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ish6
December 3rd, 2006, 09:46 PM
Hi,

What is the purpose of a slug?

Thanks
Ish:)

sfrr
December 3rd, 2006, 10:03 PM
i'm pretty sure a slug is like a helper engine for the switching
this is off wika-pidia
"A railroad slug is an accessory to a diesle-electric locomotive. It has trucks with traction motors but is unable to move about under its own power, as it does not contain a prime mover to produce electricity. Instead, it is connected to a locomotive, called the mother, which provides current to operate the traction motors.
The slug concept is similar to switching from two wheel drive to four wheel drive in an automobile."

for example, there are cabless slugs, or a yard slug, there are also road slugs here is off wika-pidia agian --->

"Slugs are used in situations where tractive effort is more important than extra power, such as switching operations in yerds. At low speeds, a diesle-electric locomotive's prime mover can produce more electric power than its traction motors can use. Extra power would simply cause the wheels to slip and/or overheat the traction motors. A slug effectively adds axles to the locomotive, increasing both the pulling and braking power. Slugs carry ballast to increase their weight and improve traction. Large blocks of conctere are frequently used for this purpose, substituting for the weight of the now-absent diesel engine(s).
Slugs can be built new or converted from existing locomotives. Conversion has enjoyed popularity as a way to reuse otherwise obsolete engines."

here are pictures

first: a low slug, or cabless, or yard slug
http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r176/sfrr1/800px-Lowslug.jpg

second: a road slug, or railroad, or cabbed slug.
http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r176/sfrr1/780px-Highslug.jpg
hope thats what you wanted to know :)

mike

smash
December 3rd, 2006, 10:04 PM
To pour salt on.

Seriously to add weight without adding horspower. They are used when there is enough power but more weight is need to move something.
Kenny
SFRR beat me to it.

cathouse
December 4th, 2006, 11:48 AM
Or alternatively,they are slimy little pests that eat all your flowers and, as such,are absolutely no use whatsoever :D :D

cheers
Roy




lets bring some humour back to the forum.:cool:

sfrr
December 4th, 2006, 01:37 PM
SFRR beat me to it.


lol Smash...;)

tonyvdb
December 4th, 2006, 02:50 PM
i'm pretty sure a slug is like a helper engine for the switching
this is off wika-pidia
"A railroad slug is an accessory to a diesle-electric locomotive. It has trucks with traction motors but is unable to move about under its own power, as it does not contain a prime mover to produce electricity. Instead, it is connected to a locomotive, called the mother, which provides current to operate the traction motors.
The slug concept is similar to switching from two wheel drive to four wheel drive in an automobile."

for example, there are cabless slugs, or a yard slug, there are also road slugs here is off wika-pidia agian --->

"Slugs are used in situations where tractive effort is more important than extra power, such as switching operations in yerds. At low speeds, a diesle-electric locomotive's prime mover can produce more electric power than its traction motors can use. Extra power would simply cause the wheels to slip and/or overheat the traction motors. A slug effectively adds axles to the locomotive, increasing both the pulling and braking power. Slugs carry ballast to increase their weight and improve traction. Large blocks of conctere are frequently used for this purpose, substituting for the weight of the now-absent diesel engine(s).
Slugs can be built new or converted from existing locomotives. Conversion has enjoyed popularity as a way to reuse otherwise obsolete engines."


Yes, good description Sfrr,

I once saw two slugs placed in between two locomotives in our local CN switching yard. Slugs are most common in yards used to give that extra power, you will see them used with remote controlled switchers to shunt or just move fraight short distances at low speed.

lewisner
December 4th, 2006, 03:21 PM
You guys in the States live in Train Heaven.The only thing we ever had over here which resembled that was the Class 13 , which was two Class 08 350 Horsepower shunters permanently coupled and with the driving cab on one of them removed.They were known as Master and Slave units.:cool:

tommylommykins
December 4th, 2006, 03:50 PM
Nah, we wouldn't want slugs blubbering over our beloved rail network :p

tonyvdb
December 4th, 2006, 04:00 PM
Nah, we wouldn't want slugs blubbering over our beloved rail network :p
Gets rather slick and makes it hard to stop:rolleyes:

sfrr
December 4th, 2006, 04:55 PM
Yes, good description Sfrr.

