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Thread: So you think you know about Trains?

  1. #16
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    Correct.

    The function of the ‘regulator’ is to regulate the amount of steam being supplied to the ‘steam chest’. This then goes to the cyinders via the valves, which control the timing and amount of steam permitted into the cylinders.

  2. #17
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    Loco anti skid
    Used to control & maintain brake pressure by exhausting when req'd on long down grades when in dynamic braking to stop wheel slip
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  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by shadowarrior View Post
    Welcome to the Trains Trivia of the Week thread.

    Every Wednesday we will ask you a question here related to trains, and you will have a week to answer the question. Next Wednesday, we will update the previous week's answer and put in a new question again. You can use this thread to discuss your answers.

    If you have a trivia question which you want to be featured in this section, email it through to trainznews@n3vgames.com along with the answer.

    So you are a ferroequinologist......right?

    Last week's answer:

    The function of the 'regulator' is to regulate the amount of steam being supplied to the 'steam chest'. This then goes to the cylinders via the valves, which control the timing and amount of steam permitted into the cylinders.

    This week's question:

    What is the function of the 'bail' control/valve on a locomotive?
    The Bail Off control releases the brakes on the locomotive. When you use the train brake with a long train it takes a while for the brakes on the cars to come on, the brakes on the locomotive apply much faster. This can cause the weight of the train to push a car near the front of the train into derailment. By releasing (or 'Bailing off') the brakes on the locomotive you release the pressure at the front and let the cars drag the train to a stop from the rear. It's also useful if you need to stop the train while climbing a grade, you want to keep the the train stretched out and avoid 'bunching up' the consist as you go uphill so you would make an application with the train brake and bail off the locomotive. You would also keep some throttle on and as the train is dragged to a stop apply the locomotive brake to full apply some more train brake and cut the power. Same when you start again. Apply power, release the loco brake, bail off, and then release the train brake.

    (I took this explanation from http://www.trainsim.com/vbts/archive.../t-188861.html with limited editing; I couldn't quite put my own words to the knowledge!)

  4. #19
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    I agree with LordSven

    Bill69.
    If you are going to try cross-country skiing,
    Start with a small country.



  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmehl77 View Post
    is it not to control the speed in which the locomotive keeps a constant speed
    You're thinking of the term regulator as it is applied in the US. Stationary steam engines had regulators to maintain a constant speed. Steam locomotives didn't use devices like this. Throttle is the more common name in the US for the device Trainz calls a regulator.

    Bob Pearson

    TRAINZ-UTC-TRS04-TRS06-TC1&2-TC3-TS09-TS10-TS12
    Member since 6-14-2002

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by RPearson View Post
    You're thinking of the term regulator as it is applied in the US. Stationary steam engines had regulators to maintain a constant speed.
    Hmm isn't that what's called a governer, or is that just British slang.

    Greetings from nighttime Amsterdam,

    Jan

  7. #22
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    As I said in my answer the regulator is like the throttle valve in a car. In a car the throttle valve adjusts the amount of mixture or air to the manifold, the valves then feed it to the cylinders.

    Bill69
    If you are going to try cross-country skiing,
    Start with a small country.



  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jananton View Post
    Hmm isn't that what's called a governer, or is that just British slang.

    Greetings from nighttime Amsterdam,

    Jan
    Yes, governor. But I'm not sure about a governer.:-)

    Bob Pearson

    TRAINZ-UTC-TRS04-TRS06-TC1&2-TC3-TS09-TS10-TS12
    Member since 6-14-2002

  9. #24
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    Yup, that's what you get typing a reply late at night with no default preview option.

    Governor intended of course.

    Greetings from cloudy Amsterdam,

    Jan

  10. #25
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    LordSven got some details there and big_b got the anti skid part right as well.

    The ‘Bail’ or ‘Bail-off’ is used to release the independant (locomotive) brakes when the train brake has been applied. This allows the locomotive to ‘stretch’ the train when braking, reducing the stress on the couplers. During heavy braking, or an emergency brake application, it also prevents the locomotive’s wheels from locking up (and hence sliding).

  11. #26
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    The Flying Scotsman

    Dave
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  12. #27
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    4472, Flying Scotsman.
    The Matchbox Locomotive Works~Youtube~DeviantArt~Ask.fm
    Click on the links above to visit my website, YouTube page, DeviantArt page, and Ask.fm page.

  13. #28

    Default The first Steam Locomotive to circumnavigate the World?

    roblodge

    The Flying Scotsman!

    Quote Originally Posted by shadowarrior View Post
    Welcome to the Trains Trivia of the Week thread.

    Every Wednesday we will ask you a question here related to trains, and you will have a week to answer the question. Next Wednesday, we will update the previous week's answer and put in a new question again. You can use this thread to discuss your answers.

    If you have a trivia question which you want to be featured in this section, email it through to trainznews@n3vgames.com along with the answer.

    So you are a ferroequinologist......right?

    Last week's answer:

    The ‘Bail’ or ‘Bail-off’ is used to release the independant (locomotive) brakes when the train brake has been applied. This allows the locomotive to ‘stretch’ the train when braking, reducing the stress on the couplers. During heavy braking, or an emergency brake application, it also prevents the locomotive’s wheels from locking up (and hence sliding).

    The ‘Bail’/’Bail Off’ function is available in Trainz (Diesel locomotives only), and can be activated by pressing ‘D’, or ‘0’ on the number pad.



    This week's question:

    What was the first steam locomotive to circumnavigate the world?

  14. #29
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    The Scotsman visited North America and Australia but which route did it travel on it's sea voyages? Unless it crossed the Pacific on one of its trips the answer to the question "Which was the first steam locomotive to circumnavigate the world?" is none.

  15. #30
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    The Flying Scotsman

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