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View Full Version : Train Town - FREE 7 day beta on Android, get it now!



n3vgames
June 4th, 2014, 10:18 PM
http://trainzworldbuilderjr.trainzportal.com/images/post-1.jpg
If you have an android device (tablet or phone) feel free to download the latest version of Train Town and give it a try: beta-build-latest-public.apk (http://trainzworldbuilderjr.trainzportal.com/builds/beta-build-latest-public.apk) (version 0.9)

Pladroid
June 4th, 2014, 11:02 PM
Hi will this work on a Kindle-fire tablet?

Zeldaboy14
June 4th, 2014, 11:44 PM
Wish I had an Android Device. I'd get it right away.

pdkoester
June 5th, 2014, 01:03 AM
Samsung Galaxy S3...

RRSignal
June 5th, 2014, 01:15 AM
What happens after 7 days? I'm not going to install something that will just stop working at some point.

oknotsen
June 5th, 2014, 01:56 AM
So everyone got this? There I was thinking I was special for about 4 seconds ;).
Sorry, no android; will see if I can find someone who has and is interested.

I'm not going to install something that will just stop working at some point.You mean like with just about every piece of software? :P :hehe: Be happy that you got a estimate about it this time ;).

pdkoester
June 5th, 2014, 07:22 AM
Samsung Galaxy S3...

Sigh, what a waste of time. Sorry, I didn't like it at all. It would definitely be for kids, that do have a lot of patience. Whatever...

Paul

Blackie11
June 5th, 2014, 08:00 AM
Full of hope when I installed it, within 2 minutes it was asking me for money to be able to choose buildings to place on the track, definitely NOT for children and what a scam, try out a beta indeed. Not worth the effort of downloading, in-app purchases already in the game!

Very disappointed,
Dave

shaneturner12
June 5th, 2014, 08:55 AM
Full of hope when I installed it, within 2 minutes it was asking me for money to be able to choose buildings to place on the track, definitely NOT for children and what a scam, try out a beta indeed. Not worth the effort of downloading, in-app purchases already in the game!

Very disappointed,
Dave

To be fair to N3V, most Android (and even IOS and Facebook developers) include in-app purchases as a way of financing the product.

Shane

Blackie11
June 5th, 2014, 09:23 AM
Shane,

I agree, that may be so, but not in the Beta! Generally there is a warning, particularly when the product is aimed at children.

That is my .02 cents worth, I will leave it at that.

Regards,

Dave

RRSignal
June 5th, 2014, 09:59 AM
You mean like with just about every piece of software? :P :hehe: Be happy that you got a estimate about it this time ;).

You mean like hardly any consumer software, until the past few years!

Meh, judging by the early reviews, it's not worth it anyway, lol. Plus, I'd be using the wifey's phone, and getting that thing away from her is a game all by itself! :)

Tony_Hilliam
June 5th, 2014, 04:58 PM
Meh, judging by the early reviews, it's not worth it anyway
Always looking on the bright side of things aren't you ;)

As the introduction stated, this product isn't aimed at our core Trainz Simulator audience. One review says "It would definitely be for kids" which is exactly who the product is aimed at (so we take that as a positive rather than negative).

The other talks about in-app purchases like they are the devil. We haven't decided on the final business model, but at some point money needs to change hands to pay for the product. On 90% of mobile products these days, that money changes hands after the product is installed.

The interesting thing is that people walk into a shop and there are hundreds (or thousands) of items for sale. Yet I have never once heard anyone say "I'm outta here - they want me to buy all this stuff - it would cost me thousands to buy everything and all I wanted was a chocolate bar."

With mobile products, you get to walk into the shop (download the game) and even eat chocolate (play the base game) for as long as you like. If you want anything other than chocolate, you have to pay. No-one accuses a shop keeper of being a thief for selling more than one item in his store.

boyerm25
June 5th, 2014, 05:16 PM
I don't know, something in me just prefers paying for the base game and then knowing I won't have to pay anything else afterwards.

RRSignal
June 5th, 2014, 05:27 PM
Always looking on the bright side of things aren't you ;)

As the introduction stated, this product isn't aimed at our core Trainz Simulator audience. One review says "It would definitely be for kids" which is exactly who the product is aimed at (so we take that as a positive rather than negative).

Sorry, didn't mean to be a pain. It's a non-starter for me because, as I'm sure you know all-too-well from the DRM threads, I'm not interested in software or content that can be disabled or that can disable itself at some point, whatever the reason or cause.