thanks tonyvdb:)

P.S. lol tommylommykins:D

tonyvdb
December 4th, 2006, 05:10 PM
http://image48.webshots.com/49/4/44/79/338044479iTBKvQ_ph.jpgSlugs are also known as "Helpers"


http://rides.webshots.com/photo/1338044479028873452iTBKvQ

ish6
December 7th, 2006, 04:42 PM
Thanks to all who replied!!!

Ish:)

titaniclover
December 7th, 2006, 04:51 PM
i wonder if someone could make one it would be useful for a yard in routes.

smash
December 7th, 2006, 04:59 PM
There are some on the dls. Search for slug should give a couple results. One by sureshot, the others by cloakedghost275.
Kenny
http://www.auran.com/trainz/downloads/locomotives/kuid_76096_5734.jpg

trainzmainiac2006
December 7th, 2006, 05:05 PM
do they actually have an affect?

john

titaniclover
December 7th, 2006, 05:14 PM
not that im aware of but it will add a nice afect if you put it on a siding or you just want to waste space in the yard.

trainzmainiac2006
December 7th, 2006, 05:19 PM
could you give a kuid please? i get anyware between 3 and 400+ results.

thank you,
john

Midland
December 7th, 2006, 06:10 PM
About a year back I went through a phase of downloading all the glamorous looking slugs I could. Boy did they look neat in Railyard!:)

When I tried using them in Driver I had a top speed of about 8 mph. Seeing as locos are free in TRS I gave up using slugs and simply reverted to conventional locos in multiple. At least I was able to get my shunting done much more quickly that way.:rolleyes:

Slugs? Look good but are a real pain to use. Bung 'em in sidings or yards where they can act as decoration but if you want your yards to get sorted efficiently stick to conventional locos.

As for the stylommatophore variety they are incredibly useful (and delicious) if you happen to be an ericaneus europaeus (hedgehog). :D



Cheers

Nix

titaniclover
December 7th, 2006, 06:12 PM
i ment a yard that has a local yard off to the side of the main yard.

Tokkyu40
December 7th, 2006, 09:51 PM
Or you could slice them up and fry them.
Taste like chicken.:D

I think only the engine being operated does any real work. The rest are for show. I'm not sure, though, since I've never tested matching engines side by side.

:cool: Claude

Ferngren
December 8th, 2006, 01:28 AM
Trainzmaniac:

Effect ? yes, they are loco's without interior.

Midland
December 8th, 2006, 04:21 AM
Oh yes, don't get confused with "B" units. "B" units are fully functioning diesel electric locomotives that do not have a standard cab. They have minimal operating controls in a panel to allow movements in the depot and can move under their own power but are built to be used in multiple with cab fitted locos.

Slugs are two loco bogies with traction motors but no diesel engine to power them. The body is used merely to conceal large concrete blocks that provide weight for adhesion. The slug is coupled to a conventional diesel electric loco with the addition of an extra cable that takes power from the diesel generator of the main loco to feed to the traction motors of the slug. The diesel electric loco still puts out the same power but instead of being a Bo-Bo (for example) it becomes a Bo-Bo-Bo-Bo (if you can follow what I'm getting at). Because there are more traction motors and more wheels on the rails they are more sure-footed and useful for moving big heavy rakes (cuts) around the yard. By itself a slug is completely inert and immobile; it cannot move by itself.

The slugs in TRS do not add any power to the loco consist at all but they are more than just a wagon as they lock the maximum speed to a very low figure.

Here endeth the lesson...





