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TheRichMan
June 10th, 2013, 03:48 PM
How do I increase the size of the texture so I can have higher quality skins?

JCitron
June 10th, 2013, 03:56 PM
You need to use high resolution images in the first place to have higher-quality skins.

Increasing the size of an existing low-res image will only produce a large (blown-up) version of the low res image.

Hope this makes sense.

John

TheRichMan
June 10th, 2013, 03:57 PM
Yeah I think I understand. Thanks

TheRichMan
June 10th, 2013, 04:12 PM
Well, I am a bit confused. Is the texture the same thing you open in photoshop to reskin a loocomotive?

H222
June 10th, 2013, 04:17 PM
Yes. But before you ruin something and blame trainz for it, the texture must be 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512, 1024, 2048 by 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, 512, 1024, 2048

Jamie

slabay
June 10th, 2013, 05:21 PM
Just to clarify, if you simply blow up an existing skin (say 1024x1024) to a larger size, yes, it will just give you a blurry skin. However, if you take a 1024x1024 skin, blow it up to 2048x2048 to use as a guide, and THEN do all of your reskinning/detail work in the higher resolution, it works just fine. You will have to redo all of the details (like door panels, etc.) though.

TheRichMan
June 10th, 2013, 05:39 PM
Ok thanks. I will try that

mjolnir
June 10th, 2013, 08:34 PM
If you have a good command of the features of your image processing software, it is possible to change from a texture size of 1024 x 1024 to 2048 x 2048 without loosing significant amounts of quality, by making use of some of the extrprapolation techniques in the resizing., That said, if you want the benefits of increased texture, it may not be necessary to increase the overall size of the texture, so that one can have bits of the 1024x1024 texture with a the same resolution of bits of the 2048 x 2048 texture, with other parts of the texture getting more use from smaller bits of the mesh,

And H222 was correct when he said the dimensions of a texture file must be constrained to the powers of two he mentioned. What he failed to mention, though, was that the maximum aspect ratio of the dimensions was 1 : 8, so that a texture sized 8 x 64 is compliant; a texture sized 16 x 256 is not.

ns