The other talks about in-app purchases like they are the devil. We haven't decided on the final business model, but at some point money needs to change hands to pay for the product. On 90% of mobile products these days, that money changes hands after the product is installed.

The interesting thing is that people walk into a shop and there are hundreds (or thousands) of items for sale. Yet I have never once heard anyone say "I'm outta here - they want me to buy all this stuff - it would cost me thousands to buy everything and all I wanted was a chocolate bar."

With mobile products, you get to walk into the shop (download the game) and even eat chocolate (play the base game) for as long as you like. If you want anything other than chocolate, you have to pay. No-one accuses a shop keeper of being a thief for selling more than one item in his store.


Not a great analogy, but I don't mind the monetization. Frankly, anyone dumb enough to give a kid a cellphone which allows them to install paid content, in-game widgets, etc., or who fails to properly supervise them, deserves whatever happens. You wouldn't give your kid your credit card or a checkbook full of signed blanks, would you? :eek:

pdkoester
June 5th, 2014, 09:43 PM
The interesting thing is that people walk into a shop and there are hundreds (or thousands) of items for sale. Yet I have never once heard anyone say "I'm outta here - they want me to buy all this stuff - it would cost me thousands to buy everything and all I wanted was a chocolate bar."


Just so I can understand, what kind of shop do you go to that would have "add-on" things you pay for to go with that chocolate bar? LOL
You cannot compare a chocolate bar in this example, to me. I'm sorry, but that is the way I see it.

Paul

Tony_Hilliam
June 5th, 2014, 10:05 PM
what kind of shop do you go to that would have "add-on" things you pay for
Paul
I can think of a very obvious one ... ever been to McDonalds Paul? "Would you like fries with that?" Every meal served in Maccas requires the offer of an upsell add-on. Moving away from food, how long since you bought a car? Yours for only $9999... until you want the parking sensor, rear mirror gizmo, low profile tyres ... that will be $14,990 for your $10k car thank you very much!

I'm not trying to convert anyone here, but the discussion of pay first, add-ons later, free to play and so on, fascinates me.

Digital content is still something the human brain struggles to come to terms with. We have spent millenia developing an understanding of the value of physical items that are created by physical actions. Until a few hundred years ago, one person could make one thing at a time. Machines then started making lots of things at a time, but it still required time and effort to create something new. Now we have digital content which is easily replicated and easily delivered via the internet. This has changed the whole concept of "value" and it will be a long time before everyone gets the message and understands it.

If the add-on item for your mobile game came wrapped up in a box in the mail, no-one would have any problems in paying for it. But since this add-on content appears at the tap of a screen (and a deduction from a credit card that Apple or Google have on file) it should be free right?

Anyway, the offer of a free beta test remains to those who don't mind having fun FREE for a week with something that is likely to cost them money if they want to have the same amount of fun next week :)

perry_weekley
June 6th, 2014, 12:49 AM
I'm an Iphone fiend so I can't try this out but what even drew me here after seeing it was Android was the fact it's named Train Town. My last experience with Train Town was in the early 2000's after a few years of playing it on my PC. I quite enjoyed what Sierra games did even if some of it was tongue in cheek humor. While I doubt this is the same brand let alone the same company making it, Sierra has been gone for a long time, it still remains that I'm curious if naming a new product something so similar to a past, and successful one, is a good idea.

Also the N needs to be in front of the I in your logo. It is the only letter not covered by the next and that makes the letter stick out more in a bad way.

Anyway, I wish Auran the best with their new endeavors into micro transactions and I hope this appeals well to a younger audience.

AntonyVW
June 6th, 2014, 01:04 AM
Downloaded onto Galaxy S3. My grandson is going to love this one.

captainkman
June 6th, 2014, 02:09 AM
For those without an Android device, or people with one too old to update to the latest version of the Operating System (like my HTC Wildfire), I am currently checking out an emulator called BlueStacks. This emulator basically allows you to run Android applications on your computer, with an Android-style interface. BlueStacks is even compatible with the Google Play store!

I have used it previously with apps such as Angry Birds and Fruit Ninja, that have been updated too far for my device to be able to download them.

I am going to see if I can have the same success in BlueStacks with Train Town. :)

EDIT: I can now confirm that Train Town works with BlueStacks App Player!