Cheers

Nix

trainzmainiac2006
December 8th, 2006, 05:10 PM
kuid please?

john

Midland
December 8th, 2006, 07:38 PM
76096:5726
76096:5727
76096:5728
76096:5729
76096:5730
76096:5731
76096:5732
76096:5733
55290:5726
76096:5734
76096:526
76096:527
76096:528
76096:529

Enough? :)

Enjoy but don't expect high speed workouts. :D





Cheers

Nix

trainzmainiac2006
December 8th, 2006, 07:41 PM
thank you, i wont

john

bbarrier1
December 9th, 2006, 09:36 AM
CSXTs roadmates cut out at about 30 mph, there engine blocks replaced by a slab of concrete. They also have the capability to hold and transfer fuel on demand for the mother. I loved them for local service on a road switcher, since it made for a quiet ride while it was leading.:)

trainzmainiac2006
December 9th, 2006, 10:48 AM
by the way, the slugs only go 8 mph by themselves. with a loco, they can go a lot faster.

(They are designed to work with a locomotive.)

john

Harry_James_Potter
December 11th, 2006, 06:39 AM
Or alternatively,they are slimy little pests that eat all your flowers and, as such,are absolutely no use whatsoever :D :D

cheers
Roy




lets bring some humour back to the forum.:cool:

Or they're the test bed re-engined class 37s with either a Mirrlees 6-Cyl lump or a 6 Cyl Ruston Paxman lump. Known as slugs for their slow buildup of power...

regards

Harry

ish6
December 11th, 2006, 10:52 PM
Hi guys

Every time I saw real world trainz I never see a slug accompanied a long freight trainz ...

Ish

MrPopman
December 22nd, 2006, 11:14 PM
Every time I saw real world trainz I never see a slug accompanied a long freight trainz ...

In the real world they are only used in larger yards, or on short (low speed) hauls. For pulling freights on the main line, they are a liability. In a yard (as described above) they add tractive effort to start and stop a train without the additional expense of an extra prime mover (desiel engine) because the one prime mover can supply enough power for the traction moters of both units. On the main line (at speed) all of the power from the prime mover can be utilized by the traction units on its own engine, causing the slug to become dead weight that has to be pulled along.

rweber95
December 23rd, 2006, 03:27 AM
Most of CloakedGhosts slugs use his enginespec 76096:526 which has very little power. I ran it by itself and could only get about 10mph out of it. The config.txt file for the enginespec shows throttle position 8 starts at only 294 @ 0 and drops to 0 @ 4.5. I switched the enginespec to the same as a GP38 or SD40-2 and then it goes like a regular engine. I did a test comparing the performance pulling a 3000 ton consist with three SD40-2 locos vs one SD40-2 with two modified slugs and got the same results.

Bob

hogger1961
December 29th, 2006, 05:53 PM
Ask a question, get lots of info. Here is a little more.
Slugs are not limited to yard duty. Some are used as road slugs. They are coupled to the mother unit but are unpowered until extra force is needed, at which point the loco driver feeds the slug power until he is once again rolling. Then its unpowered again. This is more economical than sending extra locomotives that may only be needed to get the train moving. Some road slugs are built in the railroads shops, but some are purpose built for this type of use. General Electric builds them from scratch, and calls them "MATES". (Motor to Assist Tractive Effort). Or something to that effect. I dont know that road slugs would be much use in hilly terrain since extra locomotives are required anyway.
In addition to helping start a train, slugs add braking force as well. This extra force reduces shunting time since the loco driver can use a bit more speed without excess wheel slide and stopping distance. In a case where the railroad needs more brakes but doesn't need the starting force, the motors and other associated electrical equipment is removed (for use elsewhere) and the brake equipment is kept intact. The result is called a "sled". Alternatively, filling an old gondola car with cement make a good sled as well. I've seen it done.........
If you get some spare time, get on the 'net and type "locomotives" in your search engine. There is a ton of cool stuff there. Happy reading! Cheers, Ray

Harry_James_Potter
January 8th, 2007, 08:24 AM
The closest that we came to a Slug (US meaning) was an Ethel.

These were locos that were converted to provide train-heat only and ran in the 70s and 80s to provide electric train heat to trains in scotland that ran behind steam-heat only locos.

regards

Harry

BidMod
January 8th, 2007, 08:57 AM
The closest that we came to a Slug (US meaning) was an Ethel.

