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Thread: Antivirus

  1. #61
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    Hi John and Everybody.
    John, I am sure I would speak on behalf of many who have been reading this thread in thanking you for your great contribution to the benefit of those of us who are not so computer savvy. Therefore, perhaps you could give us the benefit of your experience (along with anyone else who would like to post) in explaining what would be the percentage risk of a personal or small business PC becoming badly affected by the sort of infections you describe.

    To someone with a home PC it would seem to me that all they can do is install a good antivirus and Internet security program. For small businesses with perhaps more than six computers all they can do is to again install good software and as we do contract a good and established computer maintenance person/company to regularly inspect and maintain the system. Large companies usually have their own computer personnel and systems, but even they seem to be vulnerable to attack with press reports of several large American and European companies having their systems brought down by infection which is sometimes suspected as being sponsored by hostile governments.

    With the above in mind, is there any Internet site that anyone is aware of which can give assessments of virus infection which have been produced by persons trained in numeric risk assessment. I state the above because as someone working in industrial safety it is through numeric risk assessment that companies we deal with gauge the amount of time and resources they should put into accident prevention based on the operations they are carrying out. However, I have never seen or been made aware of anything similar in the computer industry even though people advise all too often on the high risks and dangers of virus infection.

    Also John, further to your earlier posting I am due to retire on the 28th of this month with recruitment problem being solved and the sale of the business coming into the final stages right now. So there’s going to be one hell of a swansong party on the 28th followed by a long holiday which just might see us in your part of the world.

    Bill
    Last edited by wholbr; September 2nd, 2013 at 02:37 PM.

  2. #62
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    I can't find these on my PC ... but I am deleting them via Malwarebytes log page: Remove All

    PUP.Optional.1ClickDownload.A - Registry key - HKCU\Software\1ClickDownload
    PUP.Optional.SweetIM.A - Registry Value - HKLM\Software\Software\SweetIM|simapp_id
    PUP.Optional.SweetIM.A - Registry Key - HKLM\SOFTWARE\SWEETIM

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by cascaderailroad View Post
    I can't find these on my PC ... but I am deleting them via Malwarebytes log page: Remove All

    PUP.Optional.1ClickDownload.A - Registry key - HKCU\Software\1ClickDownload
    PUP.Optional.SweetIM.A - Registry Value - HKLM\Software\Software\SweetIM|simapp_id
    PUP.Optional.SweetIM.A - Registry Key - HKLM\SOFTWARE\SWEETIM
    Thats the whole idea; they are designed so that they are hidden and they will try to to reinstall themselves if possible.
    MSI Big Bang Xpower II-Intel i7 4960X-OCZ Revodrive 3 240GB SSD-Nvidia GTX 690(2 x SLI)- GPU-32GB G.Skill Ripjaws 2133Mhz RAM

  4. #64
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    Now that they are held in Malwarebytes Quarentine I presume they are safely disabled ... should you remove an item, and then permanently delete it ... you might find that it was only a false positive, and should only have quarentined, and later have been re-enstated ... so I plan on testing my PC for a while ... and if everything works ok, then I will Delete All.

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by cascaderailroad View Post
    Now that they are held in Malwarebytes Quarentine I presume they are safely disabled ... should you remove an item, and then permanently delete it ... you might find that it was only a false positive, and should only have quarentined, and later have been re-enstated ... so I plan on testing my PC for a while ... and if everything works ok, then I will Delete All.
    Delete them. They are not doing anything have been moved out of the way. Besides, why would you want that garbage in your system anyway.

    John
    Trainz User ID: 124863

  6. #66
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    Currently using Kaspersky, it works but HOGS BANDWIDTH LIKE A MOTHA! Dell XPS17 Win7Pro, i7-2720qm, NVidia GT555M + 8GB. Want to switch back to McAfee as delivered. Thoughts, local pro John?
    Union of Morons, Local 6 and 7/8ths
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    & Christopher Awdry's Complete Collection

  7. #67

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    Have used ESET NOD32 Antivirus 5 in the last 3 years, now using version 6 under a yearly paid subscription and haven't looked back at any other AV since. Performance wise for real-time resource usage I found ESET uses about 0.10% CPU/Memory. On a full system scan or manual use it averages around 20% - 35% of CPU usage on my beefed up high end system.

    What ever is in your favor, whether or not it's worth considering when searching for a reliable AV software.

  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by wholbr View Post
    Hi John and Everybody.
    John, I am sure I would speak on behalf of many who have been reading this thread in thanking you for your great contribution to the benefit of those of us who are not so computer savvy. Therefore, perhaps you could give us the benefit of your experience (along with anyone else who would like to post) in explaining what would be the percentage risk of a personal or small business PC becoming badly affected by the sort of infections you describe.