Kieran.

captainkman
June 8th, 2014, 02:12 AM
I thought you all might be interested in proof of Train Town running on BlueStacks App Player. :)

http://hostthenpost.org/uploads/dbea62cd0eb33a7d3863a1b8eb157980.png (http://hostthenpost.org)

It's a great way to go if you don't have an Android device or have one that's too old.

The trains are from 'Turbo Trainz', N3V's Wii console game.

Kieran.

GDennish
June 8th, 2014, 10:53 PM
May I ask why you changed the wheel textures for Veteran?

Wii Variant:


http://i.imgur.com/Ly0qmgO.png

Android:

http://i.imgur.com/jEsyH11.png

The Wii wheel textures look much better.

There is also a UV error on the wheels also.

http://i.imgur.com/9MCilGO.png

I've seen the artist you guys asked to make these models, but why change it if it was correct the first time?

KingConrail76
June 11th, 2014, 12:18 AM
Always looking on the bright side of things aren't you ;)

As the introduction stated, this product isn't aimed at our core Trainz Simulator audience. One review says "It would definitely be for kids" which is exactly who the product is aimed at (so we take that as a positive rather than negative).

The other talks about in-app purchases like they are the devil. We haven't decided on the final business model, but at some point money needs to change hands to pay for the product. On 90% of mobile products these days, that money changes hands after the product is installed.

The interesting thing is that people walk into a shop and there are hundreds (or thousands) of items for sale. Yet I have never once heard anyone say "I'm outta here - they want me to buy all this stuff - it would cost me thousands to buy everything and all I wanted was a chocolate bar."

With mobile products, you get to walk into the shop (download the game) and even eat chocolate (play the base game) for as long as you like. If you want anything other than chocolate, you have to pay. No-one accuses a shop keeper of being a thief for selling more than one item in his store.


All due respect Tony, but I think it is you who are not understanding the concerns of your commenters...
--You have a product aimed at young Teen, and more likely, PRE teen CHILDREN which offers and entices in-app purchases BY those MINOR CHILDREN.

I'd get yourself prepared for a lot of Charge-Backs by angry Parents.

I doubt very much that any adults here, would, or do, have a problem with making in-app purchases, that they themselves, as ADULTS, made the decision to purchase and pay for...
--I think you're way off base, and somewhat insulting to your adult forum members who have participated in this conversation, by making comments that indicate "we" are a bunch of "gimme for free" ingrates.

Blackie11 is correct, "Beta" versions of Apps, regardless of future implementation, generally have the "in-app purchase" options disabled. This is what YOU advertised, a "Beta" version, free to use for testing purposes.
--If you don't want to hear the critical reviews of those who expected to get what you advertised, maybe you should have just put out a "trial" version, with paid upgrade (This is actually the "standard practice" in the App world, by the way), rather than a "BETA" version...

amigacooke
June 11th, 2014, 02:01 AM
My problem with this model is that you do not know how much it is going to cost you. I would prefer to download a 'demo' to see if it is a game I'd like to spend money on then have an in app purchase for the full cost.

I downloaded the mobile version of Dungeon Keeper and shortly after deleted it again when it became clear the game was unplayable without a constant injection of cash.

Tony_Hilliam
June 11th, 2014, 02:21 AM
I'm sorry if I came across harshly towards anyone - text doesn't have "tone" attached to soften any of the words. I know there are many different business models and that it is different with kids vs teens vs adults. Our audience here are not likely to have access to a credit card, so any purchase will be by asking Mom or Dad to buy them some extras. They bought them the app in the first place, so making another purchase is what parents do (of course they won't all agree, but not all will say no either).

With the free trial + full price upgrade, the problem lies in the length and breadth of the trial offering (and results in "you only get X minutes" type complaints). We have tried the full price + no in-app purchases (My First Trainz Set), full price + in-app (Trainz Driver and Trainz Simulator), unlimited free trial and pay for more content (Trainz Trouble), time limit free trial and pay to unlock the full game (Trainz Driver Android). The market is constantly changing and different games also require different approaches. The good thing is that we have options available and if we don't get it right first time, we can tweak things later.

Oh, and by the way, you can now pay $2.99 for "Train Town" on Google Play (https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.n3vgames.trainzforkidz) and play it forever without spending anything extra. You get to use additional content for free for various time limits, and decide whether you want to pay for the extras at any time in the future. (Link might take an hour or so to activate).

shaneturner12
June 11th, 2014, 02:46 AM
Tony - I'm hoping that the Train Town app has some form of requirement for the parent to authorise such in-app payments, as I know Apple ended up with big problems not too long ago and had to refund a lot of people after some form of lawsuit after their children ran up large bills, and it's likely that some parents set up their card details on their Google Wallet account.