We also had two more nearly-slugs: braking tender (a kind of reverse-slug), and on hills we used banking locos (not exactly a slug, but useful with a heavy train).

Harry_James_Potter
January 8th, 2007, 09:33 AM
We also had two more nearly-slugs: braking tender (a kind of reverse-slug), and on hills we used banking locos (not exactly a slug, but useful with a heavy train).

braking tender (uk parlance) would be a sled (US parlance) and a banking loco here would be a Helper over there...

The only slugs we have are the 37/9s.

regards

Harry

WileeCoyote
January 8th, 2007, 10:29 AM
Who in their right mind would name a sort of "helper engine" after an ugly, slimy, flower ruining, disgusting, bad tasting thing that no one would ever want in their garden? Of the train form of slugs here in Germany I do not know of any, mostly if you want to move a load bigger than your switcher can handle you just get a more powerful engine like a V90.

WileeCoyote:D

ish6
January 26th, 2007, 08:01 AM
thanks for the replies ...:D

WileeCoyote
March 7th, 2007, 04:42 AM
Perhaps someone can benefit from this thread ....:D

Ish

Ah yes but how? So far I have found only two things, 1. slugs are unpowered helper engines that draw power off of a main engine, and 2. they are slimy disgusting things creeping over my flowers and garden railway that still don't taste good. Seriously, fry them in garlic oil or salt them they still taste pretty bad, and if you use too much salt they shrivel up and aren't at all juicy. That or I run them over with my bicycle:D .

WileeCoyote:D

kcdowdy
March 7th, 2007, 05:20 AM
a Slimy Disgusting creature that god placed on earth for people like me to tourture with salt and BB. guns.
LOL. Are we related???:D :eek: :cool: :) LOL!!

LoudTrain
March 7th, 2007, 12:13 PM
Were the old "B" units slugs, or did they have engines in them? (That shows MY ignorance!)

-- Russ

Harry_James_Potter
March 7th, 2007, 12:29 PM
Were the old "B" units slugs, or did they have engines in them? (That shows MY ignorance!)

-- Russ

They had engines but no cabs...

regards

Harry

Saieditor
March 8th, 2007, 03:50 AM
I seem to recall that Milwaukee Road had de-engined F7's with a block of concrete where the prime mover used to be and they did short helper duty on a small sub ... ran between GP38's or SD's.

goodell911
March 20th, 2007, 10:13 AM
http://www.trains.com/trn/default.aspx?c=a&id=203

ish6
March 20th, 2007, 10:55 PM
Ah yes but how? So far I have found only two things, 1. slugs are unpowered helper engines that draw power off of a main engine, and 2. they are slimy disgusting things creeping over my flowers and garden railway that still don't taste good. Seriously, fry them in garlic oil or salt them they still taste pretty bad, and if you use too much salt they shrivel up and aren't at all juicy. That or I run them over with my bicycle:D .

WileeCoyote:D

2 things are better than none ... :D :D

Tokkyu40
March 20th, 2007, 11:33 PM
Who in their right mind would name a sort of "helper engine" after an ugly, slimy, flower ruining, disgusting, bad tasting thing that no one would ever want in their garden? ...
WileeCoyote:D

According to Webster's New World Dictionary of the American Language, (College Edition, 1968) "slug" is from the Middle English "slugge", a slow or clumsy person or thing, and refers to a small, slow moving mollusc related to the land snail, or more loosely to any slow moving animal or vehicle. The same root gives the words "sluggish" and "slog".
An alternate source is from Middle Low German "slan", or slag, something struck off, as when forging metal. This is defined as a lump of metal, such as a bullet, or a plain metallic disk sometimes used in automatic coin-operated machines in place of money (don't do it!) and in this derivation would refer to a locomotive built as a motored weight which is otherwise inert until outside electricity is provided by the parent locomotive. This is my favorite theory.
The advantage of a slug is increased traction with lower operating and maintenance costs because of fewer engines to feed and repair. And without the engine, a slug can be built low enough to allow the engineer to easily see over the unit.
And that's definitely more than you wanted to know.:D

:cool: Claude

goodell911
March 21st, 2007, 08:02 AM
Here is a GREAT explaination of slugs...

http://www.trains.com/trn/default.aspx?c=a&id=203

butter
March 21st, 2007, 07:14 PM
ive never seen a slug or many trains a day exept when i go to fostoria ohio alsone know as
160 trains a day

butter
March 21st, 2007, 07:17 PM
there are a cople i know conrail for sure

sfrr
March 21st, 2007, 07:43 PM
this old thread? man it was atleast last year...