    To someone with a home PC it would seem to me that all they can do is install a good antivirus and Internet security program. For small businesses with perhaps more than six computers all they can do is to again install good software and as we do contract a good and established computer maintenance person/company to regularly inspect and maintain the system. Large companies usually have their own computer personnel and systems, but even they seem to be vulnerable to attack with press reports of several large American and European companies having their systems brought down by infection which is sometimes suspected as being sponsored by hostile governments.

    With the above in mind, is there any Internet site that anyone is aware of which can give assessments of virus infection which have been produced by persons trained in numeric risk assessment. I state the above because as someone working in industrial safety it is through numeric risk assessment that companies we deal with gauge the amount of time and resources they should put into accident prevention based on the operations they are carrying out. However, I have never seen or been made aware of anything similar in the computer industry even though people advise all too often on the high risks and dangers of virus infection.

    Also John, further to your earlier posting I am due to retire on the 28th of this month with recruitment problem being solved and the sale of the business coming into the final stages right now. So there’s going to be one hell of a swansong party on the 28th followed by a long holiday which just might see us in your part of the world.

    Bill

    Hi Bill,

    I'm no "expert" at these things, however, I have worked in the IT industry for quite some time. From what I have experienced, and read about from various sources, the biggest prevention of malware attacks is education. Having the guards, i.e., the antivirus and firewalls in place is only a part of the picture, and a small part of the picture. When I was an working as a technician, I used to educate my users regarding various aspects of computer security. I showed them how to mitigate their exposure to malware, and how to recognize when something was not Kosher. While at the former Polaroid spin-off, I supported close to 200 people at one time, and we hardly had any malware infections. The good antivirus product in place, which we kept up-to-date not only on the servers, but also on the desktops, along with employee education, helped keep the infections down. This is the biggest problem in large companies. They don't take the time to educate the employees on malware prevention, and instead rely on the guards at the door to protect the fort. It's a two, or in reality a three-part system that works best.

    Here is an interesting link to a company called Knowbe4. This company was founded by Stu Sauerman former CEO of Sunbelt Software. He left when Sunbelt was acquired by GFI systems a few years ago. I have spoken with Stu personally and actually knew him before he worked with Sunbelt. He and Alex Eckleberry founded Sunbelt and brought that company up into the top-notch malware fighting companies.

    http://www.knowbe4.com/

    Today, Stu's new company does lectures to employees and management to assist them in fighting malware. He assists with network and system security compliance. which as you know is extremely important today.

    Regarding statistics this is a difficult one. Each antivirus company has their own methods for tracking the so-called current threat levels, and to add insult to injury, they also have different names for the same malware. It would be nice if a group such as the IEEE or ANSI developed a consistent naming convention for malware as that would help everyone not only track the malware but also with the reporting.

    What is interesting too is how the industry, both on the malware creators' and fighters' side has changed. According to the industry experts, the current wave of malware is created from a social engineering point of view. In the old days viruses destroyed their hosts where as today the goal is to maximize the investment by the malware creators. They aim to get the biggest crowd and gain the most monetarily. They use the common and familiar infection avenues, called vectors, such as social websites like Facebook, for example, or links within emails, to infect users. Again, educating the users to be suspicious of particular links, and how to use the common sense when navigating the web really does help. I have done this with not just my own immediate family, but many other people I have helped over the years. Because of my end-user education, we see very little malware intrusions in my house, or even amongst the people I have trained.

    Most home users aren't so lucky, and probably have the most difficult task as they do not know how to fight the infections, and don't have the resources available to them such as the IT staff at large companies. Then again most IT staff are overworked. Heck, when I was at Oracle, I was supporting 680 fulltime employees at my location alone with one other person, and this didn't happen until I hurt myself at work. Then they brought in a contractor to help. The work level there is constant and really hectic, and we weren't just fighting viruses. That was a small sub-section of our daily support. We also were rolling out upgrades, performing disk encryption, and many other break-fix tasks that in reality really needed a staff or 4 or 6 people for that many employees. Biggest part of the equation is cost. Training people costs a lot of money, and this is one of the reasons, I think, that companies rely on the guards instead of the education, and probably why there are so many infections at the big companies.

    This as you can see, Bill is a big fish to fry with so many aspects of it that we've barely scratched the surface of. It takes more than just a good antivirus product and an occasional visit from the IT staff to keep machines in tiptop clean working order.

    Congratulations on your upcoming retirement. I am truly happy for you!

    John
    Trainz User ID: 124863

  9. #69
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    John has provided some pretty good advice on a serious topic. Here In Australia, one of the good things the federal government does is to provide an alert service on current scams and issues. Its a subscriber service and I'm sure other countries will do the same. It might be worth investigating.

    I use Trend Micro Titanium and that works for me. It comes with a firewall and that can need a little managing but is not difficult.