It's a slippery slope offering in-app purchases for games aimed at children as there isn't a lot to prevent them running up large bills through such purchases.

Just my two cents.


Shane

Tony_Hilliam
June 11th, 2014, 03:53 AM
I totally understand the sentiment although there isn't much the developer can do. Transactions are all handled by the store. In a major step forward, Apple just implemented family sharing... (http://www.apple.com/ios/ios8/family-sharing/) which solves a lot of the problems that were being caused by ensuring the "master account" is always notified prior to a purchase being made.

shaneturner12
June 11th, 2014, 03:57 AM
Perhaps it may be worth seeing if there's something in the Android API system (or something Google can do) that works in a similar way in that case, if only to avoid problems later.

Shane

phimat
June 11th, 2014, 04:48 AM
Really scraping the bottom of the barrel with this one. Next we'll have porn ads...

But one question: Why, if IoS app sells better than Andy for adults, do you aim for Andy children rather than IoS children. Will they be more easily suckered by your scam? Are Andy parents less caring of their children? (Or are there simply more children in that cohort?)

amigacooke
June 11th, 2014, 05:18 AM
Really scraping the bottom of the barrel with this one. Next we'll have porn ads...

Oooooh naked trains! Look at the rust on that one!

*rushes off to have cooling oil shower*

Tony_Hilliam
June 11th, 2014, 06:04 AM
Really scraping the bottom of the barrel with this one. Next we'll have porn ads...

But one question: Why, if IoS app sells better than Andy for adults, do you aim for Andy children rather than IoS children. Will they be more easily suckered by your scam? Are Andy parents less caring of their children? (Or are there simply more children in that cohort?)

iOS release relies on the Apple approval process while there is no process at Google Play so (as stated in the article on the home page) iOS is likely to be next week, so unfortunately there is no conspiracy theory regarding parent attitudes to their children based upon hardware choice. :)

What I would really love to know is exactly what barrel you think we are scraping here. Are you talking the focus of the product (kids)? The business model (which may well be modified in the future)? Is it that you see child-focused app less worthy of attention than a simulator? And how does any of this relate to porn ads?

Is your concern that we might make money? or lose money? I wonder which option would concern you more?

I would also love to understand more your concept of scam. In what way is a product which is sold at a known price with the clear statement regarding "Offers in-app purchases" for totally optional extras a "scam"? Surely there has to be hidden elements to qualify as a scam?

Are buyers of Trainz Driver or Trainz Sim for mobile being similarly scammed? The business model is pretty much identical. The vast majority of apps these days are based upon in-app purchases so perhaps all apps are scams?

Please feel free to continue the discussion because I am totally puzzled as to the nature of the hostility towards a really fun product (although perhaps you haven't tried it to find out?).

KingConrail76
June 11th, 2014, 04:27 PM
I'm sorry if I came across harshly towards anyone - text doesn't have "tone" attached to soften any of the words. I know there are many different business models and that it is different with kids vs teens vs adults. Our audience here are not likely to have access to a credit card, so any purchase will be by asking Mom or Dad to buy them some extras. They bought them the app in the first place, so making another purchase is what parents do (of course they won't all agree, but not all will say no either).
..snip..


Tony, Thank you for addressing my summation, and clarifying your thoughts on the responsibility of payment.

phimat
June 12th, 2014, 04:47 AM
iOS release relies on the Apple approval process while there is no process at Google Play so (as stated in the article on the home page) iOS is likely to be next week, so unfortunately there is no conspiracy theory regarding parent attitudes to their children based upon hardware choice. :)

What I would really love to know is exactly what barrel you think we are scraping here. Are you talking the focus of the product (kids)? The business model (which may well be modified in the future)? Is it that you see child-focused app less worthy of attention than a simulator? And how does any of this relate to porn ads?

Is your concern that we might make money? or lose money? I wonder which option would concern you more?

I would also love to understand more your concept of scam. In what way is a product which is sold at a known price with the clear statement regarding "Offers in-app purchases" for totally optional extras a "scam"? Surely there has to be hidden elements to qualify as a scam?