Harry_James_Potter
March 22nd, 2007, 05:00 AM
this old thread? man it was atleast last year...

It's not that old...

Besides, it's an interesting thread. For example, the UK definition of a slug is a class 37/9. these locos had EE 12CSVTs when built but were re-engined as test beds for both Ruston Paxman and Mirrlees. six were converted in all. 4 mirrlees and 2 Ruston Paxman.

The ruston paxman slugs can be differentiated by the fact they sound like Sulzers at idling but sound like True EEs when they are run up to full power.

regards

Harry

ish6
March 26th, 2007, 12:48 PM
anymore insights ...:D

butter
March 26th, 2007, 09:11 PM
just stupid little pests ...HEY every one who replid gets to find a slug and put it on the rr tracks and watch it suffer and then die and THE END

warzog
March 27th, 2007, 07:46 AM
Slugs that were patched with a SW-7/9/12/15 etc. were commonly called a 'Cow(the SW unit) and the Calf(the Slug unit)
As a FANatic about EMD's SW series of locomotives, I must correct this error.
The "COW" was the SW unit with the cab.
The "CALF" was a "B" unit, ie: a fully-functional locomotive, without a cab.

The Calf had a view panel that allowed the Cow's engineer to monitor it's engine, from his seat in the Cow.
Below this view panel was a control panel that could be used to start up the Calf seperately from the Cow.

Furthermore...
The Cow-Calf designations were only used in the "TR" or "transfer-locomotive" series.
The sets consisted of an "A" (cab) and "B" (cabless) units permanently coupled together.
(Although, they could be seperated for maintenance, or to utilize the Cow as a normal switcher.)
The models involved were:
TR1/2/3-NW2
TR4-SW7
TR5-SW9
TR6-SW8

The purpose of the "TR" series was to give railroads a "single" locomotive, that could replace some of the larger 8-wheeled steam switchers of the period.
The TR series could be ordered with dual-controls, which allowed the engineer to run the locomotive in either direction, with an appropriately facing set of controls.
With but one cab, the view would be unobstructed, as it would be if two switchers were mu'd together.
One little-known fact about EMD's switchers, they could be ordered with dynamic brakes, (Lehigh Valley's SW8's had DB's,) although I don't believe any of the TR series were ever delivered with them.

ish6
May 9th, 2007, 12:46 PM
As a FANatic about EMD's SW series of locomotives, I must correct this error.
The "COW" was the SW unit with the cab.
The "CALF" was a "B" unit, ie: a fully-functional locomotive, without a cab.

The Calf had a view panel that allowed the Cow's engineer to monitor it's engine, from his seat in the Cow.
Below this view panel was a control panel that could be used to start up the Calf seperately from the Cow.

Furthermore...
The Cow-Calf designations were only used in the "TR" or "transfer-locomotive" series.
The sets consisted of an "A" (cab) and "B" (cabless) units permanently coupled together.
(Although, they could be seperated for maintenance, or to utilize the Cow as a normal switcher.)
The models involved were:
TR1/2/3-NW2
TR4-SW7
TR5-SW9
TR6-SW8

The purpose of the "TR" series was to give railroads a "single" locomotive, that could replace some of the larger 8-wheeled steam switchers of the period.
The TR series could be ordered with dual-controls, which allowed the engineer to run the locomotive in either direction, with an appropriately facing set of controls.
With but one cab, the view would be unobstructed, as it would be if two switchers were mu'd together.
One little-known fact about EMD's switchers, they could be ordered with dynamic brakes, (Lehigh Valley's SW8's had DB's,) although I don't believe any of the TR series were ever delivered with them.

