneeded spline points. This is the remedy for the short quick side rolls you get on some trackwork even to the point of grabbing a spline point(CTRL+M) move tool & jerking the hell out of it one way then the next to figure the next move.

Using the Undo(CTRL+Z) tool to replace spline point then removing another spline point usually brings a consistent easement at the tangent to radius divergence.

Practice at this also benefits the laying of switches as does using the Spline Straighten tool(CTRL+B). All switches must have at least three spline points & best have the main & diverging route spline points just touch each-other for the best switch. I have found adding one more spline point not more than ten meters just before the switch works great however you must watch out on grades for a severe difference in gradient in this section of track. I find the best at track speed switch has a length of about seven 10 meter squares...enough for now.

backyard
November 24th, 2008, 03:36 PM
:cool:
Radius In Imp. Ft. = Equiv. Radii %


17,192.0=0.33
8,596.0=0.67
5,730.7=1.00
4,298.1=1.33
3,438.5=1.67
2,865.5=2.00
2,456.2=2.33
2,149.2=2.67
1,910.4=3.00
1,719.4=3.33
1,563.2=3.67
1,433.0=4.00
1,322.8=4.33
1,228.3=4.67
1,146.5=5.00
1,074.9=5.33
1,011.7=5.67
955.5=6.00
905.3=6.33
860.1=6.67
819.2=7.00
782.0=7.33
748.0=7.67
716.9=8.00
688.3=8.33
661.9=8.67
637.4=9.00
614.7=9.33
593.5=9.67
573.8=10.00
555.3=10.33
538.0=10.67
521.8=11.00
506.5=11.33
492.0=11.67
478.4=12.00
465.5=12.33
453.3=12.67
441.8=13.00
430.8=13.33
420.3=13.67
410.4=14.00
400.9=14.33
391.8=14.67
383.1=15.00
374.9=15.33
366.9=15.67
359.3=16.00
352.0=16.33
345.1=16.67
338.3=17.00
331.9=17.33
325.7=17.67
319.7=18.00
313.9=18.33
308.4=18.67
303.0=19.00
297.8=19.33
292.8=19.67
288.0=20.00
283.3=20.33
278.8=20.67
274.4=21.00
270.2=21.33
266.1=21.67
262.1=22.00
258.2=22.33
254.5=22.67
250.8=23.00
247.3=23.33
243.9=23.67
240.5=24.00
237.3=24.33
234.1=24.67
231.1=25.00
228.1=25.33
225.1=25.67
222.3=26.00
219.5=26.33
216.9=26.67
214.2=27.00
211.7=27.33

Ian_Coleman
November 25th, 2008, 04:11 AM
Ian . I just sent you an email through the forum.

I didn't get that one either!

regards,

Ian

greywolfretired
November 25th, 2008, 11:04 AM
Ian,
Im using email and message from the forum, go to my profile ,email me then I will get your correct email.
something not working right. send me a message as it seems to work on my end then I can email you in return. seems something not working right

greywolfretired
November 26th, 2008, 12:08 AM
Is it possible for someone to try this link and let me know if it works. There should be the tutorial that can be downloaded here.
Thanks


http://www.mediafire.com/?jtmoyzczmnz

rweber95
November 26th, 2008, 12:11 AM
It works.

Bob

greywolfretired
November 26th, 2008, 12:35 AM
Thank you, am redoing it but what is your opinion of it

greywolfretired
November 26th, 2008, 01:52 AM
Here is my old tutorial using surveyor. Am redoing it but some might find this one beneficial. This was made with trs06


http://www.mediafire.com/?jtmoyzczmnz

bl4882
November 26th, 2008, 05:13 AM
Hello Greywolfretired,

I downloaded your tutorial and it is very beneficial and timely for me. Thank you.

Bernie

greywolfretired
November 26th, 2008, 10:52 AM
Ian, I have put the tutorial up on this post. Scroll down and you should find it.
Let me know how it goes.