Are buyers of Trainz Driver or Trainz Sim for mobile being similarly scammed? The business model is pretty much identical. The vast majority of apps these days are based upon in-app purchases so perhaps all apps are scams?

Please feel free to continue the discussion because I am totally puzzled as to the nature of the hostility towards a really fun product (although perhaps you haven't tried it to find out?).

This kind of marketing plays upon the vulnerability and naivety of children. The point is that parents will feel pressured into paying for extra products that are little more than passing novelties to children. Think sweet racks at supermarket checkouts. All apps that do this are scams.

If it is such an honest marketing strategy, why don't you introduce it to the adult versions (the business models are not identical, as you well know)?

KingConrail76
June 12th, 2014, 10:03 PM
This kind of marketing plays upon the vulnerability and naivety of children. The point is that parents will feel pressured into paying for extra products that are little more than passing novelties to children. Think sweet racks at supermarket checkouts. All apps that do this are scams.

If it is such an honest marketing strategy, why don't you introduce it to the adult versions (the business models are not identical, as you well know)?

To be fair, they have, in the form of DLC $$ add-on content for all versions of Trainz.

Tony_Hilliam
June 12th, 2014, 10:41 PM
Phimat, I don't think you're going to convince me that creating a product for children is a bad idea nor that asking for money in return for people using the product is a bad idea either.

Sweets last for mere moments, while an app like Train Town can provide hours of enjoyment.

We've also decided to launch with a slight variation on the free trial so unlike sweets, you get a bag of sweet gameplay for free and you can get more every day for free.

If you own an Android device, you can now download the product for free and play it free forever. You can even enjoy content you haven't paid for but only for a limited time in each session.

phimat
June 13th, 2014, 04:56 AM
Phimat, I don't think you're going to convince me that creating a product for children is a bad idea nor that asking for money in return for people using the product is a bad idea either.

Sweets last for mere moments, while an app like Train Town can provide hours of enjoyment.

We've also decided to launch with a slight variation on the free trial so unlike sweets, you get a bag of sweet gameplay for free and you can get more every day for free.

If you own an Android device, you can now download the product for free and play it free forever. You can even enjoy content you haven't paid for but only for a limited time in each session.

Not trying to convince you of anything. Leave that to your own conscience.

Btw checked PlayStore. Uploads +1. Only three comments, one by yourself. Oh dear...

Tony_Hilliam
June 13th, 2014, 05:54 AM
My conscience is quite clear. We have invested in creating a product where we think there is an audience who will appreciate it. Clearly you aren't one of those, but you seem quite persistent in trying to find every negative response possible to throw at us.

Google Play algorithms take a while to populate - it still says "Not yet rated" in one part of the Train Town page while it shows 6 reviews in another (all 5 star btw).

I am not sure which account you think I have used to comment. Certainly not Ethan Nazareth who quoted "Epic In my opinion , i like this more than i like trainz" - unless of course you think I spend my time reviewing 100 other apps so that I can review our own app highly ... here is Ethans profile: https://play.google.com/store/people/details?id=100867563040691052310.

Are we expecting this product to be bigger than Trainz Sim? No. Do we believe there is an audience? Yes.

Since you have invested considerable time in the debate, can I ask if you have an Android device and if you have tried the app? If so I would be very interested in what you find good/bad or indifferent about the product (even though, I assume, you aren't in our target demographic).

trainman7616
June 13th, 2014, 07:25 AM
I dont see why people are getting all butthurt over this. If you dont like the game then shut up about it and dont play and if you do like then keep playing. Its that simple.

boleyd
June 13th, 2014, 08:50 AM
Why don't you get revenue in another manner. Why not offer a few levels of contribution from existing customers and a discount coupon for that amount when the new program is available NO development costs to cover and borrowing money at zero interest. So if I sent you $5.00US to help cover the development costs of the new program you would give me a $5.00US discount when I bought it. If I failed to buy it then you keep the $5.00. With this scheme you depend on the goodwill of the existing customers. There is the added benefit of gauging the market minus the hard cases who would not give you a dime until they see the "goods". Unless you can go the the "window" at the USA Federal Reserve you won't get cheaper money, while discounting an internal charge for managing the pre-payment process. Oh, there are no ongoing support costs...... And there is NO out-of-pocket costs when you allow me to download the new program. Discount programs on "none material" products can be beneficial.