Excellent .... thanks for the insights ...:D

Rc1166
May 9th, 2007, 12:58 PM
The UP TR5s had dynamic brakes when they where used as helpers on Cajun pass.

WileeCoyote
May 10th, 2007, 10:53 AM
According to Webster's New World Dictionary of the American Language, (College Edition, 1968) "slug" is from the Middle English "slugge", a slow or clumsy person or thing, and refers to a small, slow moving mollusc related to the land snail, or more loosely to any slow moving animal or vehicle. The same root gives the words "sluggish" and "slog".
An alternate source is from Middle Low German "slan", or slag, something struck off, as when forging metal. This is defined as a lump of metal, such as a bullet, or a plain metallic disk sometimes used in automatic coin-operated machines in place of money (don't do it!) and in this derivation would refer to a locomotive built as a motored weight which is otherwise inert until outside electricity is provided by the parent locomotive. This is my favorite theory.
The advantage of a slug is increased traction with lower operating and maintenance costs because of fewer engines to feed and repair. And without the engine, a slug can be built low enough to allow the engineer to easily see over the unit.
And that's definitely more than you wanted to know.:D

:cool: Claude

That is more than I really wanted to know, especially when I just ate one of these buggers (fried in garlic oil, mmmmmm, tastes like chicken) that was leaving slime all over a switch on my garden layout. My definition of slugs: That which God hath created to be run over by bicycles and salted till it tastes like the contents of those colourful plastic bags with the word "Lays" on them.

WileeCoyote:D

Midland
May 10th, 2007, 03:43 PM
WileeCoyote, I am sure you're a really nice chap who loves his parents etc; I'm equally sure your views on slugs would be totally different if you were one! :D

I don't know about the taste of them; like slugs I too am vegetarian! :D



Cheers

Nix

WileeCoyote
May 11th, 2007, 02:01 AM
HA! You actually think I ate one of them?!?!?!? Pbslt, fat chance, I'll sooner eat some snails fried in garlic oil next time I go to France (which will probably never happen).

WileeCoyote:D

smash
May 28th, 2007, 04:46 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y5rBMsTcMKg
I beleive this is a road slug.
Kenny

ish6
June 7th, 2007, 02:18 PM
The UP TR5s had dynamic brakes when they where used as helpers on Cajun pass.

Good info there ... :)

ish6
August 3rd, 2007, 12:37 PM
edit

Thanks!:wave:

ish6
August 28th, 2007, 08:28 AM
About a year back I went through a phase of downloading all the glamorous looking slugs I could. Boy did they look neat in Railyard!:)

When I tried using them in Driver I had a top speed of about 8 mph. Seeing as locos are free in TRS I gave up using slugs and simply reverted to conventional locos in multiple. At least I was able to get my shunting done much more quickly that way.:rolleyes:

Slugs? Look good but are a real pain to use. Bung 'em in sidings or yards where they can act as decoration but if you want your yards to get sorted efficiently stick to conventional locos.

As for the stylommatophore variety they are incredibly useful (and delicious) if you happen to be an ericaneus europaeus (hedgehog). :D



Cheers

Nix

Thanks for your input ... :)

ish6
November 20th, 2007, 08:11 PM
i'm pretty sure a slug is like a helper engine for the switching
this is off wika-pidia
"A railroad slug is an accessory to a diesle-electric locomotive. It has trucks with traction motors but is unable to move about under its own power, as it does not contain a prime mover to produce electricity. Instead, it is connected to a locomotive, called the mother, which provides current to operate the traction motors.
The slug concept is similar to switching from two wheel drive to four wheel drive in an automobile."

for example, there are cabless slugs, or a yard slug, there are also road slugs here is off wika-pidia agian --->