    The earlier comment about smart TVs (internet enabled) got me thinking. While a virus for those devices is probably of less concern than a PC infection, there are other aspects that could be an issue. Imagine if someone managed to "update" your smart TV with a rogue software update that included code to monitor what you watch. I saw an article recently where a company used Facebook data to identify what people watched on TV and when. That data was allegedly used during the last U.S. presidential election to target TV ads.

    One of the devices I like to use is a Kindle to read electronic books. When I later installed the Kindle software on my iPad, the software asked me if I wanted it to update the ebook reading positions on my iPad from my Kindle. Big brother may, or may not, be watching, but Amazon is.

    A bit scary at times.

    Paul


  10. #70
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    Hi John,pcas1986 and everybody.
    Once again John thank you for making this thread one of the most informative I personally have ever seen on this forum throughout the years I have been a member and I am sure others feel the same.

    First in responding can I quickly comment on pcas1986 posting regarding Smart TVs. The scenario he envisages regarding data on viewing habits being collected by the TV manufacturers and content providers is already happening. Lovefilm, Netflicks, LG and the latest “now TV” (which is really sky online and launched this week) all collect data on what you watch which enables them to “suggest” programmes which may be of interest to you next time you switch on. So, Big Brother really is watching (LOL)

    Regarding what John was advising on malware and viruses I would totally agree this is a huge subject in which so few have any grasp of the real problems and I would include myself in that. As was stated the person with a laptop or PC at home probably has the most difficult problem regarding protection. To lose your trainz content or even the whole programme would certainly be very annoying but would not in all seriousness be the end of the world. However, there are many people these days work from home either in their own businesses or for an employer. To them the loss of files could be catastrophic to say the least and could easily cost them their job or business.

    On top of the above you now have many thousands of small to medium-size businesses which have launched in the last few years throughout Britain and I believe America and are now leading the recovery from recession with new jobs and opportunities for many. From my own experience with my own company, every effort has to go into finding work, ensuring that the work produces a profit which substantiates your own living and allows you to pay the wages of those you employ.

    With all the above in mind, many small business owners do not have the time to think about computer security regarding viruses, malware etc. As in the case of myself and I am sure many others, to leave home at six in the morning and not return until nine or ten at night has not been an unusual event over the last eight years. The foregoing as John so rightly states, leaves the office computers at risk but that is certainly not the end of it.

    Britain’s railways have become travelling offices for its ever-increasing numbers of passengers. In that we use the on-board Wi-Fi of the operating companies as well as the 3G and now 4G of the mobile networks through our laptops and tablets. I doubt if any of those travellers including myself know if those systems are secure but regardless of that you have to use them as they have become an essential integrated part of business life in Britain and throughout Europe.

    The burgeoning new private business community can only provide the resources that they can within their budgets with regard to computer security. Many companies including my own do not allow staff to use the office computers on the social networks such as Facebook and Twitter. The foregoing is usually covered under threat of severe disciplinary action should this rule be disregarded. Outside of that there would seem to be little that small and middle sized businesses can do other than having good anti-virus and Internet security programs on their computers and servers within their offices and trusting to luck and the powers that be outside of them. I would totally agree that staff training would be the best way forward but it is often that the resources to finance this are not available in smaller companies.

    The above was the reason I suggested that numeric risk assessment could be carried out on viruses and malware whenever these are discovered and would provide company managements with a far better idea of risk of infection as well as the damage that could occur if they are computers are infected. I will not go into how numeric risk assessment is carried out as I do not wish this posting to go on any longer. However I would be happy to post separately on it or to any member by personal email if requested.

    As John stated, this is a huge and serious subject to which the eyes of many of us are only just being opened

    Bill
    Last edited by wholbr; September 3rd, 2013 at 03:07 PM.

  11. #71

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    Quote Originally Posted by davesnow View Post
    Norton indeed is a piece of crap.
    Ditto, happened a while ago, but, at the time a current and and regularly updated allowed a virus to get through.

    Their are better anti-virus software programs available.
    The PC Brigade has gone completely Mad
    Now Thomas has been affected by the PCB

  12. #72
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    This is interesting news about Symantec...

    http://www.zdnet.com/symantec-denies...es-7000010630/

    John
    Trainz User ID: 124863

  13. #73
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    Anybody have avast! I think it's a pretty good program.
    Speaking of viruses, paulztrainz seems to be infected.

  14. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by crazypoo View Post
    Anybody have avast! I think it's a pretty good program.
    Speaking of viruses, paulztrainz seems to be infected.
    AVAST is not a bad program. I've used it off and on in the past on various systems that came with it. When the trial ran out, I went with what I had purchased previously since I already had a license or a multiple license I could use on several systems at once.

    I've seen reports about Paulz Trainz. That's too bad.

    John
    Trainz User ID: 124863

  15. #75

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    How good or bad is Trend Micro?
    The PC Brigade has gone completely Mad
    Now Thomas has been affected by the PCB

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