There is so much CRAP on the Internet that your product marketing is benign compared to some.

amigacooke
June 13th, 2014, 10:20 AM
Why don't you get revenue in another manner. Why not offer a few levels of contribution from existing customers and a discount coupon for that amount when the new program is available NO development costs to cover and borrowing money at zero interest. So if I sent you $5.00US to help cover the development costs of the new program you would give me a $5.00US discount when I bought it. It might have a few more bells and whistles, but isn't that what KickStarter and similar schemes do?

boleyd
June 13th, 2014, 11:56 AM
The pledge system is complex in terms of its "rewards". You want a scheme that is easily understood within less than a minute. I give you $5.00. You use it for the development term. Then return it to me by way of a product discount. It adds to the probability of a purchase and costs nothing out-of pocket for the vendor. It only reduces the revenue stream by $5.00, or whatever, when the purchase is made. A small price to pay for an interest free loan.

If N3V was producing tangible hard goods then it does not work as well. In that case there are hard production costs to cover per unit. With software there is no incremental hard cost per unit.

The idea, in this case, is an easily understood system of a loan to be repaid with a discounted product not some complex multi-tiered pledge scheme.

phimat
June 16th, 2014, 06:59 AM
My conscience is quite clear. We have invested in creating a product where we think there is an audience who will appreciate it. Clearly you aren't one of those, but you seem quite persistent in trying to find every negative response possible to throw at us.

Google Play algorithms take a while to populate - it still says "Not yet rated" in one part of the Train Town page while it shows 6 reviews in another (all 5 star btw).

I am not sure which account you think I have used to comment. Certainly not Ethan Nazareth who quoted "Epic In my opinion , i like this more than i like trainz" - unless of course you think I spend my time reviewing 100 other apps so that I can review our own app highly ... here is Ethans profile: https://play.google.com/store/people/details?id=100867563040691052310.

Are we expecting this product to be bigger than Trainz Sim? No. Do we believe there is an audience? Yes.

Since you have invested considerable time in the debate, can I ask if you have an Android device and if you have tried the app? If so I would be very interested in what you find good/bad or indifferent about the product (even though, I assume, you aren't in our target demographic).


http://i1056.photobucket.com/albums/t371/zydonk/20140616_110544_RichtoneHDR_zpsb28648a9.jpg (http://s1056.photobucket.com/user/zydonk/media/20140616_110544_RichtoneHDR_zpsb28648a9.jpg.html)

amigacooke
June 16th, 2014, 07:21 AM
Image as above. That would seem to be a fairly conclusive argument :)

mikey186
June 16th, 2014, 06:52 PM
Well I may NOT have my Android device (only close to this is an Amazon Kindle Fire 1st gen w/Android 2.3 modded), but as the 'end users' (obviously us), we all need just patience for the developers who worked SO HARD on the app. I don't get to seem why almost EVERY user had to start arguing of just one (or more) In-App purchases. These are one of the ways how would a developer successfully becomes popular on the app. It needs those for investments on the continuation of the development, it also needs of paying the entry fee for iOS developer program ($99 a year | if the app becomes available for iOS devices in the near future), and to help pay wages of every developer and Q&A beta tester. And also sometimes, when it needs more demand of new features (like for the original Trainz app for the iPad and Trainz Driver for the iPhone), sometimes, it needs time to just research of what it can or cannot do with APIs that are limited on isolated devices (different devices + different android versions = different features). You're reaction may be like this:

http://fc07.deviantart.net/fs71/f/2014/166/7/8/photo_jun_15__12_19_26_am_by_mikey186-d7mfq2y.gif

For some who just signed up and just don't like this version, then just don't play with it and just wait until the new version comes out (at least until the next beta release or when the FINAL release date to Google Play or Amazon App Store*). One thing I would just suggest is to take a LOOK inside the screenshots (or videos if the app has one) and the features first BEFORE you spend the money on the in-app purchase. Sometimes just bad/negative reviews just hurt us all you know. It just hurts an app's feelings when you have to 'crash and burn' the app before you even make a review. Different devices become different results (depending on model year, brand, and manufacturer-specific features). For me, I would just stick to iOS. Most apps are always optimized with the iPhone, iPad and iPod touch with great impact of results that can change everyone's lives. I watched every WWDC video to show how much great amount developers can really do with their apps.

*if the app is compatible with Amazon Kindle Fire & Fire HDX

Now to change the subject, lets see the screenshots of the gameplay so that other users can really see what's to come on the app.

~Mikey (with my Rei-babe)