"Slugs are used in situations where tractive effort is more important than extra power, such as switching operations in yerds. At low speeds, a diesle-electric locomotive's prime mover can produce more electric power than its traction motors can use. Extra power would simply cause the wheels to slip and/or overheat the traction motors. A slug effectively adds axles to the locomotive, increasing both the pulling and braking power. Slugs carry ballast to increase their weight and improve traction. Large blocks of conctere are frequently used for this purpose, substituting for the weight of the now-absent diesel engine(s).
Slugs can be built new or converted from existing locomotives. Conversion has enjoyed popularity as a way to reuse otherwise obsolete engines."

here are pictures

first: a low slug, or cabless, or yard slug
http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r176/sfrr1/800px-Lowslug.jpg

second: a road slug, or railroad, or cabbed slug.
http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r176/sfrr1/780px-Highslug.jpg
hope thats what you wanted to know :)

mike

Thank you!!:wave:
Ish

ish6
November 22nd, 2007, 10:03 AM
Ask a question, get lots of info. Here is a little more.
Slugs are not limited to yard duty. Some are used as road slugs. They are coupled to the mother unit but are unpowered until extra force is needed, at which point the loco driver feeds the slug power until he is once again rolling. Then its unpowered again. This is more economical than sending extra locomotives that may only be needed to get the train moving. Some road slugs are built in the railroads shops, but some are purpose built for this type of use. General Electric builds them from scratch, and calls them "MATES". (Motor to Assist Tractive Effort). Or something to that effect. I dont know that road slugs would be much use in hilly terrain since extra locomotives are required anyway.
In addition to helping start a train, slugs add braking force as well. This extra force reduces shunting time since the loco driver can use a bit more speed without excess wheel slide and stopping distance. In a case where the railroad needs more brakes but doesn't need the starting force, the motors and other associated electrical equipment is removed (for use elsewhere) and the brake equipment is kept intact. The result is called a "sled". Alternatively, filling an old gondola car with cement make a good sled as well. I've seen it done.........
If you get some spare time, get on the 'net and type "locomotives" in your search engine. There is a ton of cool stuff there. Happy reading! Cheers, Ray

Thank you for the info!!:hehe: :D

ish6
March 15th, 2008, 12:17 AM
"Slugs are used in situations where tractive effort is more important than extra power, such as switching operations in yerds. At low speeds, a diesle-electric locomotive's prime mover can produce more electric power than its traction motors can use. Extra power would simply cause the wheels to slip and/or overheat the traction motors. A slug effectively adds axles to the locomotive, increasing both the pulling and braking power. Slugs carry ballast to increase their weight and improve traction. Large blocks of conctere are frequently used for this purpose, substituting for the weight of the now-absent diesel engine(s).
Slugs can be built new or converted from existing locomotives. Conversion has enjoyed popularity as a way to reuse otherwise obsolete engines."


Thanks Mike:wave: :p

steamboateng
March 15th, 2008, 08:58 AM
Locate 12 oz. can of beer(your choice). Consume half (fortify yourself for this heartless task). Pour remainder in a small bowl. Place bowl in garden.
Slug(s) like beer............ will drink...........will thoroughly inebriate themselves..........will fall into beer..........will drown!
Have significant other remove this mess from the garden after several days.
Regards
P.S. I found Slug topic(railroad kind) quite interesting. The Boston and Maine (now Guilford) operated these puppies in the Boston area.

ish6
March 21st, 2008, 02:38 PM
not that im aware of but it will add a nice afect if you put it on a siding or you just want to waste space in the yard.

Yeah, agreed:hehe:

freightcar2
June 9th, 2008, 08:47 PM
"Slug"...bad name...those creepy creatures make me shiver.:o :o :o

Andysim212
June 10th, 2008, 05:34 AM
I know its not a slug (its a snail 46 seconds) but it could easily be replaced by said slug :D .

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=zCrHwqGfkYs
Funny Vid anway

And a rocket powered slugg
http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=ey6NQbIhhFc&feature=related

Anyone spot the loco further up the line? Any ideas?

Tokkyu40
June 13th, 2008, 08:16 AM
I think the second video was testing a nuclear fuel container. For some reason they didn't want it to rupture or leak in an accident.
As for the first; if you're going to abuse cars, try this;
http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=24iZDl-U8es&feature=related

As for the slugs, have we done a complete list of manufactureres yet? EMD has been well documented here, and GE made the MATE (Motors for Additional Tractive Effort) to go with the U36B, but how abiout Alco and Baldwin?

:cool: Claude

ish6
June 13th, 2008, 01:51 PM
I think the second video was testing a nuclear fuel container. For some reason they didn't want it to rupture or leak in an accident.
As for the first; if you're going to abuse cars, try this;
http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=24iZDl-U8es&feature=related

As for the slugs, have we done a complete list of manufactureres yet? EMD has been well documented here, and GE made the MATE (Motors for Additional Tractive Effort) to go with the U36B, but how abiout Alco and Baldwin?

:cool: Claude

Cool!!! :D

Iced8383
June 13th, 2008, 02:12 PM
uuuuuuuuuuuuhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh:sleep: :sleep: :udrool: :mop: :o

freightcar2
June 14th, 2008, 01:52 AM
Slugs make me feel sick.:'( :o :eek: :( :sleep: :mop: :p :n:

bigfitzy
June 14th, 2008, 05:20 AM
Slugs make me feel sick.:'( :o :eek: :( :sleep: :mop: :p :n:

SLUGS???? mmm thems good eatin. :hehe: chewy with a soft squishy centre.

feelin queasy yet ? lol

freightcar2
June 15th, 2008, 11:15 AM
Or alternatively,they are slimy little pests that eat all your flowers and, as such,are absolutely no use whatsoever :D :D

cheers
Roy




lets bring some humour back to the forum.:cool:



:hehe: :hehe: :hehe: :hehe: :hehe: :hehe: :hehe:

Tokkyu40
June 16th, 2008, 09:06 AM
Freightcar2, if that's your signature, you seriously need to crop and shrink the picture. It's overwhelming.

:cool: Claude

Tokkyu40
June 17th, 2008, 09:50 PM
Thanks for taking care of it so quick. :wave: Now we can focus on your posts better.
Except for the size, it was a great picture. I can't wait to see what your final signature image will be like.

:cool: Claude

Thomas_The_Tank100
June 18th, 2008, 12:11 PM
A third definition is the D51-type steam locomotive built for the Japanese National Railway. According to Wikipedia: "Early D51s built were known as 'Namekuji type' (or 'slug (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slug)')" There are about 18 surviving in Japan and at least 4 in Russia.
There are 18 more definitions here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slug_%28disambiguation%29).
~TTT100~

freightcar2
June 18th, 2008, 12:52 PM
Thanks for taking care of it so quick. :wave: Now we can focus on your posts better.
Except for the size, it was a great picture. I can't wait to see what your final signature image will be like.

:cool: Claude

Not to get too offtopic, but my new sig will be something from trainz: perhaps the R30s and R32s side by side? :o That's yet to be confirmed.

ish6
August 11th, 2008, 01:50 PM
A third definition is the D51-type steam locomotive built for the Japanese National Railway. According to Wikipedia: "Early D51s built were known as 'Namekuji type' (or 'slug (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slug)')" There are about 18 surviving in Japan and at least 4 in Russia.
There are 18 more definitions here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slug_%28disambiguation%29).
~TTT100~

Thanks ... :wave:

ish6
December 14th, 2009, 05:02 PM
Update for a few out there ... :hehe: :wave:

Ish

ish6
December 14th, 2009, 05:07 PM
Now Available from TrainzProRoutes

http://forums.auran.com/trainz/showthread.php?t=49493

Thanks Shane!!! :wave:

Ish

cascaderailroad
December 14th, 2009, 06:44 PM
The lowly, detestable, disgusting, slimey, slug...they like beer (though don't waste the good Tooheys on them). A saucer full of stale brewsky in your garden will get rid of them (they are apparently uncontrollable alco-holics). No matter how putrid of a mollusk they are...the day you take and shake a salt shaker on a group of them in the night, and watch the horrid spectacle unfold, it will shock you so, and you will forever swear off cruelty to animals, and will be forever be kind to lower forms of life.